Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites): Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Will We Ever See Mueller’s Report on Trump? Maybe.

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WASHINGTON — The swirl of speculation surrounding the Russia investigation often assumes that the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, will release a report of his findings that will serve as the definitive explanation of how Russia interfered in the 2016 election and whether President Trump or his associates coordinated with Moscow.

But there is no such guarantee. The law does not require the Justice Department to release a report, and Mr. Mueller has been silent on the issue. Mr. Trump’s nominee for attorney general, William P. Barr, said at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday that he wanted to release as much of what Mr. Mueller found as possible. But he said he needed to learn more about the report and the regulations that govern his releasing information from it before deciding what to do about disclosing the findings.

That answer did not satisfy leading Senate Democrats, who said on Wednesday that they would oppose Mr. Barr’s nomination unless he agreed to release the entire report Mr. Mueller produces, except for redactions of sensitive national security information.

Why do people assume that a Mueller report is coming?

Because the government has issued plenty of big reports after important investigations into national catastrophes and scandals. Commissions that investigated the Sept. 11 attacks and the failure to find weapons of mass destruction after the invasion of Iraq, for example, produced book-length public reports that became part of the historical record.

Similarly, Ken Starr, the independent counsel who investigated President Bill Clinton over the Whitewater and Monica Lewinsky scandals, gave Congress a long report that lawmakers voted to make public. It provided a detailed narrative description of the evidence, including lurid sexual details, and extensive legal analysis of potential crimes by the president.

That does not always happen. Nearly a half-century ago, the special counsel investigating President Richard M. Nixon over the Watergate scandal, Leon Jaworski, had a grand jury send to Congress a terse report containing spare factual statements with citations of evidence and no legal analysis. This report, known as the “Road Map,” was kept secret until last year.

But Mr. Mueller is working under a different set of rules than any of those investigators.

What do the current rules say?

In 1999, partly in reaction to perceptions that Mr. Starr had overreached, Congress let the independent counsel law expire. The Justice Department wrote new regulations allowing for special counsels who can investigate high-level executive-branch wrongdoing with some day-to-day independence but ultimately under the supervision of the attorney general.

The officials who wrote the regulations sought to prevent the sort of “extravagant” steps Mr. Starr had taken in writing his report, according to Neal Katyal, a former Justice Department official who drafted the rules.

“There is no doubt that when you are writing regs like that in the midst of a really public thing like the Starr Report, it’s going to influence your thinking, and definitely it did,” he said. “There were concerns about the privacy violations that occurred in the Starr Report.”

The regulation instructs Mr. Mueller to give the attorney general “a confidential report” when he has finished his investigation explaining his decisions about whom to prosecute and whom not to charge. The attorney general, in turn, must send a report to Congress explaining why the work has concluded. The attorney general is also free to decide that issuing that report would be in the public interest, as long as it is released lawfully.

The Justice Department’s explanation of the special counsel regulations, filed in the Federal Register in 1999, criticized the old independent counsel law’s system where prosecutors filed reports directly to Congress that typically were made public, as in the Starr investigation.

Instead, officials called for special counsels to write confidential summaries to the attorney general about their charging decisions and for the attorney general’s report to Congress to be a “brief notification” that the investigation was closed and why.

To be sure, Mr. Mueller has already disclosed significant investigative findings by writing and unsealing lengthy narrative indictments, especially of Russians involved in the operations to manipulate American social media and hack Democratic emails. But that method has limited value for understanding the actions of people he does not indict.

How does Barr view the issue?

He has said he is still trying to figure it out.

While Mr. Barr repeatedly emphasized that he wants to make public as much information as he can about the special counsel investigation, he stopped short of making commitments — emphasizing that certain rules might hamstring him and that he had not yet been briefed on Mr. Mueller’s investigation. He also said he wanted to speak to Mr. Mueller and Rod J. Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general who appointed the special counsel, to see what they were already thinking.

“I don’t know what, at the end of the day, what will be releasable,” he said at his confirmation hearing. “I don’t know what Bob Mueller is writing.”

Mr. Barr left open possibilities including drafting his own summary of the findings, should he be confirmed as attorney general, as expected.

“There are different reports at work here,” Mr. Barr said. “Under the current regulations, the special counsel report is confidential, and the report that goes public would be a report by the attorney general.”

That answer failed to placate Democrats and left confusion about his ultimate intentions. On Wednesday, one of the witnesses at his hearing, Neil Kinkopf, a Georgia State University law professor and former Justice Department official in the Obama and Clinton administrations, flagged the ambiguity with concern, saying Mr. Barr seemed to be interpreting the regulation to mean that the attorney general should release his own report, not turn over Mr. Mueller’s.

What information might Barr withhold?

Whether Mr. Barr ends up relaying a redacted version of Mr. Mueller’s report or instead writes his own, he most likely will have to keep grand jury testimony secret.

He also may withhold classified information that could reveal intelligence sources and methods still being used to spy on the Russian government, like any moles or wiretaps.

Mr. Barr also noted that the Justice Department typically keeps confidential so-called declination memos where prosecutors explain what they uncovered about anyone they decide not to prosecute.

On Wednesday, Mr. Kinkopf noted that the Justice Department had taken the position that sitting presidents could not be indicted while in office. If Mr. Barr strictly enforces the view that department policy forbids putting out negative information about people whom prosecutors declined to charge, he said, that would prevent Justice Department officials from releasing information about Mr. Trump’s actions.

Mr. Katyal said there was one way around that. The special counsel regulation requires Mr. Barr to tell Congress about any instance in which he overruled a step Mr. Mueller proposed, so if Mr. Mueller were to suggest indicting Mr. Trump, the attorney general report would have to discuss that.

How else can we find out what Mueller learned?

For one thing, information could leak to the news media. If any Mueller report is leaked, that would most likely cause a firestorm, especially if it contained unredacted classified information and evidence subject to grand-jury secrecy rules.

The House Judiciary Committee, now controlled by Democrats, could also seek to subpoena the report. If Mr. Trump asserts executive privilege to avoid turning it over, the House could ask a judge to order it handed over.

House Democrats could similarly seek to subpoena Mr. Mueller to testify about his findings. Mr. Trump could also seek to gag Mr. Mueller by invoking executive privilege, although it is not clear that he would succeed.

Could Trump block or edit a report to Congress?

The president’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani has suggested that in addition to potentially invoking executive privilege, the White House may seek to edit a report that will go to Congress “so we can correct it if they’re wrong.”

Mr. Barr said on Tuesday that he would not allow such a move: “That will not happen.”

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites)


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Top stories – Google News: Rain spotted on Saturn’s moon Titan, which may be home to alien life – Fox News

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Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites): Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: The Early Edition: January 17, 2019

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Michael_Novakhov
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Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Here’s today’s news.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani said yesterday that “collusion” could have taken place between Trump’s presidential campaign and Russian officials, but added that if it did occur Trump himself was not involved. “I never said there was no collusion between the campaign, or people in the campaign,” Giuliani said during an interview with CNN’s Chris Cuomo on his “Cuomo Prime Time” show, Brent D. Griffiths reports at POLITICO.

“There is not a single bit of evidence the president of the United States committed the only crime you could commit here … conspiring with the Russians to hack the [Democratic National Committee],” Giuliani said, adding “the president did not collude with the Russians.” Michael Burke reports at the Hill.

Giuliani shrugged off recent revelations that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort had shared polling data with Kremlin-linked associate Konstantin Kilimnik, telling Cuomo: “[Manafort] was only there for six months or four months … the polling data was given to everybody … I mean he shouldn’t have given it to them … it’s wrong to give it to them.” Giuliani added that he and Trump had no idea that Manafort had shared polling data with Kilimnik until it was inadvertently revealed in a court document filed by Manafort’s lawyers, Julia Arciga reports at The Daily Beast.

Giuliani challenged special counsel Robert Mueller to provide evidence of wrongdoing by the President. “Let’s see if he’s got anything – I challenge him to show us some evidence that the President was involved in anything approaching criminal conduct,” Giuliani remarked, adding “if you want to do an ethics investigation fine, do an ethics investigation … but you don’t need a special prosecutor for that.” Caroline Kelly reports at CNN.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov yesterday ridiculed claims that Trump could have worked for Russia’s interests, labeling the accusations as “absurd” and “stupid.” Lavrov claimed that U.S. newspaper reports – regarding Trump’s withholding of details of his meetings with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin and an F.B.I. investigation of whether he was working on Moscow’s behalf – reflected a decline in journalistic standards, also dismissing the prospect of releasing the minutes of the Trump-Putin meetings and claiming that to do so would defy the basic culture of diplomacy. Vladimir Isachenkov reports at the AP.

“This is stupid … what is there to comment?” Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov commented when asked to address whether Trump had or was working with Russia. Reuters reports.

Ranking members of the Senate Foreign Relations and Armed Services Committees Sens. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) and Jack Reed (D-R.I.) are demanding access to interpreters present at all of Trump’s meetings with Putin since he took office. In a letter sent to the president yesterday, the pair state that “in light of the continuing level of secrecy shrouding your interactions with the Russian leader, we insist that the interpreters for these interactions, especially the individual who interpreted for your meeting with President Putin in Helsinki, be made immediately available for interviews with the relevant committees in Congress,” Tal Axelrod reports at the Hill.

Belarusian model Anastasia Vashukevich has been deported from Thailand. Vashukevich became embroiled in the Trump-Russia developments last year when she claimed that she had ­recorded meetings between ­Russian metals magnate Oleg Deripaska and unspecified Americans in 2016 to discuss Russian interference in the U.S. election, Reuters reports.

TRUMP-RUSSIA: OPINION AND ANALYSIS

Why do people assume that a Mueller report is coming, what do the current rules say about such a report, how does nominee for attorney general William Barr view the issue and could Trump block or edit a report to Congress? Michael S. Schmidt and Charlie Savage provide an analysis at the New York Times.

“Barr didn’t answer the key question of whether he’d make Mueller’s final report public,” Joshua Gelzer writes at Just Security, providing an analysis of Barr’s position based on what he did say and the relevant law.

“Warning lights should have been flashing early on during William P. Barr’s confirmation hearing on Tuesday” E.J. Dionne Jr comments at the Washington Post, arguing that Barr’s confirmation served as “one heck of a smokescreen” aimed at making Senators forget his June 8, 2018 memo advocating an expansive view of presidential authority.

U.S.-RUSSIA RELATIONS

The U.S. has rejected Moscow’s offer to inspect a new Russian missile suspected of violating the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty (I.N.F.,) and warned that it would suspend observance of the agreement on Feb. 2, giving six-month notice of a complete withdrawal. Under-Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security – Andrea Thompson – confirmed the U.S. intention to withdraw after a meeting with a Russian delegation in Geneva, which both sides characterized as a failure, Julian Borger reports at the Guardian.

“A static display of the system can’t tell me how far that missile is going to go,” Thompson said in a telephone interview from Brussels, where she was briefing U.S. allies. She added that Moscow’s ability to pick “the system and the missile and [control] the environment of the test” would also impede an objective assessment, Michael R. Gordon and Thomas Grove report at the Wall Street Journal.

The gap between Trump and his administration’s stance toward Russia is “unprecedented,” Michael McFaul comments at the Washington Post.

SYRIA

Several people including civilians and U.S. troops were killed yesterday in the northern Syrian town of Manjib after a suicide attack struck near a U.S.-led coalition patrol. The U.S. Department of Defense announced that four Americans – two soldiers, a Pentagon civilian and a contractor – were killed in the attack, Al Jazeera reports.

Islamic State group (I.S.I.S.) has claimed responsibility for the attack, which killed a total of 16 people according to local groups, and comes following President Trump’s December decision that the U.S. withdraw forces from Syria. Daniella Cheslow and Francesca Paris report at NPR.

“We’ll stay in the region and we’ll stay in the fight to ensure that I.S.I.S. does not rear its ugly head again,” U.S. Vice President Mike Pence told a gathering in Washington of U.S. ambassadors stationed around the world just hours after the attack. “Thanks to the leadership of this commander-in-chief and the courage and sacrifice of our coalition partners, we’re now actually able to hand off the fight against I.S.I.S. in Syria to our coalition partners and we are bringing our troops home … the caliphate has crumbled and I.S.I.S. has been defeated,” AFP reports.

“President Trump and I condemn the terrorist attack in Syria that claimed American lives and our hearts are with the loved ones of the fallen,” Pence said in a statement, adding “we honor their memory and we will never forget their service and sacrifice.” In a separate statement, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders offered “our deepest sympathies and love” to the families of the troops who were killed,” though the president himself has yet to publicly address the soldiers’ deaths, Jordain Fabian reports at the Hill.

Yesterday’s violence has provoked renewed scrutiny of Trump’s withdrawal decision. Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) commented that Trump’s withdrawal announcement “set in motion enthusiasm by the enemy we’re fighting,” adding “I saw this in Iraq … and I’m now seeing it in Syria,” Eric Schmitt, Ben Hubbard and Rukmini Callimachi report at the New York Times.

The Kurdish-dominated Syrian Democratic Forces (S.D.F.) has said it will support efforts to establish a safe zone in northeastern Syria. The coalition of armed groups – backed by the U.S. and led by the Kurdish Y.P.G. – said the zone must be supported by “international guarantees…that would prevent foreign intervention,” in an apparent reference to proposed Turkish operations in the region, Al Jazeera reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out 469 airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria between Dec. 16 and Dec. 29. [Central Command]

SYRIA: OPINION AND ANALYSIS

An analysis of the situation in northern Syria in the wake of yesterday’s attack is provided by Kimberly Dozier, Erin Banco and Roy Gutman at The Daily Beast

“Manbij … is a nexus of the interests and conflicts of the many players in Syria,” Karen DeYoung writes in an analysis at the Washington Post, explaining that while “the Islamic State was the one actor that appeared to have been eliminated from the contest … [yesterday’s] bombing showed that it is likely to remain a force to be reckoned with in Syria for the foreseeable future.”

Yesterday’s attack serves as “a vivid reminder of the confused and confusing state of U.S. policy in Syria,” Peter Bergen comments at CNN, arguing that the blame falls squarely at the feet of the president.

YEMEN                           

The U.N. Security Council yesterday unanimously voted in favor of deploying up to 75 observers to monitor the “fragile” ceasefire in Yemen’s key port city of Hodeidah – a ceasefire that went into effect late last month following U.N.-brokered talks in Sweden. The U.N. News Centre reports.

The U.K.-drafted resolution establishes a U.N. political mission to oversee implementation of the cease-fire and redeployment of forces agreement, giving a green light for the monitors to be deployed for an initial period of six months. Britain’s U.N. Ambassador Karen Pierce described the development as “an important moment for the U.N.,” Edith M. Lederer reports at the AP.

CHINA

Federal prosecutors are pursuing a criminal investigation of Chinese tech giant Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from U.S. business partners, including technology used by Huawei’s U.S. counterpart T-Mobile to test smartphones, according to people familiar with the matter. The sources added that the probe is reportedly at an advanced stage and could lead to an indictment in the near future, Dan Strumpf, Nicole Hong and Aruna Viswanatha report at the Wall Street Journal.

The investigation arises in part from civil lawsuits against Huawei, including a case in which a Seattle jury found Huawei liable for misappropriating robotic technology from T-Mobile’s Bellevue, Wash. laboratory, Jacqueline Thomsen reports at the Hill.

“The real intent of the United States is to employ its state apparatus in every conceivable way to suppress and block out China’s high-tech companies,” said Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson Hua Chunying at a regular news briefing today. Such an investigation would not only be “a violation of free and fair business competition but a violation rule of law,” Chunying added, Lily Kuo reports at the Guardian.

The U.S. State Department has called China’s imposition of the death sentence on Canadian alleged drug smuggler Robert Schellenberg “politically motivated.” Deputy spokesperson Robert Palladino issued a statement yesterday claiming that U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland had spoken the previous day and “expressed their concerns about the arbitrary detentions and politically motivated sentencing of Canadian nationals,” Al Jazeera reports.

The U.S. Department of Defense is increasingly worried that China’s growing military prowess could embolden Beijing to launch a full-out attack on Taiwan. Lara Seligman explains at Foreign Policy.

The KOREAN PENINSULA

North Korea’s top envoy Kim Jong-chol boarded a flight in Beijing for Washington today, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Kim are expected to meet tomorrow to discuss a second summit meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, with denuclearization talks between the two powers having stalled, Reuters reports.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence told U.S. ambassadors yesterday that North Korea has failed to take any substantive steps to give up its nuclear weapons, even as Trump and Kim move toward a follow-up summit. “While the president has started a promising dialogue with Chairman Kim,” Pence told the gathering at the State Department, “we still await concrete steps by North Korea to dismantle the nuclear weapons that threaten our people and our allies in the region,” David E. Sanger reports at the New York Times.

MISSILE DEFENSE REVIEW

The Trump administration is seeking to expand the scope and sophistication of U.S. missile defenses on a scale not seen since former President Reagan’s “Star Wars” initiative in a new strategy that Trump plans to roll out personally today alongside military leaders at the Pentagon. Paul Sconne reports at the Washington Post.

The “long-awaited” missile defense review recommends additional deployments of anti-missile systems at home, abroad and possibly in space, according to a senior administration official. The two-year review, ordered by the president just days after he took office, calls for a third suite of interceptors located on U.S. territory to defend against intercontinental ballistic missiles, also recommending additional study of the “controversial” idea of placing weapons in orbit to strike enemy missiles launched from Earth, Bryan Bender reports at POLITICO.

“A space-based layer of sensors is something we are looking at to help get early warning and tracking and discrimination of missiles when they are launched,” the official told reporters. However, the official stressed that the military was only examining the question of whether such a system could work, and that no decisions had been made so far. The BBC reports, with additional analysis provided by Jonathan Marcus.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Claif.) yesterday asked President Trump to scrap or delay his Jan. 29 State of the Union address amid the partial government shutdown, in an “extraordinary” request intensifying the partisan battle over Trump’s proposed border wall. In a letter to Trump, Pelosi cited security concerns as her reason for proposing that the president postpone the annual ritual of addressing a joint session of Congress in a prime time televised speech, Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Nicholas Fandos report at the New York Times.

Authoritarian and populist leaders face an “increasingly powerful human rights pushback,” according to an “influential” annual survey of global rights by N.G.O. Human Rights Watch. Peter Beaumont reports at the Guardian.

“What Happens if [U.S. Supreme Court Justice] Ruth Bader Ginsburg Remains Too Sick to Work?” Daniel Hemel provides an analysis at POLITICO Magazine. 

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Security Intelligence: Board Directors Can’t Afford to Ignore Cybersecurity Risk

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Co-authored by Mark Whitecavage.

As organizations rush to adopt new digital channels, big data, advanced analytics, and emerging technologies such as blockchain, artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing, they face new risks that may be difficult to quantify today.

The obvious challenge with emerging risk is the lack of historical perspective and measurement. Position credit risk against cyber, for example, and you’ll realize that credit professionals have the benefit of leveraging time-tested practices and numerous economic cycles as a basis for understanding risk quantification in familiar metrics. Credits that score a 6.2 (expected frequency of default) will, on average, lose a greater percentage of principle balance as compared to credits scoring 3.2, and this is a known quantity.

Now consider cyber risk in light of the imperative to embrace new technologies to remain competitive and the gradual emergence of risk mitigation strategies to match new technologies. Put simply, the unmanaged cybersecurity risk of tomorrow is the unintended consequence of today’s revolution.

Weighing the Benefits of Technology Against Cybersecurity Risk

New technology enables value creation, generates process efficiencies, and allows companies to assimilate and analyze information at an unprecedented speed. This creates numerous opportunities to drive substantive improvement for the public good. For instance, AI tools enable health care professionals to quickly and accurately assist doctors in their diagnosis and treatment of serious illnesses. Similarly, AI applications in the financial industry help mitigate bank fraud and other financial crimes and combat cyber risk.

However, cybercriminals have access to this same technology, which they use to launch attacks and breach corporate networks to steal or damage information. This, combined with the mass digitization of data, growth of internet of things (IoT) deployments and widespread adoption of AI, is straining security resources like nothing we’ve ever seen. Juniper Research forecast the number of records stolen by cybercriminals to reach 5 billion in 2020, and Cybersecurity Ventures predicted that cybercrime will cost the world $6 trillion annually by 2021, up from $3 trillion in 2015.

Continuous improvement has never been more crucial to cybersecurity risk management. The worst thing you can do is remain static or get comfortable with the status quo. The failure to reassess and invest in your strategy, evolve your practices, educate leaders and employees, and advance risk technology in lockstep with new business applications puts companies and even national economies at risk.

Cybercrime has evolved into a well-organized, well-funded industry that focuses all its attention on penetrating enterprise networks to disrupt, steal, extort and exploit sensitive data. That said, many of the incidents that have made the news have nothing to do with threat actors; instead, they are the result of human error or malicious insiders, which presents a unique type of risk management challenge.

Either way, a reactive and siloed approach to cyber risk management limits effectiveness. The increasing volume and spectrum of threats necessitates detection, management and mitigation strategies that are proactive, adaptable and offensive in nature. Most importantly, these strategies must engage all elements of senior leadership.

Part of the problem is that technology has advanced faster than risk mitigation practices and investments. In many instances, cyber risk management is compartmentalized with technology functions, not widely understood by senior leadership or overtly linked to business strategy. Confronting this new risk means that every member of the senior leadership team, board of directors and company staff must make an investment in understanding and managing cyber risk.

Do You Understand the Risks Facing Your Business?

The more aggressive a firm’s digital and data-driven business strategies are, the greater the need to ensure that cyber risk is understood at the senior executive and board levels. This is the only way to facilitate a healthy and informed dialogue about business strategies and technology deployments with the appropriate risk appetite, safety considerations and governance. Of course, this task becomes more complicated as more technologies are adopted and integrated into the IT environment.

The widespread adoption of big data and advanced analytics will make it increasingly difficult for companies to manage or govern the volume of data they are trying to utilize. This is already a problem for some regulated financial market data providers; datasets and the products derived from them have outrun firms’ ability to map, manage and quality-control the data.

Cloud is another notable example. Many firms are rushing to move workloads to a hybrid cloud environment, which introduces new risks in multiple forms and raises myriad questions, including:

  • Where is the data?

  • What controls will be provided by each cloud service provider (CSP) and what must be provided by the firm?

  • How can the firm risk-assess and performance-manage each CSP?

  • How can the firm implement an effective risk dashboard across data types and providers, both on and off premises?

  • How can the firm demonstrate regulatory compliance effectively amid rapid change in the industry?

In addition, digital channels, bots and robo-advisors are being used at an accelerating pace. Like other emerging technologies, these expose consumers to new risks, and providers face scrutiny for poor outcomes. Understandably, consumers are not ready for these risks, and they simply do not know how to protect themselves in a world of connected devices, smart appliances and mobile banking. In response to this demand for open banking, and to stimulate competition in payments, the European Union (EU) issued a new Payment Service Directive (PSD2), which requires all financial institutions to share their customer and payment data in a standardized format. This open banking era introduces new obstacles to effective implementation and meeting both regulators’ and customers’ expectations of availability and ease of use.

Finally, the IoT brings countless new endpoints — and countless new microvulnerabilities — to the enterprise. It also exponentially multiplies the volume of data to be handled, complicates operating models, and makes it hard to map concerning data and risks. Consider technologies such as smart homes, connected cars and power grids; attacks on these systems could have physical, even life-threatening consequences that go far beyond the cost of noncompliance and disruption.

The New Regulatory Landscape Demands More of Leadership

The level of regulatory scrutiny and public awareness of cyber risk is rising and, along with it, expectations that companies will appropriately address these risks. Consider the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which gives consumers more control over their personal data, mandates that vendors build data protection safeguards into products and services, and places strict requirements on companies that manage EU citizens’ personal data. Failure to comply could carry fines up to 20 million euros or 4 percent of total worldwide turnover.

Another example is the New York State Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) regulation 23 NYCRR Part 500, which holds the board responsible for overseeing and certifying compliance with appropriate security standards. As mentioned above, PSD2 addressed payment systems and their security requirements for registration under a new set of conditions and other criteria enacted by member states on Jan. 13, 2018. Finally, the California Legislature recently approved the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which will take effect in 2020. This new legislation, the strictest in the U.S., gives consumers rights related to how their data is managed and sold and imposes obligations on the holders of this data.

As you can see, cybersecurity risk is a real business risk and must be managed holistically as enterprise risk rather than delegated to technical functions. Chief information security officers (CISOs), risk and compliance officers, technology managers and line-of-business leaders must own risk collectively, and it must be built into and considered a crucial component of the business strategy.

To accomplish this, top management and the board must engage in regular dialogue around cyber risks and business strategy and recognize them as inextricably linked. Investment in one necessitates investment in the other. This approach enables business and security leaders to replace defensive strategies with offensive capabilities and maintain an open, honest and direct dialogue about risk. Most importantly, it helps these leaders coordinate and prepare to play their roles when a security incident strikes.

The post Board Directors Can’t Afford to Ignore Cybersecurity Risk appeared first on Security Intelligence.

Security Intelligence

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites): “deutsche bank and trump” – Google News: European markets drop as SocGen warns on Q4 revenues – MarketWatch

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European markets drop as SocGen warns on Q4 revenues  MarketWatch

European indexes were in the red on Thursday, as French bank Société Générale SA announced it expected its fourth-quarter capital markets revenues to fall by …

“deutsche bank and trump” – Google News

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites)


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Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites): Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Charles and Jared Kushner Family, Mob, and Abwehr – Google Search

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Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from “Charles and Jared Kushner Family, Mob, and Abwehr” – Google News.

Story image for Charles and Jared Kushner Family, Mob, and Abwehr from Daily Mail

The spy who stopped Labour winning the 1924 general election: MI6 …

Daily MailOct 11, 2015
… the Abwehr [German military intelligence] Russian section,’ according to … ill with tuberculosis, wanted to move with his family from Berlin to …

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites)


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Top stories – Google News: Bill and Melinda Gates: World’s youngest are being saved by global health funds – Axios

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Bill and Melinda Gates: World’s youngest are being saved by global health funds  Axios

Global health funds play a key role in improving the world’s health — with the deaths of children under 5 dropping by more than 50% over the past couple …

View full coverage on Google News

Top stories – Google News


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Miley Cyrus, Metallica, Foo Fighters and more stars gather to honor the late Chris Cornell

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Many from Metallica and the Foo Fighters rocked on with electrifying performances as family members gave heartfelt speeches in memory of the late Chris Cornell.

FOX News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Facebook removes 512 Russian accounts and pages that were spreading disinformation

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Facebook uncovered and cut ties with hundreds of fake accounts tied to Russia that were engaging in inauthentic behavior, the tech giant announced Thursday.

FOX News

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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Commuter train slams into car moments after 96-year-old driver is rescued

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A 96-year-old Illinois woman was rescued Monday night by a police officer and two Good Samaritans who carried her out of her car moments before a Metra train smashed into it, reports said.

FOX News

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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): Reuters: World News: UK Labour leader says any new Brexit referendum can’t be a re-run of 2016

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Any new referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union cannot simply be a re-run of the 2016 vote, British opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said on Thursday, adding that Labour policy on a new referendum would not be set by him alone.

Reuters: World News

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1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): Russia | The Guardian: Facebook removes hundred of pages ‘linked to Russian site’

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Social network says it has taken down 289 pages connected to Kremlin-backed news website

Facebook has removed hundreds of pages believed to be connected to the Kremlin-backed Sputnik news website for allegedly breaching its rules.

The Facebook pages, which were targeted at individuals in former Soviet satellite states, either pretended to be independent news services or had names designed to appeal to fans of particular individuals, regions, or foods.

Related: Putin honours Serbian leader as he attacks west’s Balkans role

Continue reading…

Russia | The Guardian

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Alabama man repeatedly stuffed child in clothes dryer, turned it on, police say

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An Alabama man was arrested last week after being accused of trapping a young child in a clothes dryer on multiple occasions — and sometimes turning the machine on, authorities said.

FOX News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites): 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites): Donald Trump | The Guardian: Thursday US briefing: Britain in Brexit deadlock as May clings on

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How the shutdown affects a small rural town … US plans new space sensors for missile defence … The plant-focused diet that could save the world

Good morning, I’m Tim Walker with today’s essential stories.

Disastrous week. On today’s podcast, May’s former director of strategy Chris Wilkins and the Guardian’s Brussels bureau chief Daniel Boffey explain how Brexit has unravelled.

What now? The Guardian’s political correspondent Peter Walker examines the options for Brexit after the collapse of May’s deal.

State of the Union. The House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi, has asked Donald Trump to delay his State of the Union address, scheduled for 29 January, or deliver it in writing, saying the agencies responsible for security at the event have been “hamstrung” by the ongoing shutdown.

INF pullout. The US will begin pulling out of the Cold War-era INF nuclear treaty with Russia in February, after the failure of talks over a new Russian missile which is suspected of violating the agreement.

On the menu. Dale Berning Sawa takes a closer look at precisely what is allowed in the planetary health diet commissioned by The Norway-based thinktank Eat and the British medical journal the Lancet.

Jason Spindler, a businessman and 9/11 survivor, has been named as the American who died during a terror attack in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, on Tuesday, in which at least 20 people were killed.

Brazil’s new environment minister, Ricardo Salles, has suspended all partnerships with non-governmental organisations as part of what has been called a “war on NGOs” waged by the the country’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro.

An Isis suicide bomber has killed four Americans in north-eastern Syria, weeks after Trump announced he would pull US troops out of the country claiming the group had been defeated.

The first green shoot to sprout on the moon has become the first green shoot to sprout and then die on the moon, after temperatures on board China’s rover, Chang’e-4, plummeted during the lunar night.

Bitcoin mining uses as much power as a small country, according to some estimates. Miners compete for limited coins, resulting in an arms race, and that power usage increases constantly and rapidly.

Continue reading…

Donald Trump | The Guardian

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites)

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (41 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): Reuters: World News: Tunisia’s largest union stages nationwide strike over pay

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Rail, bus and air traffic stopped in Tunisia on Thursday as the powerful UGTT union staged a one-day nationwide strike to protest against the government’s refusal to raise the salaries of 670,000 public servants.

Reuters: World News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): Reuters: World News: Russia says sent BBC second demand for information about ownership: Ifax

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Russia’s state communications regulator said it has sent the BBC a second demand for documents about its ownership because the information the British public broadcaster provided was not “exhaustive”, Interfax news agency reported on Thursday.

Reuters: World News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): Reuters: World News: Top North Korean envoy boards flight to U.S.: Yonhap

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North Korea’s top envoy involved in denuclearisation talks with the United States boarded a flight in Beijing to Washington on Thursday, Yonhap news agency said.

Reuters: World News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Ex-NFLer Richie Incognito went into hiding after online ‘threat’ by teammate he allegedly bullied, report says

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A judge ruled Wednesday that former NFL player Jonathan Martin must stand trial on charges of criminal threats over an Instagram photo he posted last year of a shotgun with references to a high school he attended in Los Angeles and a former teammate accused of bullying him.

FOX News

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