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Congress’ anger at FBI shapes surveillance program’s future – posted at 08:34:04 UTC via thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com

 April 29, 2023 5:14 am | Selected Articles Review – The News And Times | Expanded View | RSS Page | Blog 


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WASHINGTON — 

U.S. intelligence agencies pushing lawmakers to reauthorize a controversial set of surveillance tools are hoping to get a boost from a new report showing fewer U.S. citizens and residents are getting swept up in the agencies’ collection efforts.

The just-released report by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence found that even as U.S. intelligence agencies are making greater use of collection authorities under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the number of U.S. persons — citizens or legal residents — being targeted has declined steadily.

Friday’s transparency report said there were only 49 court-approved surveillance or search orders for U.S. persons in 2022, down from 67 in 2021 and from 102 in 2020.

Additionally, the number of U.S. persons subject to law enforcement queries after they were swept up in foreign electronic surveillance, under what is known as FISA Section 702, also saw a “significant decline,” according to the report, despite an overall increase in the use of the authorities.

FBI abused access, say some

FISA Section 702 allows for the National Security Agency and the FBI to conduct electronic surveillance and data collection of non-Americans. But such efforts sometimes pick up information on U.S. persons, and that has been a point of contention for some lawmakers and civil liberties groups who argue the FBI has abused its access to the data.

According to the report, the number of non-Americans targeted under FISA Section 702 jumped to 246,000 in 2022, an increase of more than 13,600 from the previous year.

However, the ODNI’s records indicated the FBI searches of the data for information on U.S. persons dropped by almost 96%.

“This reduction occurred following a number of changes FBI made to its systems, processes and training relating to U.S. person queries,” the report said.

FBI Director Christopher Wray has similarly touted internal reforms, telling lawmakers last month that the bureau’s own data showed searches for U.S. citizens or their information under Section 702 had dropped 93% from 2021 to 2022.

“We are absolutely committed to making sure that we show you, the rest of the members of Congress and the American people that we’re worthy of these incredibly valuable authorities,” he said at the time.

Yet the FBI’s assurances, and the new report from ODNI, have done little to assuage lawmakers charged with reauthorizing the FISA Section 702 authorities before they expire at the end of the year.

“We need to pass substantive and meaningful reforms to help deter abusive behavior by the FBI in the FISA process,” Representative Mike Turner, House Intelligence Committee chairman, and Representative Darin LaHood, both Republicans, said in a statement Friday.

“We must protect the American people’s privacy and civil liberties,” they said. “Without additional safeguards, a clean reauthorization of 702 is a nonstarter.”

LaHood, who said last month that the FBI searched for his name in foreign data multiple times under FISA Section 702, has been leading a bipartisan working group charged with proposing meaningful reforms.

Lawmakers have also been joined by human rights groups, who argue the latest data show problems remain.

“While the new statistics show a decline, the total number of searches is huge even now, and the intrusion on Americans’ privacy is undeniable,” Patrick Toomey, deputy director with the American Civil Liberties Union’s National Security Project, said in a statement.

“FBI agents are sitting at their computers and subjecting Americans to warrantless ‘backdoor searches’ hundreds of times per day,” Toomey said. “After years of FBI surveillance abuses, it’s time for Congress to step in and require the constitutional gold standard: a warrant.”

‘A vital source of intelligence’

Despite such concerns, U.S. intelligence officials have repeatedly urged lawmakers to renew the collection authorities, arguing they are critical to protecting Americans at home and U.S. interests abroad.

NSA Cybersecurity Director Rob Joyce earlier this month called FISA Section 702 “a vital source of intelligence.”

“I can’t do cybersecurity at the scope and scale we do it today without that authority,” he told an audience in Washington.

A day later, CIA Director William Burns told an audience at Rice University in Texas that FISA Section 702 has become an indispensable tool in combating drug cartels sending fentanyl into the U.S.

U.S. intelligence officials have previously credited FISA Section 702 warrantless surveillance authorities with providing information crucial in launching the strike that killed al-Qaida terror leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.

 

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WASHINGTON — Growing anger at the FBI from both parties in Congress has become a major hurdle for U.S. intelligence agencies fighting to keep their vast powers to collect foreign communications that often sweep up the phone calls and emails of Americans.

Key lawmakers say they won’t vote to renew the programs under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that expire at the end of this year without major changes targeting the FBI. Many blame problems with how the FBI’s special agents search for U.S. citizens using Section 702 — along with publicly revealed mistakes in other intelligence investigations by the bureau.

Among the revelations since the law was last renewed in 2018: The bureau misled surveillance court judges in seeking to wiretap a 2016 campaign aide for former President Donald Trump, and agents didn’t follow guidelines in searching Section 702 databases for the names of a congressman on the House Intelligence Committee, a local political party, and people of Middle Eastern descent.

Two successive chief judges of the primary U.S. surveillance court criticized the bureau in written opinions, with one saying the frequency of mistakes in the bureau’s investigation of Russian election interference “calls into question whether information contained in other FBI applications is reliable.”

The debate is of great consequence to U.S. intelligence officials, who argue that the law is perhaps their most critical tool to stopping terrorism, enemy spies, and cyberattacks. According to the intelligence community, 59% of the items in the briefing given daily to President Joe Biden last year featured information the National Security Agency captured under Section 702.

And the classified Pentagon documents leaked online in recent weeks make clear how much the U.S. relies on electronic snooping, with dozens of items on allies and foes alike sourced to what’s known as “signals intelligence.”

“Section 702 has kept American citizens safe and our U.S. service members abroad out of danger,” said Rep. Mike Turner, the Ohio Republican who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, in a statement. “However, changes must be made in order to prevent further FBI misuse and abuse of this vital national security tool.”

Reps. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., and Warren Davidson, R-Ohio, issued a joint statement in March saying the FBI was searching for Americans “at an alarming scale” and calling for an overhaul of the program.

The FBI says it uses foreign communications for its national security investigations and tightly controls how agents access Americans’ data. Bureau officials this week released a checklist their agents are supposed to use in conducting searches. They also have overhauled their computer systems and added new mandatory training for agents in December 2021.

Searches likely to bring back 100 or more results must now be cleared first with an FBI attorney, and the deputy director must personally approve what the FBI calls “certain types of sensitive queries,” including searches of U.S. public officials.

“Like any major institution, we have made mistakes,” FBI Director Chris Wray testified before Congress in March. “To me, the mark of a leading organization is not whether it makes mistakes or not … but whether or not we learn from those mistakes. And I think we have.”

Rep. Jim Himes, of Connecticut, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said he supported the FBI’s changes and wanted them to be included in a renewed surveillance law.

Mr. Himes argued some Republican critics were motivated by the investigations against Mr. Trump, including the search that the FBI conducted last year of his Florida residence.

“I think anger at the FBI has become an article of faith in the Republican conference,” he said in an interview.

Under Section 702, the U.S. collects foreign communications without a warrant — and with the required participation of American telecom companies — to create databases that analysts can search for intelligence purposes. They can target foreigners outside the U.S. for collection.

Agencies cannot target American citizens or foreigners on U.S. soil, or go after a foreigner with the purpose of collecting a U.S. citizen’s emails or phone calls.

The FBI disclosed that it conducted as many as 3.4 million searches of Section 702 data for Americans in 2021 — a figure that dropped sharply to 204,000 last year, according to an annual report released Friday by the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

The FBI said it introduced new counting methods for Friday’s report that lowered the 2021 and 2022 figures to about 3 million and 110,000, respectively, by removing duplicative searches.

The bureau said it had run only 16 searches between December 2021 and November 2022 to seek evidence of a crime without a foreign intelligence purpose.

But civil liberties advocates have long argued that the program may violate the Fourth Amendment by giving the FBI warrantless access to vast amounts of Americans’ communications.

Patrick Toomey, deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s National Security Project, said Section 702 has become “a domestic spying tool for the FBI.”

“The rules are extraordinarily permissive in practice, and yet FBI agents still regularly violate them,” Mr. Toomey said in an email. “Congress should require a warrant for these searches to protect Americans, because the FBI cannot be left to police itself.”

Some lawmakers also support requiring the FBI to get warrants for every search of Section 702 data. National security officials oppose a warrant requirement, saying it would flood courts with thousands of new cases and make many uses of the program impractical.

Majority Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee are instead pushing for new criminal penalties against agents who willfully provide false information to a surveillance court, according to multiple people familiar with their plans who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

That proposal is driven by a perception that the FBI won’t punish agents who abuse their authorities and a concern from Republicans that the bureau and Wray won’t answer their questions about disciplinary actions taken, said Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah.

“One thing that societies cannot sustain is when they feel they cannot trust their own law enforcement, their own intelligence agencies,” he said. “We have to implement reforms to regain some of that trust.”

A senior FBI official declined to say how many agents have been dismissed or disciplined for violations, but said the bureau had found that deliberate misconduct by agents was rare. The official spoke on condition of anonymity under ground rules set by the bureau.

Members of both parties have also discussed moving to extend the terms of judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which holds classified proceedings and approves wiretaps as well as the intelligence community’s Section 702 rules each year.

They also want the court to transcribe all hearings for appeals and to expand the use of outside advocates — known as amicus curiae — who can oppose FBI requests before the court, the people said.

Lawmakers may push for a short extension into next year so they can complete a package of long-term changes. But the future of the program at present is uncertain.

Rep. Jason Crow, a Colorado Democrat who also sits on the committee, said that while he supports changes to the law, it was critical for Congress to keep it in place.

“If we lose this program, we just go blind overnight in a lot of critical areas,” he said.

First Published April 28, 2023, 3:06pm

 

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Deeper Look Into Past of Jack Teixeira

posted at 08:05:25 UTC via necn.com

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 Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader – 6:49 AM 4/29/2023

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 10:44:49 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

My Opinion – #Opinion #Zakharova Ms. Zakharova: If you are such a good boxer, how come you still have this nice, big, prominent (literally), unmistakably JEWISH NOSE, which is still intact and unaffected by your passion for boxing?

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Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 10:44:49 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

FBI #FBI: Und ziz iz America! Gimme POISON! Or dismantle the MONSTER FBI!

“It’s obviously very concerning that there’s that volume of searches,” Horowitz said. Over 1 million secret searches of Americans conducted by the #FBI—about 30% of the total—were done in error, @JusticeOIG Michael Horowitz testified. theepochtimes.com/over-one-m…

The Epoch Times @EpochTimes

posted at 10:44:49 UTC by The Epoch Times via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

“It’s obviously very concerning that there’s that volume of searches,” Horowitz said. Over 1 million secret searches of Americans conducted by the #FBI—about 30% of the total—were done in error, @JusticeOIG Michael Horowitz testified. theepochtimes.com/over-one-m…

FBI @FBI

posted at 10:44:49 UTC by FBI via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

In discussing cartels during today’s House Appropriations Committee hearing, Director Wray said that the #FBI is consistently innovating new strategies to maximize impact on the sophisticated threat they pose to American communities.

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FBI @FBI

posted at 10:44:49 UTC by FBI via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

At today’s House Appropriations Committee hearing, #FBI Director Christopher Wray reiterated that “the scale of the Chinese cyber threat is unparalleled” and that “they’ve got a bigger hacking program than every other major nation combined.”

media/FuwNSFFXsAICJYl.jpg media/FuwNSGvWIAUUQEu.jpg

Robert Morton @Robert4787

posted at 10:44:49 UTC by Robert Morton via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

US intelligence has #FBI warrants for over 60 Russians in connection with dastardly global plots and outright criminality- best they not travel to countries that have extradition agreements with U.S. #defense #CIA euronews.com/2023/04/27/who-…

FBI @FBI

posted at 10:14:35 UTC by FBI via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Today, #FBI Director Wray spoke on the Chinese government’s disregard for the rule of law: “It’s frankly outrageous that the Chinese government would think that it could set up shop here on our soil and conduct uncoordinated, unsanctioned, illegal law enforcement operations.”

Huckberry @Huckberry

posted at 10:14:35 UTC by Huckberry via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

As Seen in HBO’S “The Last of Us”. Our Flannel-Lined Waxed Trucker Jacket is tough enough for a zombie apocalypse.

Peter @PeterleHuber

posted at 10:14:35 UTC by Peter via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 10:14:35 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

My Opinion – #Opinion #Zakharova Ms. Zakharova: If you are such a good boxer, how come you still have this nice, big, prominent (literally), unmistakably JEWISH NOSE, which is still intact and unaffected by your passion for boxing?

#Opinion by Maria Zakharova: 🇺🇸 Global Engagement Centre could have come up with something more serious for $120 M. than just publish the Maria Zakharova CV 👉Maria is the only Spokesperson with a personal page on the websites of 2 nuke superpowers 🔗is.gd/CTDlny

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Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 09:45:29 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

sevastopol fire – Google Search shar.es/af9fbq

media/Fu3yBx3WAAAS75N.png

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 09:45:29 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Apparent drone attack starts fire at Crimea fuel depot reuters.com/world/europe/fue…

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

US Intelligence Surveillance of Americans Drops Sharply – Google Search shar.es/af9f1K

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

They are not able to use the human intelligence properly, can you imagine what will happen, if they use the artificial one?!

USI needs AI-powered open source intelligence gathering—and much more—to get a grip on what China is really up to, writes @PLMattis, coauthor of ‘Chinese Communist Espionage.’ Spies and eavesdropping on targeted communications aren’t enough. foreignaffairs.com/china/how…

Anders Åslund @anders_aslund

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by Anders Åslund via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Putin’s Friend Viktor Medvedchuk Launches ‘Another Ukraine’ Movement in Russia With Propagandists and Accused Traitors kyivpost.com/post/16359?utm_…

The Moscow Times @MoscowTimes

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by The Moscow Times via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Sevastopol, the home of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet, has been hit by a series of drone attacks since the Kremlin’s Ukraine offensive launched. themoscowtimes.com/2023/04/2…

The New York Times @nytimes

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by The New York Times via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

The Netherlands plans to make public a vast trove of about 32 million documents compiled about people accused of collaborating with the Nazis during their occupation of the country. The files have been restricted since the end of World War II. nyti.ms/40IqOqY

Robert Morton @Robert4787

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by Robert Morton via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Hmm…I thought #Putin would love this guy who likes to artillery shell civilian areas and use of landmines, partook in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 in 2014, and has been sanctioned by the European Union for atrocities. Two peas in a pod. newsweek.com/vladimir-putin-…

Радио Свобода @SvobodaRadio

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by Радио Свобода via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Владимир Кара-Мурза, политик, историк и журналист в середине апреля был приговорённый к 25 годам колонии строгого режима, дал первое интервью после приговора. smarturl.click/GzAZ

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 09:16:32 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

#FBI #America #PoliceState US Intelligence Surveillance of Americans Drops Sharply – Google Search shar.es/af9f1K My Opinion – #Opinion: Stupid, incompetent, treacherous FBI turned America into the police state – Google Search shar.es/af9f1c

media/Fu3sjMCXwAAtHk4.jpg

The News And Times Information Network – Blogs By Michael Novakhov – thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com

 

Congress’ anger at FBI shapes surveillance program’s future

posted at 08:33:03 UTC (updated on Sat Apr 29, 2023 08:42) by Michael Novakhov (Mike Nova) via The News And Times

Congress’ anger at FBI shapes surveillance program’s future

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WASHINGTON — Growing anger at the FBI from both parties in Congress has become a major hurdle for U.S. intelligence agencies fighting to keep their vast powers to collect foreign communications that often sweep up the phone calls and emails of Americans.

Key lawmakers say they won’t vote to renew the programs under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that expire at the end of this year without major changes targeting the FBI. Many blame problems with how the FBI’s special agents search for U.S. citizens using Section 702 — along with publicly revealed mistakes in other intelligence investigations by the bureau.

Among the revelations since the law was last renewed in 2018: The bureau misled surveillance court judges in seeking to wiretap a 2016 campaign aide for former President Donald Trump, and agents didn’t follow guidelines in searching Section 702 databases for the names of a congressman on the House Intelligence Committee, a local political party, and people of Middle Eastern descent.

Two successive chief judges of the primary U.S. surveillance court criticized the bureau in written opinions, with one saying the frequency of mistakes in the bureau’s investigation of Russian election interference “calls into question whether information contained in other FBI applications is reliable.”

The debate is of great consequence to U.S. intelligence officials, who argue that the law is perhaps their most critical tool to stopping terrorism, enemy spies, and cyberattacks. According to the intelligence community, 59% of the items in the briefing given daily to President Joe Biden last year featured information the National Security Agency captured under Section 702.

And the classified Pentagon documents leaked online in recent weeks make clear how much the U.S. relies on electronic snooping, with dozens of items on allies and foes alike sourced to what’s known as “signals intelligence.”

“Section 702 has kept American citizens safe and our U.S. service members abroad out of danger,” said Rep. Mike Turner, the Ohio Republican who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, in a statement. “However, changes must be made in order to prevent further FBI misuse and abuse of this vital national security tool.”

Reps. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., and Warren Davidson, R-Ohio, issued a joint statement in March saying the FBI was searching for Americans “at an alarming scale” and calling for an overhaul of the program.

The FBI says it uses foreign communications for its national security investigations and tightly controls how agents access Americans’ data. Bureau officials this week released a checklist their agents are supposed to use in conducting searches. They also have overhauled their computer systems and added new mandatory training for agents in December 2021.

Searches likely to bring back 100 or more results must now be cleared first with an FBI attorney, and the deputy director must personally approve what the FBI calls “certain types of sensitive queries,” including searches of U.S. public officials.

“Like any major institution, we have made mistakes,” FBI Director Chris Wray testified before Congress in March. “To me, the mark of a leading organization is not whether it makes mistakes or not … but whether or not we learn from those mistakes. And I think we have.”

Rep. Jim Himes, of Connecticut, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said he supported the FBI’s changes and wanted them to be included in a renewed surveillance law.

Mr. Himes argued some Republican critics were motivated by the investigations against Mr. Trump, including the search that the FBI conducted last year of his Florida residence.

“I think anger at the FBI has become an article of faith in the Republican conference,” he said in an interview.

Under Section 702, the U.S. collects foreign communications without a warrant — and with the required participation of American telecom companies — to create databases that analysts can search for intelligence purposes. They can target foreigners outside the U.S. for collection.

Agencies cannot target American citizens or foreigners on U.S. soil, or go after a foreigner with the purpose of collecting a U.S. citizen’s emails or phone calls.

The FBI disclosed that it conducted as many as 3.4 million searches of Section 702 data for Americans in 2021 — a figure that dropped sharply to 204,000 last year, according to an annual report released Friday by the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

The FBI said it introduced new counting methods for Friday’s report that lowered the 2021 and 2022 figures to about 3 million and 110,000, respectively, by removing duplicative searches.

The bureau said it had run only 16 searches between December 2021 and November 2022 to seek evidence of a crime without a foreign intelligence purpose.

But civil liberties advocates have long argued that the program may violate the Fourth Amendment by giving the FBI warrantless access to vast amounts of Americans’ communications.

Patrick Toomey, deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s National Security Project, said Section 702 has become “a domestic spying tool for the FBI.”

“The rules are extraordinarily permissive in practice, and yet FBI agents still regularly violate them,” Mr. Toomey said in an email. “Congress should require a warrant for these searches to protect Americans, because the FBI cannot be left to police itself.”

Some lawmakers also support requiring the FBI to get warrants for every search of Section 702 data. National security officials oppose a warrant requirement, saying it would flood courts with thousands of new cases and make many uses of the program impractical.

Majority Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee are instead pushing for new criminal penalties against agents who willfully provide false information to a surveillance court, according to multiple people familiar with their plans who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

That proposal is driven by a perception that the FBI won’t punish agents who abuse their authorities and a concern from Republicans that the bureau and Wray won’t answer their questions about disciplinary actions taken, said Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah.

“One thing that societies cannot sustain is when they feel they cannot trust their own law enforcement, their own intelligence agencies,” he said. “We have to implement reforms to regain some of that trust.”

A senior FBI official declined to say how many agents have been dismissed or disciplined for violations, but said the bureau had found that deliberate misconduct by agents was rare. The official spoke on condition of anonymity under ground rules set by the bureau.

Members of both parties have also discussed moving to extend the terms of judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which holds classified proceedings and approves wiretaps as well as the intelligence community’s Section 702 rules each year.

They also want the court to transcribe all hearings for appeals and to expand the use of outside advocates — known as amicus curiae — who can oppose FBI requests before the court, the people said.

Lawmakers may push for a short extension into next year so they can complete a package of long-term changes. But the future of the program at present is uncertain.

Rep. Jason Crow, a Colorado Democrat who also sits on the committee, said that while he supports changes to the law, it was critical for Congress to keep it in place.

“If we lose this program, we just go blind overnight in a lot of critical areas,” he said.

First Published April 28, 2023, 3:06pm

The News And Times Information Network – Blogs By Michael Novakhov – thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com

 

Saved Web Pages – Daily Report at 9 p.m. – Special counsel subpoenas research firm hired by Trump campaign

posted at 01:00:11 UTC (updated on Sat Apr 29, 2023 10:45) by Michael Novakhov (Mike Nova) via The News And Times

Saved Web Pages – Daily Report at 9 p.m.

created by Michael Novakhov  •  Apr 28 2023

The most notable news articles in full text version.
Current Page:
https://www.inoreader.com/stream/user/1006407045/tag/web-pages/view/html

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Alleged Pentagon Leaker Posted Chilling Messages About ‘Violence and Murder’ audio-posts.com/jack-teixeir……thenewsandtimes.com16h

The News And Times Information Network – Blogs By Michael Novakhov – thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com

 

OSINTdefender @sentdefender

posted at 12:16:05 UTC by OSINTdefender via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

A Ukrainian “Kamikaze” Drone Attack has reportedly taken place against an Oil Refinery and Depot used by the Russian Military at Kozacha Bay near the City of Sevastopol in Russian-Occupied Crimea.

 

DW на русском @dw_russian

posted at 12:16:05 UTC by DW на русском via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Польские власти забирают у посольства РФ в Варшаве здание школы. Сотрудникам и учащимся дано время до 18 часов, чтобы покинуть здание. МИД Польши ссылается на решения судов. Посол РФ назвал действия властей Варшавы незаконными и пообещал выразить протест p.dw.com/p/4Qi6P?maca=rus-tc…

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Elsevier Psychiatry @els_psychiatry

posted at 12:16:05 UTC by Elsevier Psychiatry via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Introducing the Journal of Mood & Anxiety Disorders™ – The Official journal of the Anxiety & Depression Association of America – Read the full Aims and Scope and Guide for Authors Now spkl.io/60164eFrm

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The New York Times @nytimes

posted at 12:16:05 UTC by The New York Times via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Craig Coyner helped turn Bend, Oregon, into one of the nation’s fastest-growing cities. Then, having been pulled through a vortex of the same crises that were churning through towns across the West, he became homeless in the city where he was once mayor. nyti.ms/44g69xx

 

Ben Hodges @general_ben

posted at 12:16:05 UTC by Ben Hodges via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

One of the reasons I was so wrong in my estimation of Russian Military capabilities was that I failed to appreciate the depth and impact of corruption within the Russian Ministry of Defense.

 

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 12:16:05 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

ukraine’s counteroffensive – Google Search shar.es/af9fDb youtube.com/watch?v=1QO55JZc…

 

Christopher White @cwwhiteNCR

posted at 11:45:26 UTC by Christopher White via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

New: Pope Francis had a 20 minute private meeting with Russian Orthodox Metropolitan Hilarion of Budapest and Hungary, who until recently was Russian Orthodox Patriarch’s Kirill’s ‘foreign minister.’ Vatican only says tone was “cordial” but did not note what they discussed.

 

Michael Novakhov @mikenov

posted at 11:45:26 UTC by Michael Novakhov via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Pope Francis met with Metropolitan Hilarion in Budapest – Google Search shar.es/af9fZO

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Vatican News @VaticanNews

posted at 11:45:26 UTC by Vatican News via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Pope Francis met with Metropolitan Hilarion of Budapest and Hungary, of the Russian Orthodox Church, for around 20 minutes on Saturday at the Apostolic Nunciature in Budapest. #PopeInHungary

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ТАСС @tass_agency

posted at 11:45:26 UTC by ТАСС via Tweets by ‎@mikenov

Michael Novakhov retweeted:

Заявления Джо Байдена, касающиеся уничтожения существующего строя в КНДР, представляют собой “вздор старика без будущего”, считает сестра Ким Чен Ына, заместитель заведующего отделом ЦК Трудовой партии Кореи Ким Ё Чжон: bit.ly/3naL5b1

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Catching a serial killer | The FOX True Crime Podcast

posted at 12:23:02 UTC by Fox News via Fox News

In the middle of the night in February 2010, a young woman was raped, strangled, and left to die in a snowy Virginia forest. After flagging down a couple driving by, the woman recounted the horrific story of the night before. Later that day, law enforcement would arrest Jorge Avila-Torrez for the attack. Little did they know that upon collecting his DNA, a string of previous assaults and murders connected to Avila-Torrez would be revealed. Former Federal and State Prosecutor Jonathan Fahey led the case. He shares the full story behind Jorge Avila-Torrez’s crimes, how a confession was obtained, and details from the trial in the case against him. #FoxNews #TrueCrime

Subscribe to The FOX True Crime Podcast: https://bit.ly/3SznEDw

Subscribe to Fox News! https://bit.ly/2vBUvAS
Watch more Fox News Video: http://video.foxnews.com
Watch Fox News Channel Live: http://www.foxnewsgo.com/

FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service delivering breaking news as well as political and business news. The number one network in cable, FNC has been the most-watched television news channel for 18 consecutive years. According to a 2020 Brand Keys Consumer Loyalty Engagement Index report, FOX News is the top brand in the country for morning and evening news coverage. A 2019 Suffolk University poll named FOX News as the most trusted source for television news or commentary, while a 2019 Brand Keys Emotion Engagement Analysis survey found that FOX News was the most trusted cable news brand. A 2017 Gallup/Knight Foundation survey also found that among Americans who could name an objective news source, FOX News was the top-cited outlet. Owned by FOX Corporation, FNC is available in nearly 90 million homes and dominates the cable news landscape, routinely notching the top ten programs in the genre.

Watch full episodes of your favorite shows
The Five: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/the-five
Special Report with Bret Baier: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/special-report
Jesse Watters Primetime: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/jesse-watters-primetime
Hannity: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/hannity
The Ingraham Angle: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/ingraham-angle
Gutfeld!: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/gutfeld
Fox News @ Night: https://www.foxnews.com/video/shows/fox-news-night

Follow Fox News on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoxNews/
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Police: 5 people killed in shooting at Texas home

posted at 11:39:01 UTC by The Associated Press via NewsNation Now

CLEVELAND, Texas (AP) — Five people were killed in a shooting at a home in southeast Texas late Friday night, authorities said.

Four people were pronounced dead at the scene of the shooting in Cleveland and the fifth died at a hospital, the San Jacinto County Sheriff’s Office said early Saturday.

The shooting in the community about 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Houston was reported around 10:30 p.m.

No further details about the shooting or the victims were immediately available.

No arrests have been made.

© Copyright 2023 Associated Press. All rights reserved

 

 

2303798.jpgРоссияне не могут добиться успеха на поле боя, поэтому выбирают тактику террора местного населения. Отсюда массированные ракетные обстрелы, под которые недавно попали Николаев, Умань и Днепр. Такое моральное давление является составной частью информационно-психологической операции врага, которая в свою очередь входит в информационную войну. Полный текст новости

 

The Hill @thehill

posted at 11:39:43 UTC by The Hill via The Hill (Twitter)

Trump, Fox News have a new point of tension: Tucker Carlson trib.al/xrE1rRs

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Под Белгородом умер мобилизованный из Ленинградской области, сообщили источники в региональном управлении МВД России и в территориальном отделе полиции. Речь идет о 47-летнем военнослужащем Илье Б. из города Сланцы, он скончался в Алексеевке. Тело мужчины нашли в овраге в районе улицы Колхозная.

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1557006 Lenta.ru : Новости

 

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690972 РИА Новости

 

ВМС Великобритании начали расследование в связи с сообщениями об обнаруженных в пабе якобы секретных документах со схемой устройства новейшей подлодки HMS Anson, стоимость которой составляет 1,3 млрд фунтов стерлингов, сообщила The Guardian.

Издание со ссылкой на официального представителя британского флота пишет, что на самом деле речь идет о типовых документах, которые не представляют секретной информации, якобы они предназначены для учебы. Но расследование будет проведено очень тщательно, поскольку в британском флоте серьезно относятся к безопасности, передает ТАСС.

«Речь идет о типовых учебных документах, в которых нет секретной информации. Однако мы крайне серьезно относимся к вопросам безопасности и проведем расследование обстоятельств произошедшего», — сказал он.

Газета The Sun писала, что в туалете паба в Великобритании были обнаружены секретные бумаги, содержащие сведения о подводной лодке HMS Anson, стоимость которой составляет 1,3 млрд фунтов стерлингов.

По словам источников британских СМИ, обнаруженные документы являются частью руководства, которое в упрощенном виде описывает внутреннее устройство субмарины.

Ранее двух командиров подразделения военно-воздушных сил США временно отстранили от работы после масштабной утечки секретных документов.

The News And Times Information Network – Blogs By Michael Novakhov – thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com