1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: US Prisons Are Concentration Camps – OpEd

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

There were already thousands of concentration camps in the United
States before Donald Trump began his reign of terror over asylum
seekers. They are called prisons.

Most Americans are loathe to condemn their own country. Even when
they do they refuse to acknowledge its vast history of criminality and
prefer to behave as if the latest outrage is an outlier event.

The disgraceful treatment meted out to asylum seekers at the southern
border must be condemned unequivocally. Congresswoman Alexandria
Ocasio-Cortez and other House members performed their due diligence when
they witnessed the horrible conditions first hand.

But Ocasio-Cortez is also the source of confusion on the subject. Her
assessment that these facilities can be called concentration camps
created consternation and debate. That reaction isn’t surprising
considering that Americans are in a permanent state of denial about
their nation. Those very loaded words are commonly associated with Nazi
Germany, the country we are told was the ultimate embodiment of evil. It
is difficult for most people to connect the country they think of as
being good and virtuous with Hitler’s atrocities.

The discussion should not revolve around the question of whether or
not the term concentration camp applies in this situation. There is a
larger problem in assuming that an entirely new condition has suddenly
been established when that is not the case.

There were already thousands of concentration camps in the United
States before Donald Trump began his reign of terror over asylum
seekers. These concentration camps are usually referred to as prisons.

More than two million people are locked up for serious crimes but
more often for more minor cases that should be adjudicated otherwise.
There are people serving life sentences for non-violent offenses under
the notorious “three strikes” sentencing laws. A black woman in Alabama
was recently indicted after she was the victim of a shooting which
caused her to miscarry.

That kind of draconian sentencing and punishment for its own sake is
the hallmark of an authoritarian regime that is full of concentration
camps. Juveniles are tried as adults, pregnant women given birth in
shackles, and prisoners work for a pittance or are even charged for
their incarceration. Private corporations run prisons and turn a profit.
Other companies make money by selling products made by prisoners. Call
centers are staffed by inmates and everything from clothing to furniture
ought to be labeled Made in Prison.

There is nothing new going on at the border. All of the horrors meted
out to Hondurans fleeing the government imposed upon them by the United
States are already experienced by the two million people living behind
bars. 

The term concentration camp could have been used long before in
describing the world’s worst prison state. Unfortunately even liberals
succumb to the urge to defend their country. The use of nonsensical
expressions such as, “This is not who we are,” are created by wishful
thinking and are an effort to disappear a very ugly history.

The country that began with the attempt to exterminate the indigenous
population and continued with the enslavement of millions of people was
obviously the site of many concentration camps.
Native Americans were held in them before being sent far from their
homes. Slave markets and plantations were concentration camps as were
the chain gangs which followed. The internment of Japanes Americans fits
the same description.

That sordid history culminates in the mass incarceration state which
disproportionately impacts black people. The group represented by a mere
13% of the total population comprises half of those caught behind bars.
It is important to speak truthfully about this country, even if tender
sensibilities are hurt in the process.

The days of pretending that evil deeds are anomalous must end. The
rampant injustices in this country must be called out and there is no
better place to start than with the prison state. It is commendable that
workers at the Wayfair corporation protested the sale of furniture to
detention centers. Yet there is no similar action directed towards the
rest of the prison industrial complex.

Anti-black racism is so firmly entrenched in the system and in the
national psyche that it continues to be unaddressed even by those who
claim non-racist credentials. Every other group in need of redress may
become the topic of national discourse while the elephant in the room is
unnoticed. 

If concerned people want to call the migrant detention centers
concentration camps they should do so. They shouldn’t forget that this
institution is not a new one. It is as they saying goes, as American as
apple pie.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Trump digital operations from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites): “Trump digital operations” – Google News: Digital Jail: How Ankle Monitors Drive Defendants Into Debt – The National Memo

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Digital Jail: How Ankle Monitors Drive Defendants Into Debt  The National Memo

States and cities, which incur most of the cost of prisons, are increasingly passing the financial burden of ankle monitors onto those who wear them.

“Trump digital operations” – Google News

Trump digital operations from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (96 sites): Trump digital operations from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites): “Trump digital operations” – Google News: Digital Jail: How Ankle Monitors Drive Defendants Into Debt – The National Memo

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Digital Jail: How Ankle Monitors Drive Defendants Into Debt  The National Memo

States and cities, which incur most of the cost of prisons, are increasingly passing the financial burden of ankle monitors onto those who wear them.

“Trump digital operations” – Google News

Trump digital operations from Michael_Novakhov (3 sites)

Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (96 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): Eurasia Review: The Pitfalls Of Private Sector Investment In Infrastructure Financing – Analysis

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

By Cyril Prinsloo*

The virtues of private sector financing in infrastructure development
are widely promoted: it supports countries in bridging their
infrastructure financing deficit, helps countries diversify their
financing portfolio, brings projects online quicker, and often respects
countries’ sovereignty by not imposing conditionalities. Yet much
research glosses over the shortcomings of private capital investment in
infrastructure: the interest rate exceeds that of all other creditors
with shorter maturities; and private financiers often lack a development
mandate, are more selective of the projects they finance and are more
risk averse. These factors, coupled with weak institutional structures
and a volatile macroeconomic environment in many African countries, make
private finance less attractive. This briefing highlights some of the
challenges encountered when engaging private capital for infrastructure
development. It offers recommendations to policymakers on how to avoid
these pitfalls and enhance African agency in infrastructure development.

Introduction

Infrastructure development, as a driver of economic growth, remains
central to the development agenda of every African country. Yet a
significant infrastructure financing deficit – estimated at between $68
billion and $108 billion annually [1] – is holding back infrastructure
development on the continent. To bridge this deficit, copious dialogues
and policymaking efforts are aimed at attracting private financiers –
corporates, infrastructure funds, pension funds and sovereign wealth
funds, among others – to infrastructure investment.

The virtues of private sector financing in infrastructure development
are widely promoted: it supports countries in bridging their
infrastructure financing deficit, helps countries diversify their
financing portfolio, brings projects online quicker, and often respects
countries’ sovereignty by not imposing conditionalities.[2] Yet most
research and dialogue gloss over the shortcomings of private sector
financing of infrastructure: the interest rate exceeds that of all other
creditors while maturities are shorter; and private financiers often
lack a development mandate, are more selective of the projects they
finance and are more risk averse. African policymakers engaging in
infrastructure financing should consider these characteristics which,
coupled with often-weak domestic institutions and volatile macroeconomic
environments, make the offering less attractive.

This briefing draws on a series of studies that the South African
Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) undertook through the Global Economic Governance Africa
programme.[3] It highlights some of the challenges that these studies
identified in respect of sector financing. It also offers lessons for
policymakers on how to avoid the pitfalls and enhance African agency in
infrastructure development.

Infrastructure financing in African countries: a changing milieu

The infrastructure financing milieu in Africa has changed drastically over the past two decades. Public financing traditionally accounted for the bulk of infrastructure expenditure, supplemented primarily by loans from multilateral development banks (MDBs). However, the addition of alternative sources of finance – new and non-Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) bilateral lenders, bonds raised on domestic and international markets, and private financiers – has altered this traditional make-up. Concessional financing has declined, with market-based loans increasing from 54% in 2005 to 66% in 2016.4 In 2017 financing from African governments, MDBs and OECD countries constituted 66.1% of total financing; China alone accounted for 23.8% and contributions from private sources came to 2.8% (see Figure 1).

Global (eg, G20 and the Global Infrastructure Hub)
and continental (AU) dialogues [5] have consistently embraced the
concept of leveraging private financing in infrastructure development.
The size of this potentially untapped source is illustrative in South
Africa: pension assets, one source of private capital, equate to 87% of
South Africa’s gross domestic product (roughly $350 billion in 2018).[6]
Much of this dialogue among multilateral and regional institutions
reflects on bridging the technical challenges hindering greater private
financial involvement. Of these the main challenges are: a lack of
financial instruments, a lack of expertise among private investors to
engage in infrastructure projects, a preference for traditional asset
classes, a limited number of bankable projects in which to invest and
strict regulatory thresholds for institutional investors.[7]

Characteristics of private sector financing

The drawbacks of private investment in infrastructure are typically
neglected. The following section details some of the main drawbacks:
higher cost, prioritisation of profit over development, selectivity and
risk-averseness.

Cost considerations

Private sector financing is considerably more expensive than all
other sources of finance, with less favourable terms attached. Interest
rates on private sector loans typically range from 15–25% with
maturities ranging between seven and nine years. In contrast, the
interest on bilateral loans typically ranges from 2–5%; non-concessional
loans from MDBs typically attract 2.5% interest and concessional loans
1–2%, with maturities ranging from 25–40 years.[8] Higher financing
costs are concerning for a continent confronted with rising debt. While
overall debt levels on the continent remain manageable, the steadily
upward trend at increased costs is worrying (see Figure 2).

The negative impact of excessive debt cannot be overstated: Adeniran et al. cite the negative ‘social impact of debt build-ups on sustainable development, the widening infrastructure deficit despite the rising debt commitment, dampened growth prospects and the high incidence of poverty’ [9] as key inhibiting factors impeding development. In addition, the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative that sought debt relief for the continent throughout the 2000s highlighted private financiers’ reluctance to restructure debt.

Prioritisation of profits over development

Unlike public sector or MDB lenders, private financiers often favour
profit considerations over development impact. Private financiers also
typically pay scant attention to mechanisms designed to enhance
sustainable development outcomes of infrastructure, such as job
creation, local content procurement, enterprise development,
socio-economic development or the mainstreaming of gender considerations
into infrastructure projects. While socially responsible investment is
increasing among private financiers (eg, ringfencing investment in
sustainable infrastructure programmes such as green bonds), this
practice remains nascent.

South Africa’s Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme
(REI4P) highlights the reluctance of private investors to accommodate
economic development criteria. Through the REI4P, South Africa’s
national energy utility procures electricity from independent power
producers through a competitive bidding programme. Bids were evaluated
on a 70/30 split for price and economic development considerations,
rather than the 90/10 split typically employed for government
procurement. Private developers deemed these additional development
criteria too onerous. Yet, despite the government’s upping economic
development criteria over subsequent electricity procurement windows,
the average tariffs for wind and solar dropped considerably, [10]
highlighting the continued profitability of projects despite increased
development considerations.[11]

The private sector’s scant regard for development outcomes was also
observed in the failure to mainstream marginalised groups in
infrastructure development in Rwanda. For example, [12]

some private equity interviewees acknowledged that
attention to gender-based issues had been a result of top-down pressure
arising from the need to comply with the requirements of development
finance institutions and MDBs, with little meaningful engagement beyond
treating gender as a tick-box exercise.

Evidence from this case study also illustrated that despite strong
inclusive growth policies in Rwanda, inadequate monitoring and
implementation capacity allows private financiers to evade or circumvent
their obligations in this regard.[13] Private funds as an alternative
financing source should not be discounted because of the lack of a
development mandate. Factoring it into consideration when leveraging
private finance is vital. Where governments lack experience or technical
capacity to ensure private financing delivers on development
objectives, MDBs could be a suitable alternative. MDBs have decades’
worth of development knowledge and technical implementation capacity to
help countries achieve the greatest development impact.

Selectivity and risk aversion

Institutional investors often value ‘safety of assets over
development outcomes’.[14] This alludes to an additional shortcoming of
private financiers: the tendency to select least-risk infrastructure
sectors and stages of the infrastructure value chain.

Historically, private financing has been concentrated in the information and communications technology (ICT), renewable energy and transport sectors (see Figure 3). Interest in these sectors is driven by four factors: ‘firstly, the clear costs associated with such projects, secondly, the low risk exposure during development and construction, thirdly the easy securitisation of revenue streams and finally the private sector’s control over the management of the investment’.[15] It is important to differentiate between economic infrastructure (ICT, renewable energy, transport), which typically sees returns on investments, and social infrastructure (education and healthcare), which typically does not recover capital costs but has the biggest development impact. There is little appetite among private investors for social infrastructure projects.

Private financiers are also reluctant to engage in the early stages of infrastructure development (Figure 4). Project preparation costs range between 5% and 15% of total project costs and can take up to 10 years to complete. [16] This time and expense are sunk costs if projects do not come to fruition. It is not a dearth of financing options that hinders infrastructure development, but rather that there is ‘a broad consensus that bottlenecks in project development and preparation are now the most serious constraints [in African countries]’. [17] This highlights the need for more project preparation finance.

Private financiers also typically prefer brownfield investments to
greenfield projects. Brownfield investments have lower early stage
development and construction risks and provide immediate cash flows.[18]
Similarly, private financiers consider regional projects (irrespective
of sector or stage) too complex [19] and have little appetite to invest
in these projects. [20]

While these characteristics of private finance should not discourage
policymakers from engaging private sources of finance, factoring them
into infrastructure planning and engagement is vital. Public funds, for
example, should be leveraged in those sectors where there is no interest
from private financiers (eg, social infrastructure) or in stages of the
infrastructure development value chain that are unattractive to private
financing (eg, project preparation and capacity development). Piecemeal
use of private financing could be more cost effective.

Enhancing African agency in infrastructure development

These characteristics of private capital investors are compounded by
two underlying challenges pervasive in African countries that limit
their agency in infrastructure development: lack of capacity and reduced
public expenditure in infrastructure financing.

Capacity development

Inadequate technical, governance and implementation capacity in
African countries exposes them to exploitation (intentionally or
unintentionally) by private investors. Examples abound across the
infrastructure value chain: a lack of technical capacity results in
poorly written terms of reference, and insufficient technical capacity
hinders enforceability of standards in infrastructure projects,
resulting in poor quality infrastructure.[21] In Mozambique, weak debt
management capacity and poor transparency mechanisms contributed to debt
distress.[22] And in Lesotho, insufficient legal capacity had dramatic
negative consequences in negotiations for a public–private partnership,
locking Maseru into an unfavourable long-term contract.[23]

It is in the interest of policymakers to strengthen domestic
legislation, institutions and policies governing infrastructure
development and investment. Better capacity will lead to more
sustainable infrastructure: infrastructure development efficiency will
increase, limiting corruption and wasteful expenditure. Availability of
domestic skills and production will increase domestic procurement and
job creation to maximise the development impact of projects.[24]
Enhanced capacity will also increase African countries’ agency in
infrastructure development through better engagement with financiers and
enforcement of outsourced projects.

Most countries prefer grants for capacity building.[25] Yet, since
this is a long-term investment with development benefits akin to
physical infrastructure, lending for capacity-building activities should
also be prioritised. Capacity development should be viewed as a core
component of loans, rather than as an add-on to project lending.[26]

Infrastructure expenditure

Larger infrastructure contributions will allow African countries
greater autonomy in the administration and application of funds, curbing
fears of undue national interests dominating decision-making in
infrastructure development.27 However, infrastructure expenditure across
the continent is declining.28 In SADC, for example, capital expenditure
has dropped from 23.31% in 2008 to 22.19% in 2016, with countries such
as Botswana and Madagascar recording double-digit declines.[29]
Governments are increasing their spending on recurring budget
expenditure, typically providing social services and servicing debt
costs. For African countries to own the development financing process,
they need to increase their domestic contributions.

In the absence of increased expenditure, smarter and innovative
mechanisms can enhance African agency. As highlighted earlier, public
funds should focus on sectors and segments of infrastructure development
for which other financiers have little appetite. Outsourcing financing
where appetite exists would free up limited public resources. In other
cases, blending public and private monies can effectively bring down the
interest rate.[30] However, governments should guard against costly
financing options where possible and factor in macro-economic factors.

Smarter infrastructure expenditure should also include exploring new
forms of public– private financing mechanisms that address both cost and
development concerns. Future SAIIA research will focus on the role of
green bonds or sub-national pooled financing as two alternative
financing mechanisms.

Conclusion

Highlighting the nature of private capital in infrastructure investment is not an indictment of the role private investors could play in promoting sustainable development in African countries. However, it underscores the need for policymakers to consider the costs and benefits of different sources of financing and leverage them accordingly.

*About the author: Cyril Prinsloo’s research focuses on infrastructure financing and development in Africa, as well as Africa’s interaction with strategic global partners such as the US, EU, China and the BRICS bloc. Cyril Prinsloo is also a fellow of the Global Governance Futures – Robert Bosch Foundation Multilateral Dialogues programme.

Source: This article was published by SAIIA

Acknowledgement

This work draws on valuable research undertaken by SAIIA and external
associates over three years. They include Abdelaaziz Ait Ali, Adedeji
Adeniran, Asmita Parshotam, Badr Mandri, Chelsea Markowitz, Cyril
Prinsloo, El Mostafa Jamea, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, Ghazi Tayeb, Gideon
Oberholzer, Hanneke van der Westhuizen, Joel Barnor, Kedibonye Sekakela,
Kwame Owino, Lesley Wentworth, Luanda Mpungose, Malcolm Pautz, Mma
Amara Ekeruche, Neuma Grobbelaar, Olalekan Samuel Bodunrin, Talitha
Bertelsmann-Scott, Tulo Makwati and Zinhle Ngidi. Any errors remain the
sole responsibility of the author.

Footnotes:

[1] AfDB (African Development Bank), ‘African Economic Outlook 2018’, https://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Publications/2018AEO/African_Economic_Outlook_2018_-_EN_Chapter3.pdf, accessed 12 April 2019.
[2] Prinsloo C et al., ‘Informing the Approach of Multilateral
Development Banks to Use of Country Systems’, GEG AFrica (Global
Economic Governance Africa) Discussion Paper, September 2017, http://www.gegafrica.org/publications/discussion-paper-inform
ing-the-approach-of-multilateral-development-banks-to-use-of-country-systems, accessed 16 April 2019.
[3] The GEG Africa programme contributed to the international system of
global economic governance by ensuring African views and voices were
considered and by creating dialogue platforms on global economic
governance issues. The GEG Africa programme produced evidence-based
research on continental infrastructure priorities, provided input to the
South African government on how development finance institutions can
increase infrastructure spending in Africa, and contributed to
infrastructure financing mechanisms that support economic
sustainability. For more information, see GEG Africa, ‘Theme 1:
Development finance for infrastructure’, http://www.gegafrica.org/theme/theme-1, accessed 7 June 2019.
[4] Adeniran M et al., ‘Africa’s Rising Debt’, GEG Africa Discussion Paper, November 2018, http://www.gegafrica.org/item/884-discussion-paper-africa-s-rising-debt, accessed 16 April 2019.
[5] As well as other areas of focus, such as the Addis Ababa Action Agenda and the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa.
[6] Oberholzer G et al., ‘Infrastructure as an Asset Class in Africa’, GEG Africa Discussion Paper, November 2018, http://www.gegafrica.org/item/860-infrastructure-as-an-asset-class-in-africa, accessed 16 April 2019.
[7] Ibid.
[8] Adeniran M et al., op. cit. It should be noted that these numbers
are not absolute or representative, and should be used as a guide only –
particularly as loan interest rates and maturity periods depend on a
wide range of factors, including prevailing risks.
[9] Ibid.
[10] Between bidding windows 1 and 4, tariff prices for wind dropped
from ZAR 114 c/kWh to ZAR 72 c/kWh, while those for solar PV dropped
from ZAR 276 c/kWh to ZAR 85 c/kWh.
[11] Prinsloo C, ‘South Africa and BRICS: Enhancing Economic Cooperation in the Renewable Energy Sector’, forthcoming.
[12] Parshotam A & H van der Westhuizen, ‘Women and The Energy Value
Chain: Opportunities for a More Inclusive Renewable Energy Sector in
Africa’, GEG Africa Discussion Paper, October 2018, http://www.gegafrica.org/item/844-women-and-the-energy-

valuechain-opportunities-for-a-more-inclusive-renewable-energy-sector-in-africa, accessed 16 April 2019.
[13] Ibid.
[14] Oberholzer G et al., op. cit.
[15] Prinsloo C, ‘Partnering with the New Development Bank: What Improved Services Can It Offer Middle-income Countries?’, GEG
Africa Discussion Paper, November 2016, http://www.gegafrica.org/publications/partnering-with-the-new-development-bankwhat-improved-services-can-it-offer-middle-income-countries, accessed 16 April 2019.
[16] Wentworth L et al., ‘SADC Regional Development Fund Operationalisation Imminent?’, GEG Africa Discussion Paper, July 2018, http://www.gegafrica.org/item/718-sadc-regional-development-fund-operationalisation-imminent, accessed 16 April 2019.
[17] Oberholzer G et al., op. cit.
[18] Ibid.
[19] Such complexity stems from having to deal with various funding and
implementing agencies, different legislative and regulatory regimes, and
competing political interests, among others.
[20] Prinsloo C, op. cit.
[21] Wentworth L et al., op. cit.
[22] Adeniran M et al., op. cit.
[23] Bertelsmann-Scott T, Markowitz C & A Parshotam, ‘Mapping
Current Trends in Infrastructure Financing In Low-Income Countries in
Africa within the Context of the African Development Fund’, GEG Africa
Discussion Paper, November 2017, http://www.gegafrica.org/publications/mapping-current-trends-in-infrastructure-financing-in-low-income-countries-in-africa-within-the-context-of-theafrican-development-fund, accessed 16 April 2019.
[24] Prinsloo C et al., ‘Informing the Approach of Multilateral
Development Banks to Use of Country Systems’, GEG Africa Discussion
Paper, September 2018, http://www.gegafrica.org/publications/discussion-paper-informing-the-approach-of
multilateral- development-banks-to-use-of-country-systems
, accessed 16 April 2019.
[25] Bertelsmann-Scott T, Markowitz C & A Parshotam, op. cit.
[26] Wentworth L et al., op. cit.
[27] Ibid.
[28] Adeniran M et al., op. cit.
[29] Wentworth L et al., op. cit.
[30] Bertelsmann-Scott T, Markowitz C & A Parshotam, op. cit.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites): “International Security” – Google News: ‘Untapped Resources’ For Building Security From The Ground Up – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

‘Untapped Resources’ For Building Security From The Ground Up – Analysis  Eurasia Review

By Viva Bartku*. Drug cartels and gangs have made Honduras one of the most violent places on Earth. The success of U.S. maritime interdiction operations in …

“International Security” – Google News

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (88 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

“mueller” – Google News: Why is Nancy Pelosi slamming AOC and helping Trump? – CNN

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Feedly Logo
July 07, 2019

“mueller” – Google News: Why is Nancy Pelosi slamming AOC and helping Trump? – CNN
“fbi surveillance” – Google News: Inspector General Reaches ‘Breakthrough’ With Key Witness In FISA Abuse Probe – The Daily Wire
“fbi and trump” – Google News: Our new Saddam Hussein – The Washington Post
Alerta de Google: fbi: FBI And ICE Using Driver’s License Photos Without Consent For Facial Recognition Searches
Alerta de Google: fbi: The FBI and ICE Are Using Your DMV Photos to Run Facial Recognition Searches

“mueller” – Google News: Why is Nancy Pelosi slamming AOC and helping Trump? – CNN

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
The latest example came Sunday when the New York Times’ Maureen Dowd reported that Pelosi had slammed four of the most vocal and visible freshman House members, Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts.
Read More

“fbi surveillance” – Google News: Inspector General Reaches ‘Breakthrough’ With Key Witness In FISA Abuse Probe – The Daily Wire

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz reportedly has reached a “breakthrough” in the government’s investigation into alleged FISA abuse against the Trump campaign as at least one witness has started to cooperate in the investigation.
Read More

“fbi and trump” – Google News: Our new Saddam Hussein – The Washington Post

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Jackson Diehl Deputy editorial page editor and columnist focusing on international affairs Deputy Editorial Page Editor July 7 at 6:40 PM Once upon a time, there was a brutal and reckless dictator of an oil-rich Arab country who, despite his well-documented excesses, was stroked and supported by the United States and other Western governments.
Read More

Alerta de Google: fbi: FBI And ICE Using Driver’s License Photos Without Consent For Facial Recognition Searches

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
FBI and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents have reportedly been using hundreds of millions of state driver’s license photos for facial recognition searches without the knowledge or consent of the Americans holding the licenses.
Read More

Alerta de Google: fbi: The FBI and ICE Are Using Your DMV Photos to Run Facial Recognition Searches

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Photo: Justin Sullivan/GettyRecords reviewed by the Washington Post show that the FBI and ICE have been scanning through Americans’ state driver’s license photos using facial recognition technology without consent.
Read More
Feeling mobile? Get the Feedly app and read on the go
GooglePlay Store App


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites): Palmer Report: The surreal timeline of Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Jeffrey Epstein’s arrest

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  


All week long, strange things kept happening that didn’t fit together unless there was a larger piece of the puzzle that we couldn’t see. Donald Trump making an oddly specific attempt at distraction. Mike Pence disappearing and the White House refusing to admit why. Then last night a very big puzzle piece indeed emerged.


Last night Donald Trump’s old friend Jeffrey Epstein, who was previously let off the hook for child molestation by Trump’s current Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta, was arrested on new charges of sex trafficking. The Epstein indictment won’t be unsealed until court is in session tomorrow, so for now we have more questions than answers. But the timeline of the past week is certainly surreal.



It began on Tuesday morning when Mike Pence’s planned trip to New Hampshire was called off at the last second. The White House couldn’t get its story straight about whether Pence’s plane had to turn around or whether it never took off to begin with – making clear that whatever was happening, it was chaotic. The White House then blamed the whole thing on a security matter, but couldn’t say what it is, and vowed not to reveal it for weeks to come – suggesting that there’s another shoe to drop.




Clearly, something happened within the Trump regime on Tuesday that was a big enough deal to bring Mike Pence in on it, but embarrassing enough that the regime was frantic to cover it up. Then on Wednesday afternoon, Palmer Report documented what appeared to be a very calculated attempt by Donald Trump at creating a distraction, as he threw most of his greatest hits onto Twitter within an hour span. The distraction didn’t work, but it tipped off that Trump was expecting major bad news for him to drop at any minute. Then on Thursday, Trump put in a Fourth of July speech performance that was laughably bad even by his standards. Then on Saturday night, Epstein was arrested.


Again, we don’t know how these pieces fit together, or if they even do. But it’s entirely plausible that Attorney General William Barr tipped off Donald Trump on Tuesday that Epstein was going to be arrested soon, that Mike Pence was brought in to help plot strategy or calm Trump down, that by Wednesday afternoon Trump was panicking enough to try to create a distraction by any means possible, and that by Thursday night Trump was such a mess he was talking about airports in colonial times. We’ll find out soon enough; the Epstein arrest is going to make it very difficult to keep any of this stuff covered up much longer.

Click here to help fund Palmer Report’s editorial takedown of Donald Trump!



The post The surreal timeline of Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Jeffrey Epstein’s arrest appeared first on Palmer Report.

Palmer Report

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites): “michael flynn” – Google News: Major crash shuts down eastbound lanes on I-78 – NJ.com

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Major crash shuts down eastbound lanes on I-78  NJ.com

A crash on I-78 in Hunterdon County closed all eastbound lanes on Sunday evening.

“michael flynn” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites): “trump as gambler” – Google News: US wins 4th World Cup title, 2nd in a row, beats Dutch 2-0 – ktvo.com

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

US wins 4th World Cup title, 2nd in a row, beats Dutch 2-0  ktvo.com

LYON, France (AP) — Megan Rapinoe stood on the field, arms outstretched, striking her now trademark victory pose symbolizing the confidence of a U. S. team …

“trump as gambler” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites): “Donald Trump” – Google News: Donald Trump Slams “Failed” Fox News: “They Forgot The People Who Got Them There!” – Deadline

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Donald Trump Slams “Failed” Fox News: “They Forgot The People Who Got Them There!”  Deadline

Donald Trump decided to throw an early evening Twitter tantrum on Sunday, lumping in Fox News with news outlets he regularly complains about including …

“Donald Trump” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (197 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •