1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: Malaysia’s Greatest Crisis: Loss Of National Pride And Unity – Analysis

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Love him or hate him, Mahathir Mohamed during his first stint as prime minister was able to instill a great sense of national pride and unity.

Mahathir went on a massive infrastructure drive. Most Malaysians were proud of the Penang Bridge that finally linked the island with the mainland. The North-South Highway project changed the nature of commuting up and down the peninsula. Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) was built and the development of Putra Jaya gave the country a new seat of administration.

Mahathir’s fait accompli was the building of the KLCC towers in central Kuala Lumpur, which were the tallest in the world at the time. These buildings are now the country’s major icon. Langkawi became a must holiday place for Malaysians. He brought elite Formula One motor racing and built a special purpose circuit for the event. He promoted the Tour de Langkawi as a local version of the Tour de France. He spared no expense on building massive new sporting complexes at Bukit Jalil to host the Commonwealth Games in 1998.

When the member nations of ASEAN abandoned the idea to build a regional car, Mahathir went alone, picking up old technology from Mitsubishi, creating the Proton Saga for better or worse although the national car project has been roundly criticized for losing hundreds of millions of dollars and costing more in terms of consumer lost opportunity.  

Nonetheless, Malaysia became an Asian Tiger and Mahathir himself became an outspoken leader internationally. The country was proud of what it had achieved.  He knew the value of national symbols. The slogan Malaysia Boleh (Malaysia Can) was often heard along with the waving of the Jalur Gemilang (stripes of glory – Malaysian Flag) at public displays of national pride and unity.

The Barisan Nasional was a working government coalition that symbolized national unity through the make-up of the cabinet and its true multi-ethnic flavor. Ministers like Samy Vellu from the Malaysian India Congress and Ling Liong Sik from the Malaysian Chinese Association had high public profiles.

Although Mahathir was labeled as an ultra-conservative Malay, he worked with anyone who could help him fulfil his vision. Businessmen like Vincent Tan, Robert Kuok, Lim Goh Tong, Ananda Krishnan, and Tony Fernandez all had very close relationships with Mahathir. Malaysia Inc. was more important to Mahathir than Malay supremacy.

That’s now 30 years ago. The prime casualty has been national pride and unity. The generally positive perception of the Mahathir era drastically changed when he abruptly sacked his deputy Anwar Ibrahim from office in 1998. The accusations and conviction of Anwar for sodomy polarized the population. The goodwill that Mahathir had built up over more than 25 years in public life was put into question.

Although it was his intention to eliminate his nemesis Anwar from politics, he made sodomy a household word in a conservative society, taking luster away from his legacy.  He was painted by the Anwar propaganda machine and the alternative media as a tyrant with millions of dollars hidden away in foreign banks. In addition, two years of headlines and court reports about Anwar’s sodomy trial took away a sense of innocence, showing Malaysia’s ‘dark side’ with TV pictures showing a stained mattress being carted into and out of court every day on which Anwar was convicted of performing sodomy.

Under weak successors, belief in government further faltered. Respect for national leaders took another hit with Mahathir’s successor Ahmad Badawi painted as someone who slept on the job and enjoyed a luxurious lifestyle while many suffered economically. Badawi was painted by the PKR propaganda machine as corrupt. The dealings of his son-in-law and political adviser Khairy Jamaluddin were portrayed as corrupt nepotism.

Mahathir engineered an ungraceful exit for Badawi, replacing him with Najib Razak in 2009. The Najib premiership was tainted from the outset with rumors of murder and corruption. Najib’s wife Rosmah also became an object of ridicule, bringing respect for the institution of government to an all-time low.

However, it’s not just the corruption of politicians that destroyed respect for Malaysian institutions. The rakyat (people) have always wanted to believe in royalty. Even with stories about royal misdoings, there is no real talk of abolishing the monarchy. Whenever a member of one of the royal families acts in the interests of the rakyat, there has always been public praise and support. However, when members of a royal family act against the interests of the rakyat, the social media react.

Stories have been circulating for years about the misdeeds of Johor Royal Family. The current spat between Tunku Ismail, the Johor Crown Prince, commonly known as TMJ and Mahathir is extremely damaging for the royal institutions. Only the sedition act, a de facto lese-majeste law, is protecting the institution from much wider criticism.

Royal decorations and titles, VVIP service in government offices and special treatment for some citizens over others, shows a muddled Malaysia still clinging to the vestiges of feudalism. These artefacts are doing nothing to unite the country, a hangover from the old days of colonial class distinction.

However, the most powerful source of destruction for national pride and unity is the ketuanan Melayu (Malay Superiority) narrative which has become much more extreme. One of the basic assumptions is that bumiputeras — indigenous peoples – are the rightful owners of the land. From the point of view of the ketuanan proponents, land is not seen as a national symbol and non-Malays are excluded. This is a great barrier to developing any sense of national pride and unity.

The gulf between Malay and non-Malay has widened dramatically over the last two generations as Islam has grown into a major aspect of Malay identity. Citizens once celebrated their diverse ethnicities in harmony. Decrees made in the name of Islam now discourage this. No longer are Hari Raya, Chinese New Year, Deepavali and Christmas shared Malaysian experiences.

The way of life has become Islamized to the point where there is little place for other religions and traditions. Food, dress codes, entertainment, education, the civil service, government, police and the military are all Islamized.

Shared apprehensions about what Malaysia will be have caused the Chinese to close ranks. The influence of Ketuanan Melayu in government policy excludes non-Malay participation in many fields like education, civil service and the military, etc. The younger generation of Chinese today tend to see themselves as Chinese first and Malaysians second. Chinese schools promote language and a strong sense of Chinese culture over a Malaysian identity as a mass defence mechanism.

The New Economic Policy, put in place in 1969 after disastrous race riots as an affirmative action program for the majority Malays, has also done a disservice to those it was designed to help. The thesis of Mahathir’s book The Malay Dilemma was that Malays were basically lazy and needed help from the government is the faulty grounding assumption. The NEP is actually an attack on Malay self-esteem.

Rather than offering something spiritual, Islam has become a doctrine of conformity, where particular rights and rituals must legally be adhered to. Failure to do so in the case of not fasting during Ramadan can lead to punitive legal action.  Any views outside narrow social norms lead to heavy criticism. Just recently the Islamic authorities (JAKIM) in Selangor started investigating a discussion forum on women’s choice about wearing the hijab. Not just freedom of discussion is stifled, but also the right to be creative.  

Islam has buried the principles of Rukun Negara (national principles), the supposed guiding philosophy of the nation. Rukun Negara was once a symbol of national pride and unity but has almost totally been replaced by a Doa (or prayer) before public events. A sense of nation has been sacrificed for the Islamization of public gatherings.

Today we see much less flag-waving during the Merdeka season. There are more divisional narratives on all ethnic sides. There is disappointment with the political system. Islam is seen by many as something overpowering rather than emancipating. People feel they need to conform to be accepted in society.

National pride and unity are at their lowest ebb since independence, where after 30 years of education the younger generations of Malays see Islam as more important than nationalism. Chinese and Indians are apprehensive about what Malaysia is turning into. Even the Orang Asli – the original inhabitants of the peninsula before the arrival of ethnic Malays from Indonesia — and non-Muslim indigenous people of Sabah and Sarawak identify as second-class.

Malaysia has travelled far away from the aspirations of Tunku Abdul Rahman when the Jalur Gemilang was raised for the first time over a free Malaya in 1957. Malaysia’s economic prosperity is relatively declining in the region and the nation is increasingly strangled by the need to conform. Malaysia appears to be a ship without a rudder, its reform agenda locked away under the Official Secrets Act.

The possibility of racial violence festering once again cannot be overlooked. Divisive narratives are being pushed until one day an unknown tipping point could be reached. The strong sense of social conformity, the exclusion of a national sense of ownership to all, the current totalitarian nature of authority and ketuanan Melayu narratives are a very dangerous mix.

Originally published in the Asia Sentinel

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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: The Iran Question – OpEd

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By Dr. Arshad M. Khan*

Will there
be war with Iran?  Will there not be war
with Iran?  The questions are being asked
repeatedly in the media even though a single carrier task force is steaming up
there.  The expression is old for the
latest carriers are nuclear powered. 
Imagine the mess if it was blown up.

There are
two kinds of weapons in the world … offensive and defensive.  The latter are cheaper, a fighter plane
compared to a bomber.  If a country does
not (or cannot afford to) have offensive intent, it makes sense to focus on
defense.  It is what Iran has done.  Moreover, its missile centered defense has a
modern deadly twist — the missiles are precision-guided. 

As an
Iranian general remarked when questioned about the carrier task force:  some years ago it would’ve been a threat he
opined; now it’s a target.  Iran also has
a large standing army of 350,000 plus a 120,000 strong Revolutionary Guard and
Soviet style air defenses.  In 2016
Russia started installation of the S-300 system.  It has all kinds of variants, the most
advanced, the S-300 PMU-3 has a range similar to the S-400 if equipped with
40N6E missiles, which are used also in the S-400.  Their range is 400 km, so the Iranian
batteries are virtually S-400s.  The wily
Putin has kept trump satisfied with the S-300 moniker without short-changing
his and China’s strategic ally.  The
latter continuing to buy Iranian oil.

Iran has
friends in Europe also.  Angela Merkel in
particular has pointed out that Iran has complied fully with the nuclear
provisions of the UN Security Council backed Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action
i.e. the Iran nuclear deal.  She is
mustering the major European powers. 
Already alienated with Trump treating them as adversaries rather than
friends, they find Trump’s bullying tiresome. 
President Macron, his poll ratings hitting the lowest, is hardly likely
to engage in Trump’s venture.  In
Britain, Theresa May is barely able to hold on to her job.  In the latest thrust by senior members of her
party, she has been asked to name the day she steps down.

So there we
have it.  Nobody wants war with
Iran.  Even Israel, so far without a
post-election government does not want to be rained upon by missiles leaky as
its Iron Dome was against homemade Palestinian rockets.

Topping all
of this neither Trump nor Secretary of State Pompeo want war.  Trump is as usual trying to bully — now
called maximum pressure — Iran into submission.  It won’t. 
The wild card is National Security Adviser John Bolton.  He wants war. 
A Gulf of Tonkin type false flag incident, or an Iranian misstep, or
some accident can still set it off. 

In Iran itself, moderates like current President Hassan Rouhani are being weakened by Trump’s shenanigans.  The hard liners might well want to bleed America as happened in Iraq and Afghanistan.

*About the author: Dr. Arshad M. Khan is a former Professor based in the US. Educated at King’s College London, OSU and The University of Chicago, he has a multidisciplinary background that has frequently informed his research. Thus he headed the analysis of an innovation survey of Norway, and his work on SMEs published in major journals has been widely cited. He has for several decades also written for the press: These articles and occasional comments have appeared in print media such as The Dallas Morning News, Dawn (Pakistan), The Fort Worth Star Telegram, The Monitor, The Wall Street Journal and others. On the internet, he has written for Antiwar.com, Asia Times, Common Dreams, Counterpunch, Countercurrents, Dissident Voice, Eurasia Review and Modern Diplomacy among many. His work has been quoted in the U.S. Congress and published in its Congressional Record.

Source: This article was published by Modern Diplomacy

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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: Nuclear Non-Proliferation Review Conference Could Hit A US Roadblock – Analysis

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By Shanta Roy

The Trump Administration, which has been recklessly wielding a wrecking ball against multilateral treaties, will be put to a test next year when the 1970 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) will be up for review at the 2020 conference scheduled to take place in New York in April-May.

“We
have a lot of work to do, especially since next year is the 50th
anniversary of the NPT,” Malaysian Ambassador Syed Mohamad Hasrin Aidid,
who chaired the preparatory committee (PrepCoM) sessions, which
concluded May 10, told the mayors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the
sidelines of the  PrepCom.

The
Trump administration’s hardline position against multilateral treaties
has been reflected in the U.S. withdrawal from three arms agreements so
far:  the 2015 multilateral nuclear agreement with Iran, the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty with Russia and the most recent un-signing of the 2013 international Arms Trade Treaty (ATT).

The
NPT Review Conference is held every five years since the treaty went
into force in 1970. According to the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA), the 2005 and 2015 Review Conferences were unable to reach agreement on any substantive outcome documents.

Dr Rebecca Johnson, founder of the Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy
and author of “Unfinished Business”, told IDN “while the PrepCom went
better than expected, the real questions for 2020 are not about the
review conference procedures but about the treaties under threat, mainly
from the short-sightedeness of Trump and his officials who prioritise
narrow nationalistic wish lists above collective international security,
and who prefer unilateral threats to international legal agreements.”

In
the run-up to 2020, she argued, “we need to bring into force the new UN
Treaty that prohibits nuclear weapons use, production and deployment
for everyone, and strengthen all aspects of the international security
regimes that we need to protect humanity from nuclear and climate
catastrophes that are looming over us.”

Dr
Johnson also pointed out that the recently-concluded NPT PrepCom was
better than many had feared, thanks to the calm and effective chairing
of Malaysia’s Ambassador Hasrin.

“He
managed to bypass various problems to adopt the main procedural issues,
including agreement to designate Argentina’s Ambassador Rafael Grossi
as president of next year’s 2020 Review Conference.” 

She
added that it had surprised no-one that the PrepCom ended without
getting consensus agreement on issue-based recommendation – “in light of
the deep divisions caused by the U.S. and Russia suspending the INF
Treaty, the U.S. trying to wreck the JCPOA that was meant to constrain Iran’s nuclear programme, as well as Syria, North Korea and other real world problems”

“A lot can happen in a year, negative and positive,” declared Dr Johnson, who also serves on the International Panel on Fissile Materials (IPFM) and International Steering Group (ISG) of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), following several years as ICAN Co-Chair and first President of ICAN Europe-Middle-East-Africa (EMEA).

“We
have to use this year to put human security above narrow nationalist
interests and reinforce local and global action to prevent the twin
humanitarian disasters of climate destruction and nuclear war.”

The
current U.S. aggressive stance is attributed to two senior hawkish
America officials: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and National Security
Adviser John Bolton, who are also pushing for U.S. military action on
Iran.

Dr Tarja Cronberg, Distinquished Associate Fellow, at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), told IDN the NPT is a treaty designed by the U.S. (and the Soviet Union) in the 1960´s.

Although
the treaty requires nuclear disarmament, it gives the right to five
states to maintain nuclear weapons at the same time, as it prevents
other states from accessing these weapons, she said.

As
both the right to have nuclear weapons – and to prevent proliferation –
are in the fundamental interest of the U.S., it is hard to imagine that
the Trump administration would use “the wrecking ball” at the 2020 NPT
Review Conference.

On
the contrary, it is in the U.S. interests that the conference ends with
a consensus document supporting the NPT, said Dr Cronberg.

Furthermore,
opposed to other treaties the U.S. is withdrawing from, such as the
Arms Trade Treaty and the INF-treaty – both of which limit U.S. freedom
of action – the NPT treaty empowers the U.S., both to keep its own arms
and at the same time provides a platform to the U.S. to prevent others,
especially Iran and North Korea from possessing nuclear weapons, she
argued.

“In
this very case the U.S. would be expected to, not to oppose the
multilateral character of the NPT-treaty, but to support it.”

“The
situation is, however, challenged by the JCPOA, a multilateral
agreement preventing Iran from manufacturing nuclear weapons. If this
agreement, supported by the remaining partners after the U.S. exit in
2018, collapses before the 2020 conference, this will undermine the
NPT,” she added.

Furthermore,
if as a result, Iran would leave the NPT (today not a likely
alternative) this could challenge the very existence of the NPT. In this
case the U.S. would indirectly be responsible for wrecking the NPT, she
noted.

Dr
Cronberg also said the 2019 Prep Com that just finished in New York
brought the long-term frustration built into the NPT between those who
want the disarmament pillar strengthened and those that see the NPT only
as a non-proliferation treaty into the open.

“Empowered
by the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, the majority
of the non-nuclear weapon states had a major influence on the chair’s
recommendations for the 2020 conference. Opposed by the nuclear weapon
states, particularly the U.S. and its allies, this confirms the
polarisation of the current nuclear order.” 

Unless
the nuclear weapon states succeed in agreeing on disarmament measures
that could form a basis for a compromise at the NPT 2020, the conference
will be as divided as the Prep Com, she predicted.

Nevertheless,
as the Review Conference is the 50th birthday of the NPT, there will be
strong pressure to achieve a final consensus document, however thin,
praising the treaty for its achievements, Dr Cronberg declared.

Meanwhile,
at a press briefing in Sochi, Russia on May 14, and in the presence of
Pompeo, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said: “I hope that we’ll
be able to come up with specifics of ways how to get U.S.-Russian
relations out of that regrettable state that they happen to be, due to
several objective and subjective reasons involved, considering that this
is the task, the instructions coming from our presidents that was
confirmed during the Helsinki summit, as well as in their conversation
on the 3rd of May.”

He
said both the US and Russia have multiple issues that require both
urgent methods as well as long-term, sustainable solutions.

“That
has to do with the situation in strategic stability sphere, as well as
more efficient ways to tackle terrorism, as well as finding solutions to
different clashes in different regions of the world.”

He
added: “We see that there are certain suspicions and prejudice on both
sides, but this is not a way for – have a win-win situation because that
mistrust that we have hinders both your security and our security, and
causes concern around the world.”

“I
believe that it is time to build new, more constructive and responsible
metrics of our relationship, of our mutual perception, and we are
prepared to do that if our U.S. colleagues and counterparts readily
support that.”

“I
believe that a requisite – an important requisite for success of our
dialogue is to rebuild trust at all levels of our dialogue – in the
highest level, at the working level, (inaudible). And considering that
we have met over the past two weeks for two times, that’s a reason for
some optimism.”

“Let’s try it and see what happens,” declared Lavrov.

According
to the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs, the NPT is a landmark
international treaty whose objective is to prevent the spread of nuclear
weapons and weapons technology, to promote cooperation in the peaceful
uses of nuclear energy and to further the goal of achieving nuclear
disarmament and general and complete disarmament.

The
Treaty represents the only binding commitment in a multilateral treaty
to the goal of disarmament by the nuclear-weapon States. Opened for
signature in 1968, the Treaty entered into force in 1970.

On
May 11, 1995, the Treaty was extended indefinitely. A total of 191
States have joined the Treaty, including the five nuclear-weapon States.
More countries have ratified the NPT than any other arms limitation and
disarmament agreement, a testament to the Treaty’s significance.

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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: Convicted Russian Agent Butina Makes Video Appeal For Money

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(RFE/RL) — Maria Butina, the Russian gun-rights activist convicted in the United States for acting as an unregistered foreign agent, has issued a video appeal for financial contributions to help pay her legal bills.

Butina, who is serving an 18-month sentence in an Oklahoma prison, is
seen on a phone with bunk beds behind her pleading for people to donate
money so she can pay her attorney’s fees.

Butina, 30, was sentenced in April after admitting to gathering
intelligence on the National Rifle Association and other U.S. groups
under the direction of a former Russian lawmaker.

She said in the May 19 video that her lawyer was filing an appeal against her sentence.

Butina’s father, Valery Butin, had earlier said that the family no
longer had any money for legal fees and that his daughter’s lawyers were
working for free.

Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said on May 19
that although the Russian government did not “finance attorneys,” the
ministry would “do our best to see to it that she will be afforded all
rights as a Russian citizen.”

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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: Family Structures In North Caucasus Modernizing But Conservatism Is Intensifying – OpEd

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A massive, four-year-long study of families in the North Caucasus shows that they are modernizing rapidly in many respects with the authority of elders and clans falling and gender roles changing. But at the same time, under the impact of Islamization, conservatism on these questions, especially among men, is intensifying

Irina Starodubrovskaya of the Gaidar Institute reports her findings in current issue of Moscow’s Russian-language Journal of Social Policy Studies (jsps.hse.ru/article/view/8855), a detailed article that has now been summarized by IQ journalist Olga Sobolevskaya  at iq.hse.ru/news/273231587.html.

The basic features of the traditional family, including generational and gender hierarchies, are falling apart, the Moscow scholar says. The clan is declining in importance; but “at the same time,” gender differences remain and young people affected by the spread of fundamentalist Islam often have more traditional views than their elders.

In traditional societies there, “the family and the clan serve as the model of society as a whole,” with strict age and gender hierarchies, the unity of the personality and the community, the submersion of the individual in the collective and the regulation of behavior with the assistance of fear and shame.”

That model which was undermined by the Soviet system has broken down since 1991 for five major reasons, Starodubrovskaya says. These include migration which takes people out of their traditional milieu, market relations which change the basis of authority, urbanization, globalization and its models of alternative behaviors, and fundamentalist Islam.

The last element works in a contradictory way, she says. On the one hand, because most of the adherents of fundamentalist Islam are young men, they reject the authority of fathers and father figures. But on the other, they insist on family relations and especially gender roles that are more conservative than those their parents have accepted.

Within the region and even within families, these various values are often in open competition and conflict, the scholar says the survey shows. As one respondent from Karachayevo-Cherkessia put it, “in one house there may be entirely European rules for somethings, and Asiatic ones for others.

But the overall trend is clear: the clan is ceasing to be the structuring element of the community, the older generation is losing control over the young, the nuclear family is becoming predominant, but children continue to be held responsible for taking care of their elderly relatives.

Nonetheless, the speed of change varies among the republics. In Chechnya and “especially in Ingushetia where there are no major cities and where the clans live together in compact settlements, traditional relations are stable … in Daghestan, the situation is more complicated,” with an intermixture of values and behaviors.

Marriage practices are among the most sensitive indicators of these changes.  Parents no longer organize most marriages, but in some places, the kind of Islam the potential partners profess is more important than the attitudes of relatives or members of the community even though many new couples are forced to live with their families.

One interesting detail which shows the way in which change and tradition are accommodating one another: Ever more parents are willing to allow their daughters to marry earlier not so much because they think this is a good idea but because otherwise, given the spread of sexual freedom, their daughters won’t be virgins when they do.

’s most important finding, however, may be this. Her research found that there has been a shift back to very conservative values, “above all” among young men. Young women continue to seek emancipation but young men who affect fundamentalist Islam want to restore family practices that even their parents think are outmoded.

As a result, the scholar says, the North Caucasus is likely to be riven by more conflicts in  the future, although they may be fundamentally different than those which have divided it up to now.

Indeed, in reading this study, the author of these lines was reminded of the ways in which the Soviets sought to use young women to break down traditional societies in the Central Asian republics in the 1920s, a strategy brilliantly described by Gregory Massell in his 1974 classic The Surrogate Proletariat (Princeton University Press).

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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: Archbishop Of Erbil: Is The US Abandoning Christians At Risk In Iraq?

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Archbishop Bashar Warda, one of the leading voices on behalf of
persecuted and displaced Christians in Iraq, released today an urgent
statement regarding the retreat of U.S. personnel from key areas in the
country.

“We are gravely concerned regarding the recent draw down of the U.S.
presence in Iraq,” the archbishop said. “Having faced genocide at the
hands of ISIS, our shattered communities have drawn immense hope from
the promise of the American commitment to Iraqi minority communities
spearheaded by the Vice President.”

Warda, as Archbishop of Erbil in the Kurdistan region, received tens
of thousands of Christian and Yazidi refugees displaced from the Nineveh
Plain after ISIS took large swaths of territory in Iraq and Syria and
declared a caliphate in 2012.

“The 2011 pullout by the last administration created the vacuum which
allowed ISIS to emerge,” the archbishop said. “A new vacuum created by
American disengagement will likely meet with a similarly unhappy result.
We urgently await clarification from the U.S. government concerning its
commitments to the endangered minorities of Iraq.”

On Wednesday, the U.S. State Department ordered the evacuation of all
non-emergency U.S. government employees at the American embassy in
Baghdad and consulate in Erbil. The Trump administration said the order
was given in relation to a threat connected to Iran. Iraqi authorities
have expressed doubt about the threat. U.S. lawmakers have asked
President Donald Trump for more information about the situation.

Stephen Rasche, counsel for the Chaldean Catholic Archdiocese of
Erbil, told CNA that Archbishop Warda is responding to this partial
evacuation.

“We are responding particularly today to unclear information over the
past several days from various sources within the U.S. government that
the U.S. is preparing to pull back, at least in part, from its prior
commitments regarding support to endangered minorities in Iraq,” Rasche
said.

Rasche said that Christians and other minorities are increasingly
nervous because “the Church in Iraq has yet to receive a clear statement
from anyone in the U.S. Government as to what the drawdown of personnel
means for efforts to help these minorities.”

On October 25, 2017, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence committed to defending persecuted Christians in the Middle East.

He told a crowd gathered in Washington D.C. for the annual summit of
In Defense of Christians (IDC) that the US “will no longer rely on the
United Nations alone to assist persecuted Christians and minorities in
the wake of genocide and the atrocities of terrorist groups.”

“The United States will work hand in hand from this day forward with
faith-based groups and private organizations to help those who are
persecuted for their faith. This is the moment, now is the time, and
America will support these people in their hour of need,” Pence also
said.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Stars and Stripes: Temple memorial to Florida shooting victims is set ablaze

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A wooden temple built as a memorial to the 17 victims of a Florida high school mass shooting was set ablaze Sunday in a symbolic gesture of healing. The “Temple of Time” public art installation was set afire at a ceremony hosted by the cities of Parkland and Coral Springs, where Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students live.

Stars and Stripes

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites)


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News and Times from Michael_Novakhov (15 sites): The News and Times of Puerto Rico: Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites): mikenov on Twitter: Buttigieg calls Trump’s presidency a ‘hostile takeover’ youtu.be/fniNSspFetY via @YouTube

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Buttigieg calls Trump’s presidency a ‘hostile takeover’ youtu.be/fniNSspFetY via @YouTube


Posted by

mikenov
on Monday, May 20th, 2019 2:27am

mikenov on Twitter

Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites)

The News and Times of Puerto Rico

News and Times from Michael_Novakhov (15 sites)


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News and Times from Michael_Novakhov (15 sites): The News and Times of Puerto Rico: Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites): mikenov on Twitter: youtube.com/watch?v=fniNSs… #FBIIssues: #CriminalJustice, #MiscarriagesOfJustice, #FalseConvictions: Investigate The Investigators! #InvestigateTheInvestigators fbireform.com fbinewsreview.org trumpinvestigations.org trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com #FBI #MayorPete #Trump

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youtube.com/watch?v=fniNSs…
#FBIIssues: #CriminalJustice, #MiscarriagesOfJustice, #FalseConvictions:
Investigate The Investigators!
#InvestigateTheInvestigators

fbireform.com
fbinewsreview.org
trumpinvestigations.org
trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com
#FBI #MayorPete #Trump


Posted by

mikenov
on Monday, May 20th, 2019 2:27am

mikenov on Twitter

Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites)

The News and Times of Puerto Rico

News and Times from Michael_Novakhov (15 sites)


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