7:23 PM 9/17/2017 – How 9/11 Changed America: For Better and for Worseby 20committee

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How 9/11 Changed America: For Better and for Worseby 20committee

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:21 PM

The XX Committee

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Today we commemorate the 16th anniversary of what Al-Qa’ida termed its Planes Operation, the most consequential terrorist attacks in history. That operation left 19 dead jihadists, 2,978 dead innocent victims, plus thousands of injured. Not to mention the World Trade Center complex annihilated, four jetliners destroyed, the Pentagon badly damaged, and a nation changed forever.

In Lower Manhattan and at the Pentagon – all rebuilt with appropriate memorials to that day – the usual solemn 9/11 remembrances will take place. Those who recall may think back, briefly, to that sunny Tuesday morning when the world changed. Some will speak of it. Just as my parents and their friends once bored me with their exact memories of where they were on November 22, 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, now my friends and I bore our children with precise recollections of 9/11.

With the passing of time we can see the Planes Operation and its impacts with a clarity that was previously out of reach. In the months after 9/11, when shock turned to an outrage that birthed a national unity which proved as intense as it was fleeting, a new era dawned for America in a long-term struggle against Islamist terrorism and extremism. How has that conflict panned out over the last 16 years?

In the first place, it ought to be noted that our Intelligence Community has done a commendable job of keeping mass-casualty terrorism away from our shores since 9/11. In particular, FBI-NSA teamwork, in near-seamless collaboration with close foreign intelligence partners, has foiled hundreds of terrorist plots “left of boom” as they say in the spy trade. Jihadists have executed exactly zero “big wedding” attacks in the United States in the last 16 years – and it’s not for any lack of trying.

Indeed, since 9/11 the FBI-NSA counterterrorism partnership has grown so effective at stopping jihadists before they kill that civil libertarians routinely complain that many of these would-be terrorists are harmless ne’er-do-wells and fantasists entrapped by government informants. This is a by-product of the success of our domestic counterterrorism in recent years.

Although jihadists, usually self-styled, have killed Americans at home since 9/11, most of these terrorists have been inspired – not directed – by violent co-religionists overseas. In a typical case, the worst of these attacks, the June 2016 slaughter at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub, killed 49 innocents; yet their murderer, Omar Mateen, a native-born American citizen, despite clearly being inspired by the Islamic State, was not directed by them except in his own diseased mind.

Read the rest at The Observer …

Filed under: EspionageHistoryStrategyTerrorismUSG

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American Tourists Doused With Acid In Marseilles, One Suspect Arrested by RT

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:21 PM

Eurasia Review

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Two American tourists are receiving hospital treatment for burns after being attacked by an unknown female at the Saint Charles train station in Marseilles, who hurled acid at the group of four young women.

The attack with hydrochloric acid occurred on Sunday shortly after 11am, the La Provence newspaper reported, while the group of four was waiting for their transit to Paris. Two of the women are receiving treatment for burns, including a possible eye injury, while the others are being treated for shock, a French official told AP.

One suspect, aged between 41 and 51 years old, has been taken into custody. Police say there does not seem to be a terrorist or religious motive, and the woman appears to be mentally unbalanced.

French prosecutors are not investigating the acid attack on four American women in Marseilles as an act of terror, AP later reported.

As Persian Gulf crisis persists, alarm in Washington deepensby Karen DeYoung

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:20 PM

National Security

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The Trump administration fears that the bitter dispute among allies will damage U.S. interests.

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No, We Cannot Shoot Down North Korea’s Missilesby Joe Cirincione

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:20 PM

Defense One – All Content

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In a test, SM-6 missiles fired from the guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) hit a target medium-range ballistic missile off Hawaii, Au. 29, 2017.

In wake of airstrike, US military moves to establish closer communication with Russian forces in Syria

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:19 PM

Stars And Stripes

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The Pentagon is taking additional steps to ensure that U.S. and Russian battlefield commanders are able to directly communicate with one another after an airstrike on U.S. proxy forces near Deir al-Zour, Syria, that wounded several fighters Saturday, the United States’ highest -ranking military officer said.

Trump and the United Nations: Reform or Die?by Zalmay Khalilzad

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:19 PM

The National Interest

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Zalmay Khalilzad

Politics, North America

President Trump is taking on a tough but necessary task at the UN.

President Donald Trump will be hosting a meeting on Monday in New York on reforming the United Nations. With that, the president is taking on a very tough but very necessary task. The institution is in serious need of reform but achieving that will be very difficult. Yet, unless it reforms substantially, the UN faces the prospect of becoming less relevant and having its very mission and existence questioned.

Promoting security, human rights, humanitarian assistance and sustainable development are the primary responsibility of the individual member states, and assisting members in these four areas is the core mission of the UN—including peacekeeping, assisting refugees, facilitating international agreements on important issues and prodding countries to carry out their obligation under international law. However, the UN apparatus has become unwieldy, bureaucratically overburdened, inefficient, ineffective and fiscally irresponsible. These problems need to fixed.

Since becoming Secretary General, Antonio Guterres has emphasized reform—his focus of effort and the proposals he has developed do not pertain to adjusting the organization’s mission. Rather, they focus solely on how it carries its responsibilities, with the goal of increasing the organization’s capacity to implements its current mission more effectively by becoming more integrated, more transparent and more accountable. The meeting is aimed at boosting his initiatives.

The Trump/Guterres event will be well received and there will be many positive statements in support of reform. However, the actual implementation of the reforms will face serious challenges.

A key challenge is disagreement among member states on what needs to be done. When it comes to what reform actually means, different countries and voting blocs have varying priorities. The United States and its allies want the United Nations to take greater initiative in reforming management to increase transparency, accountability, effectiveness and efficiency. Rising powers are eager to join the Security Council as permanent members, but are unwilling to embrace the management reforms necessary to reduce waste and increase efficiency and effectiveness, because those moves are unpopular with the developing countries whose votes they will need to achieve their Security Council aspiration.

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In wake of airstrike, U.S. military moves to establish closer communication with Russian forces in Syriaby Thomas Gibbons-Neff

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:11 PM

National Security

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Russia has denied taking part in the strike, despite a U.S. statement Saturday that specifically indicated Russian aircraft participated in the bombing.

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In Irma-devastated US Virgin Islands, resolve blends with worry of being forgotten

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:11 PM

Stars And Stripes

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Many in Coral Bay feel their plight was ignored after Irma reached Florida, their experience as Americans forgotten, as if the hurricane in the Virgin Islands didn’t count.

McCain Laments ‘Accident After Accident’ After Military Cuts – Bloomberg

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:11 PM

Cyber Warfare – Google News

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Bloomberg

McCain Laments ‘Accident After Accident’ After Military Cuts
Bloomberg
McCain, a Vietnam War veteran from a military family, has been a longtime critic of the automatic cuts in U.S. spending — including reductions in U.S. defense — known as sequestration that began in 2013 under an earlier deal to raise the country’s 

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U.S. considering closing its embassy in Cuba by Carol Morello

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:11 PM

National Security

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Tillerson said the move is “under review,” in response to apparent sonic attacks on U.S. diplomats at the mission.

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What Are ‘Juggalos’ and Why Are They Marching Against the FBI? by Nora Ellingsen

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:10 PM

Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

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On Saturday, the Juggalos marched on Washington. According to their website, they would “take our fight to the streets” this weekend to protest the FBI’s treatment of them. Which led a lot of people to ask, “What the heck is a Juggalo? And what’s their beef with the FBI?” The answer to these questions involves some interesting litigation over the FBI’s authority to identify gangs domestically.

First things first, who are the Juggalos? “Juggalos” are fans of the hip-hop duo Insane Clown Posse(ICP). Commentators liken them more to Deadheads than to an official, organized fan club. Juggalos are easily recognized by their signature look: clown-like face paint. The name Juggalo comes from ICP’s 1992 song “The Juggla” and has evolved into a term of endearment among fans of the group. According to the ACLU, which represents the Juggalos and ICP in the litigation discussed below, the federal government estimates that there are more than a million Juggalos in the United States. This weekend’s protest involved smaller numbers—in the hundreds or low thousands, according to a best guess by Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes, who went to this weekend’s protest and took the photos published in this post.

ICP was founded in 1991 by Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope, a duo who began performing a hard-core style of hip-hop called horrorcore. Wikipedia describes this music genre as hip-hop “based on horror-themed and often darkly transgressive lyrical content and imagery.” The ACLU, with gentler terminology, describes the genre as using “very harsh language to tell nightmare-like stories with an underlying message that horrible things happen to people who choose evil over good.” Although the group may not fit mainstream tastes, ICP has released two platinum and five gold albums. Along with its record label, ICP holds an annual music festival, called the Gathering of the Juggalos. According to Billboard, the event, which is now in its 18th year, drew 20,000 people in 2010. This year, a solid 8,000 fans showed up.

The Juggalos are upset because, in a 2011 report, the federal government classified the group as a gang. Because of this report, the Juggalos say,  members of their group have been the target of harassment by law enforcement. Individual members have also said that they have lost their jobs and custody of their children because of their affiliation with the group. In 2014, the group filed a lawsuit demanding that they be removed from the list. That case was dismissed last year, a decision that led to this weekend’s march.

The 2011 report is a product of the FBI’s National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC), which every two years releases a National Gang Threat Assessment (NGTR), now called the National Gang Report. Congress established the National Gang Intelligence Center in 2005 to act as a repository for and facilitate the sharing of gang-related information and intelligence between federal, state and local law enforcement. State and local law-enforcement agencies voluntarily report data on the growth, migration, criminal activity and association of gangs to the center, which incorporates the information into the publicly available National Gang Threat Assessment.

In 2011, the center released a version of the report, and for the first and last time included the Juggalos, describing the group as a “loosely-organized hybrid gang.” In a one-page overview, the report noted that Juggalos were recognized as a gang in only four states but that at least 21 states had identified criminal Juggalo subsets.

The national report also described a group that was committing low-level crimes but warned that small numbers of Juggalos were becoming more organized and violent:

Most crimes committed by Juggalos are sporadic, disorganized, individualistic, and often involve simple assault, personal drug use and possession, petty theft, and vandalism. However, open source reporting suggests that a small number of Juggalos are forming more organized subsets and engaging in more gang-like criminal activity, such as felony assaults, thefts, robberies, and drug sales.

The report cites two specific examples of violence. In January 2011, a Juggalo member shot and wounded a couple in Washington, and in 2010, two Juggalos were charged with beating and robbing an elderly homeless man.

According to NPR, Juggalos have been violent on at least two occasions since the 2011 report. In February of this year, a man in Wisconsin was sentenced for using a machete to cut off a woman’s finger and drinking her blood. In 2014, two Maryland men were charged with attempted murder after they tried to carve a Juggalo tattoo off their housemate’s arm before setting his arm on fire.

The FBI’s action does not carry any legal weight. While the report classifies the Juggalos as a gang, that classification is not a designation that, say, parallels the government’s authority to designate a foreign terrorist organization, an action that makes “material support” of the designated group a felony. The action does not prescribe—or even recommend—any particular course of action. The NGTR is just an intelligence product, meant to educate and facilitate information sharing.

In terms of analogies, the report is probably more similar to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence’s Global Threat Assessment than to the State Department’s designation of foreign terrorist organizations.

That said, it’s not hard to understand why Juggalos—most of whom see themselves as nothing more than music fans—protest their inclusion. While they haven’t been included in the national gang report since the 2011 edition, the group continues to litigate its inclusion in that document.

In January 2014, the ACLU filed a lawsuit against the Justice Department and the FBI on behalf of four Juggalos and the two members of ICP (performers Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope). The suit was filed in the Eastern District of Michigan, which covers ICP’s hometown. It alleged that the Juggalos, because of their inclusion in the National Gang Intelligence Center’s 2011 report, have been subject to harassment by law-enforcement officers. The complaint details the harassment: Several of the plaintiffs were repeatedly stopped and searched by law enforcement because of their Juggalo tattoos and clothing, it alleges. Another was told his application to join the U.S. military would be denied because of his Juggalo tattoo. And the two ICP performers complained that one of their concerts was canceled after local police called the venue and reported their alleged gang affiliation. The suit sought a declaratory judgement that federal designations of the Juggalos as a gang are unlawful.

The complaint alleged that the federal government’s designation of Juggalos as a “hybrid gang” violated the federal Administrative Procedure Act in several ways. First, the plaintiffs argued, the Justice Department and the FBI violated their constitutional rights of association, expression and due process under the First and Fifth Amendments, respectively. The plaintiffs also claimed that the agencies’ decision to classify Juggalos as a gang was “arbitrary and capricious.” Finally, they argued that the defendants violated criminal intelligence collection procedures.

The lawsuit began a winding path through the court system.

Initially, the lawsuit was dismissed in district court for lack of standing to bring the complaint. The court found that the federal government was not responsible for how local authorities use the National Gang Intelligence Center report because the assessment does not recommend any particular course of action for local law enforcement to follow. Because any adjudication on the merits would involve speculation about the decisions of third parties—for example, local law-enforcement agencies—the court found that the plaintiffs had not properly alleged constitutional standing.

But in September 2015 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the district court’s decision and reinstated the lawsuit, allowing the Juggalos’ claims to proceed because they asserted that the designation had caused them substantial harm.

One year later, in September 2016, the district court again dismissed the case. The court again reasoned that none of the consequences described in the complaint were caused by the defendants but were a result of “independent decision making by third parties.” In other words, the federal threat assessment document did not direct local law-enforcement officers to stop and search the plaintiffs. The court also ruled that the decision to include the Juggalos in the report was subject to agency discretion.

The case is on to its second appeal before the Sixth Circuit, and arguments are scheduled for October 11.

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What Are ‘Juggalos’ and Why Are They Marching Against the FBI? – Lawfare (blog)

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:10 PM

Fbi – Google News

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Lawfare (blog)

What Are ‘Juggalos’ and Why Are They Marching Against the FBI?
Lawfare (blog)
On Saturday, the Juggalos marched on Washington. According to their website, they would “take our fight to the streets” this weekend to protest the FBI’s treatment of them. Which led a lot of people to ask, “What the heck is a Juggalo? And what’s their 
Juggalos march in Washington to protest ‘gang’ label by FBISouth China Morning Post
Insane Clown Posse fans protest FBI ‘gang’ classificationNew York Post
Juggalos descend on D.C. to fight FBI gang distinction – USA TodayUSA TODAY
NBCNews.com –Newsweek –American Civil Liberties Union News and Information –American Civil Liberties Union
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Tillerson says military option will be “only one left” if diplomacy fails on North Korea – CBS News

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:10 PM

Cyber Warfare – Google News

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CBS News

Tillerson says military option will be “only one left” if diplomacy fails on North Korea
CBS News
U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday that “our military option will be the only one left” if diplomatic efforts fail when it comes to North Korea. … So this is also to assure the government of China that that is not our agenda either 
Tillerson on N. Korea: Military option will be only one left if diplomatic efforts failThe Hill

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US considering closing its embassy in Cuba – Washington Post

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 7:09 PM

Us National Security – Google News

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Washington Post

US considering closing its embassy in Cuba
Washington Post
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday that the United States is considering closing theU.S. Embassy in Havana in response to mysterious hearing problems that have left at least 21 employees with serious health issues. “We have it under 

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In wake of airstrike, U.S. military moves to establish closer communication with Russian forces in Syria

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 4:06 PM

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16.09.2017 15:22

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 11:12 AM

Public RSS-Feed Of Mike Nova. Created With The PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ At Http://Gplusrss.Com

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“Mnuchin is in the same boat. The treasury secretary served as national finance chair for Trump’s presidential campaign and on the Trump transition team. What’s more, Mnuchin has a personal relationship with Trump and his immediate family members, and has political relationships that extend to Trump transition advisers and campaign aides who could be affected by Mueller’s investigation. Pompeo has his own conflict challenge. A far-right Republica…

Uncovered Trump Organization Document Suggests Trump Really Was Putin’s Puppet

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 9:08 AM

IJR

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Along with the roiling investigation around the Trump campaign’s high-level meeting with Russian cutouts to discuss collusion, there have recently been a series of eyebrow-raising revelations about the once-planned Trump Tower Moscow, and one newly revealed document goes a long way toward connecting those dots.

It had previously been reported that plans for a luxury Trump property in Moscow were scrapped before his presidential campaign began, but a few weeks ago, it was revealed that Trump signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) for the deal while his campaign was ongoing. Now, CNN has obtained a copy of that LOI, which was later signed by Trump in January 2016.

Aside from the details of the deal, and the letter’s confirmation that Trump was definitely involved in business with Russia during his presidential campaign, the Oct. 13, 2015, email that accompanied it contained a fascinating detail. Felix Sater, the intermediary for the deal, openly suggested that Trump and Russian dictator Vladimir Putin coordinate their public comments, CNN reported (emphasis added):

Attached is the signed LOI, by Andrey Rozov. Please have Mr. Trump counter-sign, signed and sent back. Lets make this happen and build a Trump Moscow. And possibly fix relations between the countries by showing everyone that commerce & business are much better and more practical than politics. That should be Putin’s message as well, and we will help him agree on that message. Help world peace and make a lot of money, I would say that’s a great lifetime goal for us to go after.

It was right around this time, you may recall, that Trump and Putin began a very public verbal love-festthat included moments like this December interview, when Trump bashfully accepted Putin’s praise, bashed President Barack Obama in Putin’s favor, and defended his brutal repression in return:

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Trump’s pattern of behavior following this email is similar to that which followed the Trump Tower meeting, which intensifies the possibility that Trump was aware of both overtures, and willingly accepted them.

But this email also suggests that, like a great many other things, Hillary Clinton was right when she called Trump a puppet during her third presidential debate with him.

Relive Trump’s priceless reaction to that slam below, via CBS News.

Please note: This is a commentary piece. The views and opinions expressed within it are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of IJR.

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How the Trump administration’s secret efforts to ease Russia sanctions fell short

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 9:05 AM

Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

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In the early weeks of the Trump administration, former Obama administration officials and State Department staffers fought an intense, behind-the-scenes battle to head off efforts by incoming officials to normalize relations with Russia, according to multiple sources familiar with the events.

Unknown to the public at the time, top Trump administration officials, almost as soon as they took office, tasked State Department staffers with developing proposals for the lifting of economic sanctions, the return of diplomatic compounds and other steps to relieve tensions with Moscow.

These efforts to relax or remove punitive measures imposed by President Obama in retaliation for Russia’s intervention in Ukraine and meddling in the 2016 election alarmed some State Department officials, who immediately began lobbying congressional leaders to quickly pass legislation to block the move, the sources said.

“There was serious consideration by the White House to unilaterally rescind the sanctions,” said Dan Fried, a veteran State Department official who served as chief U.S. coordinator for sanctions policy until he retired in late February. He said in the first few weeks of the administration, he received several “panicky” calls from U.S. government officials who told him they had been directed to develop a sanctions-lifting package and imploring him, “Please, my God, can’t you stop this?”

Fried said he grew so concerned that he contacted Capitol Hill allies — including Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., the ranking minority member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee — to urge them to move quickly to pass legislation that would “codify” the sanctions in place, making it difficult for President Trump to remove them.

Tom Malinowski, who had just stepped down as President Obama’s assistant secretary of state for human rights, told Yahoo News he too joined the effort to lobby Congress after learning from former colleagues that the administration was developing a plan to lift sanctions — and possibly arrange a summit between Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin — as part of an effort to achieve a “grand bargain” with Moscow. “It would have been a win-win for Moscow,” said Malinowski, who only days before he left office announced his own round of sanctions against senior Russian officials for human rights abuses under a law known as the Magnitsky Act.

The previously unreported efforts by Fried and others to check the Trump administration’s policy moves cast new light on the unseen tensions over Russia policy during the early days of the new administration.

It also potentially takes on new significance for congressional and Justice Department investigators in light of reports that before the administration took office Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and his chief foreign policy adviser, Michael Flynn, discussed setting up a private channel of communications with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak — talks that appear to have laid the groundwork for the proposals that began circulating right after the inauguration.

A senior White House official confirmed that the administration began exploring changes in Russia sanctions as part of a broader policy review that is still ongoing. “We’ve been reviewing all the sanctions — and this is not exclusive to Russia,” the official said. “All the sanctions regimes have mechanisms built in to alleviate them. It’s been our hope that the Russians would take advantage of that” by living up to Moscow’s agreement to end the Ukraine conflict, but they did not do so.

To be sure, President Trump’s interest in improving relations with Moscow was hardly a secret during last year’s presidential campaign. “If we can make a great deal for our country and get along with Russia, that would be a tremendous thing,” Trump said in a April 28, 2016, Fox News interview. “I would love to try it.”

But there was nothing said in public about specific steps the new administration took toward reaching the kind of deal the president had talked about during the campaign — without requiring the Russians to acknowledge responsibility for the annexation of Crimea or Moscow’s “influence campaign” during the 2016 election.

Just days after President Trump took office, officials who had moved into the secretary of state’s seventh-floor office sent a “tasking” order to the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs to develop a menu of options to improve relations with Russia as part of a deal in exchange for Russian cooperation in the war against the Islamic State in Syria, according to two former officials. Those options were to include sanctions relief as well as other steps that were a high priority for Moscow, including the return of two diplomatic compounds — one on Long Island and the other on Maryland’s Eastern Shore — that were shut by President Obama on Dec. 29 on the grounds that they were being used for espionage purposes. (The return of the compounds is again being actively considered by the administration, according to a Washington Post report Thursday.) “Obviously, the Russians have been agitating about this,” the senior White House official said when asked about the compounds, or “dachas,” as the Russians call them. But it would be inaccurate to report there has been an agreement to return them without some reciprocal move on Moscow’s part.

Since this was the same State Department bureau that had helped develop the punitive measures in the first place, and actively pushed for them under the leadership of Assistant Secretary Victoria Nuland, who had just resigned, the tasking order left staffers feeling “deeply uncomfortable,” said one source, who asked not to be identified.

These concerns led some department officials to also reach out to Malinowski, an Obama political appointee who had just stepped down. Malinowski said he, like Fried, called Cardin and other congressional allies, including aides to Sen. John McCain, and urged them to codify the sanctions — effectively locking them in place — before Trump could lift them

The lobbying effort produced some immediate results: On Feb. 7, Cardin and Sen. Lindsay Graham introduced bipartisan legislation to bar the administration from granting sanctions relief without first submitting a proposal to do so for congressional review. “Russia has done nothing to be rewarded with sanctions relief,” Graham said in a statement at the time. If the U.S. were to lift sanctions without “verifiable progress” by Russia in living up to agreements in Ukraine, “we would lose all credibility in the eyes of our allies in Europe and around he world,” added Cardin in his own statement. (A spokesman for Cardin told Yahoo News in an emailed statement: “I can also confirm that the senator did hear from senior Obama officials encouraging him to take sanctions steps, but that he had already been considering it as well.”)

The proposed bill lost some of its urgency six days later when Flynn resigned as White House national security adviser following disclosures he had discussed political sanctions relief with Kislyak during the transition and misrepresented those talks to Vice President Mike Pence. After that, “it didn’t take too long for it to become clear that if they lifted sanctions, there would be a political firestorm,” Malinowski said.

But the political battles over the issue are far from over. Cardin, McCain and Graham are separately pushing another sanctions bill — imposing tough new measures in response to Russia’s election interference. The measures have so far been blocked for consideration within the Senate Foreign Relations Committee by its chairman, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., who says he wants to first hear the administration’s position on the issue.

In the meantime, Malinowksi said he is concerned that there may be other, less public ways the administration can undermine the Russian sanctions. He noted that much of their force results from parallel sanctions imposed by the European Union, whose members must unanimously renew them each year.

“I had this nightmare vision of [White House senior adviser ] Steve Bannon or [National Security Council staffer] Sebastian Gorka calling in the Hungarian ambassador and telling them President Trump would not be displeased” if his country opposed the renewal of sanctions, he said.

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Sen. Al Franken on new book ‘Giant of the Senate,’ Hillary Clinton’s election loss and Trump’s decision on Paris Climate Agreement

Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric spoke with Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) about his new book called “Giant of the Senate.” They also talked about President Trump’s decision to back out of the Paris Climate Agreement, and how Hillary Clinton should “move on” from her 2016 presidential election loss.

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Trump’s Moscow Tower and Back-Channel Ukraine Dossier: Both … – Just Security

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 8:13 AM

Felix Sater – Google News

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Just Security

Trump’s Moscow Tower and Back-Channel Ukraine Dossier: Both …
Just Security
Congressional investigators are reportedly exploring any connections between two deals brokered by Donald Trump’s lawyer Michael Cohen and Felix Sater …
Trump Lawyer Michael Cohen Set to Meet with Senate Behind …LawNewz

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On MSNBC Steven Harper Talks About the Moscow Tower Deal That ‘Will Get Donald Elected’ – BillMoyers.com

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 8:13 AM

Felix Sater – Google News

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BillMoyers.com

On MSNBC Steven Harper Talks About the Moscow Tower Deal That ‘Will Get Donald Elected’
BillMoyers.com
Felix Sater, wrote a series of emails to Mr. Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, in which he boasted about his ties to Mr. Putin. He predicted that building a Trump Tower in Moscow would highlight Mr. Trump’s savvy negotiating skills and be a political boon 
Russia Sought A Broad Reset With Trump, Secret Document ShowsBuzzFeed News

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How Donald Trump Lied to Conceal His Moscow Business Partner – Mother Jones

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 8:12 AM

Felix Sater – Google News

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Mother Jones

How Donald Trump Lied to Conceal His Moscow Business Partner
Mother Jones
On December 2, 2015, during an interview with an Associated Press reporter, Trump was asked about his relationship with a fellow named Felix Sater. Trump, who was then the front-runner in the GOP presidential nomination contest, replied, “Felix Sater 
Marcus: Trump downplays his financial interests in RussiaBloomington Pantagraph
Trump Tower Moscow Plan, Russia Sanctions Rollback Linked In New Trump Collusion Evidence, Expert SaysThe Inquisitr
Russia Sought A Broad Reset With Trump, Secret Document ShowsBuzzFeed News

all 111 news articles »

‘Help world peace and make a lot of money’: Here’s the letter of intent to build a Trump Tower Moscow – Yahoo News

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 8:12 AM

Felix Sater – Google News

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Yahoo News

‘Help world peace and make a lot of money’: Here’s the letter of intent to build a Trump Tower Moscow
Yahoo News
A letter of intent forwarded by Russian-born businessman Felix Sater to the Trump Organization’s lawyer at the time, Michael Cohen, outlines the terms of a licensing agreement to purchase property to build a “Trump World Tower Moscow.” Sater sent the 
Uncovered Trump Organization Document Suggests Trump Really Was Putin’s PuppetIndependent Journal Review

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Uncovered Trump Organization Document Suggests Trump Really Was Putin’s Puppet – Independent Journal Review

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 8:12 AM

Felix Sater – Google News

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Independent Journal Review

Uncovered Trump Organization Document Suggests Trump Really Was Putin’s Puppet
Independent Journal Review
Along with the roiling investigation around the Trump campaign’s high-level meeting with Russian cutouts to discuss collusion, there have recently been a series of eyebrow-raising revelations about the once-planned Trump Tower Moscow, and one newly …

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Who Is Felix Sater, and Why Is Donald Trump So Afraid of Him? – The Nation.

Sunday September 17th, 2017 at 8:12 AM

Felix Sater – Google News

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The Nation.

Who Is Felix Sater, and Why Is Donald Trump So Afraid of Him?
The Nation.
Every time someone asks Donald Trump if he knows Felix Sater, his Russian-born, Brooklyn-bred former business associate, Trump draws a blank. Despite the fact that Sater worked on and off for a decade with the Trump Organization, and despite his recent …
‘Help world peace and make a lot of money’: Here’s the letter of intent to build a Trump Tower MoscowBusiness Insider
Document details scrapped deal for Trump Tower MoscowCNN
Not at all quiet for Trump on the Russia frontSt. Louis American
Raw Story –Metro US –Telegraph.co.uk
all 13 news articles »


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