Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites): Eurasia Review: Digging Deeper: Rare Earth Metals And The US-China Trade War – Analysis

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By Felix K. Chang*

(FPRI) — In May 2019, Chinese President Xi Jinping made a well-publicized visit to a rare-earth-metals company in Jiangxi province. On the same day, he gave a speech in which he called on his country to prepare for a “new Long March” to overcome challenges from abroad. Taken together, they were seen as a signal that China might use its control over 90 percent of the world’s production of rare earth metals as leverage in its trade war with the United States. At any time, China could restrict or even embargo the export of the metals. In case that signal was not clear enough, an editorial from China’s state-run news agency made it crystal clear a week later. Reacting to the news, prices of most rare earth metals jumped 20 to 50 percent.

Why China’s leverage over rare earth
metals matters is because they are important to modern industry. Though
used in tiny quantities, often less than a gram, the metals are used in a
vast number of applications. They are needed in consumer products (like
fluorescent lamps and smartphones), industrial products (like aircraft
engines and wind turbines), and military systems (like radars and
sonars). But by far the biggest American use of rare earth metals is as a
catalyst in automotive catalytic converters, chemical processing, and
oil refining. These consume about 60 percent of all the rare earth
metals used in the United States today.

The 17 obscure elements, collectively called “rare earth metals,” are actually found all over the world.[1] For much of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States was self-sufficient in the metals, producing well over half of the world’s supply until the 1980s. But producing the metals requires not just mining ore, but also refining and smelting it, processes that separate the metals from the surrounding rock and each other. Unfortunately for the environment, the byproducts of those processes are highly toxic and can be radioactive. Since producing rare earth metals in such a manner was expensive in the United States, lower-cost Chinese production grew rapidly in the 1990s. A decade later, China came to dominate the world’s production of the metals, while American production all but ceased.[2]

The Visible (and Guiding) Hand

Beijing has long seen its rare-earth-metals industry as strategic. In 2016, China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology even outlined a five-year development plan for it with specific targets for production and value-chain improvements.[3] Hence, Beijing’s willingness to restrict the export of its rare earth metals to achieve national goals should surprise no one. Besides, China already did so once, and not all that long ago. In 2010, China imposed quotas on its rare earth metals exports, cutting what it supplied to the world by 40 percent.

At the time, there was speculation that China had imposed its export quotas in retaliation against Japan
because the quotas followed close on the heels of Japan’s detention of a
Chinese trawler that had collided with two Japanese coast guard ships
near the disputed Senkaku (Diaoyu in China) Islands in the East China
Sea. In retrospect, however, China probably had other reasons for
introducing its export quotas well before the incident occurred. One was
likely to give foreign rare-earth-metals smelting firms an incentive to
relocate their value-added processing plants to China. Another may have
been to help Beijing consolidate its fragmented rare-earth-metals
mining industry, whose small-scale miners and intense competition kept
prices for the metals low.

Whatever China’s intentions, its export
quotas definitely pushed up the prices for rare earth metals, some by as
much as 1,000 percent. That prompted the United States (and later the
European Union and Japan) to file a complaint with the World Trade
Organization (WTO) in 2012. After a two-year review, the WTO ruled in
favor of the United States. And so, in early 2015, China lifted its
export quotas, but replaced them with an export licensing regime.

The Invisible Hand

Nonetheless, long before the WTO ruling, the prices for most rare earth metals had already fallen sharply. By 2013, they returned to just above where they had traded before China’s export quotas were imposed. The reason why could be largely attributed to the market’s reaction to the high prices for the metals. On the supply side, they motivated rare-earth-metals miners elsewhere in the world to ramp up their production. The best-known mine in the United States (namely at Mountain Pass, California) was reopened, and new ones in Australia, Estonia, and Myanmar were expanded or developed. The high prices also had unintended consequences in China. They encouraged even more small-scale (and usually illegal) production, adding to China’s environmental woes, and led some of them to smuggle metals out of the country.[4]

On the demand side, the high prices
encouraged consumers of rare earth metals to find ways to reduce their
use. Within a year of China’s export quotas, substitutions for some metals had already been identified
for several applications, such as in glass polishing. The high prices
also encouraged greater recycling of the metals from fluorescent lamps
and cathode-ray tubes. And, though the high prices did not last long
enough for new alternatives for rare earth metals to be developed, they
did spur investment into research to do so.

Ultimately, most American companies were
able to cope with the higher rare-earth-metals prices. Given the
relatively small amount of metals that they needed and the rapid fall in
metals prices by 2013, companies generally absorbed the temporarily
high prices into their total manufacturing costs. However, some
companies could not dodge the higher prices so easily. One hard-hit
sector was the fluorescent-lamp industry. With no ready alternatives for
rare earth metals, companies, like General Electric, were forced to increase their retail prices for fluorescent lamps by over 40 percent.
That gave Chinese exporters the opportunity to gain market share by
selling cheaper fluorescent lamps, which eventually displaced American
ones.

Where Beijing’s export quotas on rare
earth metals had their biggest success was in shifting the landscape of
the global rare-earth-metals industry. Prior to the quotas, much of the
value-added smelting of rare earth metals took place in Japan. After the
quotas were introduced, many Japanese smelting firms relocated their
processing plants to China to avoid Chinese restrictions on
rare-earth-metals concentrate exports. That allowed China’s
rare-earth-metals industry to move further up the value chain and
strengthen its hold on the global smelting of the metals. And while
export quotas failed to help China consolidate its rare-earth-metals
industry, other government efforts had more success in the following
years. That consolidation drive continues today.

A New Rare-Earth-Metals Threat?

With the prices for rare earth metals
again rising, is Xi’s recent signal something the United States should
worry about? In the short run, it should; in the long run, not so much.
On the one hand, China’s dominance over global rare-earth-metals
production—for the moment—is probably even stronger than it was in 2010.
That is because of China’s greater control over its more consolidated
rare-earth-metals industry and larger share of the world’s
rare-earth-metals smelting capacity. But China’s most potent lever might
actually rest in its policy choice. Rather than restrict exports of
rare earth metals, it could ban their export altogether. As long as
domestic demand for the metals remains high in China, it could afford to
do that. No doubt such an embargo would put American businesses reliant
on the metals in a tight spot.

On the other hand, market participants have learned from their experience with China’s export quotas in 2010. Ever since then, they have been laying the foundation for an expansion of rare-earth-metals production. After all, rare earth metals are not very rare. New processing plants are being built in the United States and Malaysia.[5] Myanmar and Vietnam have accelerated their mining operations. And Brazil and Vietnam combined have reserves of rare earth metals that rival those in China. Furthermore, new reserves have been found. In 2011, Japan discovered major deposits of the metals on the seafloor near Minamitori Island in the Pacific Ocean. Should prices for rare earth metals rise high enough, Japan would likely find a way to mine them. Meanwhile, the world has developed new alternatives to rare earth metals. Some of them like quantum dots for electronic displays are already in use (and are ironically being exported to China).

Limits to Market Power

Market power over important commodities
is wonderful leverage to have. But it can be difficult to wield
effectively. Today, Chinese leaders appear to believe that they could
wield China’s current dominance over rare-earth-metals production to put
economic pressure on the United States in their trade war with it. That
may prove risky. Probably unsurprisingly, others have pursued similar
strategies in the past. One example was the Confederacy. Before the
American Civil War, the American South provided British and French
textile mills with 80 percent of their cotton. The Confederacy thought
it could use its dominance over cotton production as leverage to
pressure Britain and France into supporting its bid to secede from the
United States. It did not work. As the war went on, high prices for
cotton led to the development of new sources of it in Australia, Egypt,
and India.

As important as rare earth metals are to modern industry, they are still commodities—no different from cotton, gold, or oil. As such, rare earth metals are subject to the same laws of supply and demand that impact all commodities. And whenever short- and long-term supply and demand become out of step, prices of commodities can be volatile, either on the upside or downside. Overconfidence that prevailing supply and demand conditions will hold relatively steady has led many a technocrat astray. Beijing should remember that with time (and often not that much of it) the invisible hand of the market can undermine even the best-laid plans of men.

*About the author: Felix K. Chang is a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He is also the Chief Strategy Officer of DecisionQ, a predictive analytics company in the national security and healthcare industries.

Source: This article was published by FPRI


[1] The 17 elements are cerium, dysprosium, erbium, europium, gadolinium, holmium, lanthanum, lutetium, neodymium, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, scandium, terbium, thulium, ytterbium, and yttrium.

[2] National Research Council, Minerals, Critical Minerals, and the U.S. Economy (Washington: The National Academies Press, 2008), pp. 72-73.

[3] China Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Rare Earth Development Plan, 2016–2020 (2016), https://www.miit.gov.cn/n1146295/n1652858/n1652930/./5287774.doc.

[4] Nathaniel Taplin, “Rare Earths Are Only a Pawn in Trade Fight,” Wall Street Journal, Jun. 7, 2019, p. B12.

[5] Of the three rare-earth-metals processing plants being built in the United States, one will be ready in 2020 and two more in 2022.

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites): Eurasia Review: India’s Continuing Tussle Between Hindu Nationalists And Reformists – OpEd

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By Dr. Arshad M. Khan*

On the evening of January 30, 1948, as he
walked to his regular interfaith prayer meeting, Mahatma Gandhi was shot and
killed.  The assassin Nathuram Godse was
a Hindu nationalist who opposed Gandhi’s inclusiveness towards those of other
faiths, particularly Muslims. 

Manifested in its worst form in the
assassination of a revered figure, this conflict between liberal and
nationalist Hindus continues to this day. 
The chief minister of West Bengal, Mamata Banerjee, is the current target
of the Hindu nationalist BJP’s scorn.

In India’s recent general election, the
BJP and Narendra Modi the prime minister were returned to power with an
increased majority in the lower house of India’s parliament.  Their usual poor showing in West Bengal, even
though improved in this election, has led to comments designed to arouse public
ire — like the state has been turned into a mini-Pakistan.  It is worth noting that Gandhi’s killer was a
former member of the RSS, leaving it to form an armed group.  Also the RSS is considered the ideological
fountainhead of the BJP, and Mr. Modi continues to be a member. 

Not long ago Gauri Lankesh was murdered
outside her home for expressing liberal views. 
This time in the Kolkata disturbances against Banerjee, it was a bust of
a secular reformist liberal that was decapitated:  the venerated Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar
(1820-1891) was a lawyer, philosopher and reformist who contributed to
rationalizing the Bengali alphabet and prose, and fought for Hindu widows’
right to remarry.

But the difference between Hindu
nationalists and liberals is of earlier origin. 
In the 19th century, social reformers like Justice Mahadev Govind Ranade
were opposed by others like B. G. Tilak. 
If Ranade supported the Age of Consent Bill raising the age when girls
could be married from 10 to 12, then Tilak thought it to be an interference by
foreigners in Indian customs and traditions. 
Tilak had also formed cow protection societies raising communal tensions
in his Bombay base — sound familiar to the present situation where meat eaters
and leather tanners are often targeted? 
Ranade sought to keep religion private and foresaw the potential
conflict

The practice of celebrating the birthday
of the god Ganesh was old and the ‘puja’ or worship usually performed in the
home.  Tilak now encouraged a public
‘puja’, encouraging people to bring the Ganesh idols out of their homes and
celebrate openly.  The festival of loud
music and idols in procession continues to this day and is now spread out over
ten days.

The consequences had been predicted by
Tilak’s reformist adversaries, notably Justice Ranade and G. G. Agarkar, the
latter a friend 0f Tilak who had become a critic.  In September 1893, Bombay suffered its first
communal riot leaving nearly 100 dead and 500 injured.  Minor clashes had already occurred over the
incessantly loud music and general disruption of daily activity.

The religious flavor so imparted to the independence movement gave pause to Muslims; the glue binding secular society was being dissolved.  Feeling marginalized, they soon formed the Muslim League to protect their rights, and not long thereafter began to demand a separate homeland … Pakistan. 

*About the author: Dr. Arshad M. Khan is a former Professor based in the US. Educated at King’s College London, OSU and The University of Chicago, he has a multidisciplinary background that has frequently informed his research. Thus he headed the analysis of an innovation survey of Norway, and his work on SMEs published in major journals has been widely cited. He has for several decades also written for the press: These articles and occasional comments have appeared in print media such as The Dallas Morning News, Dawn (Pakistan), The Fort Worth Star Telegram, The Monitor, The Wall Street Journal and others. On the internet, he has written for Antiwar.com, Asia Times, Common Dreams, Counterpunch, Countercurrents, Dissident Voice, Eurasia Review and Modern Diplomacy among many. His work has been quoted in the U.S. Congress and published in its Congressional Record.

Source: This article was published by Modern Diplomacy

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites): Eurasia Review: The Last Thing Europe Needs Is To Further Loosen The EU’s Fiscal Rules – OpEd

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By Pietro Bullian and Pietro Mistura*

The
environment of persistently low interest rates is not going to last
forever. But a recent drive to change European fiscal rules assumes low
rates forever, and may have dangerous and unintended consequences. So
far, after years of continuous growth, many European countries have not
yet tackled the issue of debt: will they be able to do better with
looser and less punitive rules?

In the aftermath of the European elections, the race to describe
which (different) path the European Union should undertake has started.
Among those who contributed with reform proposals, we find the IMF’s
Olivier Blanchard, in his column “Europe Must Fix Its Fiscal Rules,” explained how Europe could better take advantage of the current low interest rate framework.

According to French economist Blanchard, Europe must begin to fix its
rules about public debt and public deficit to align them with the
current low-interest framework, which is different to the one the rules
were initially written for. Admittedly, the fiscal-arm of the European
economic-policy is surely something that can be improved. Nevertheless,
Dr. Blanchard’s proposals would work as a shield for fiscally
irresponsible policies put in place by countries now most in need of
reform. These countries —especially Italy — have been putting off these
needed reforms for years, and that have largely taken advantage of the
east-money policies of crisis periods to do so.

A Closer Economic and Monetary Union?

Some parts of Dr. Blanchard’s proposal do indeed raise questions. The
idea of creating a larger common European budget, in fact, is the
notorious third pillar of an economic and monetary union which has been
missing in the eurozone framework from its very beginning. One aspect of
this are ongoing demands that the eurozone change the Growth and
Stability Pact to abandon the 3% deficit cap and the 60% debt/GDP cap.
Regarding the debt parameter, Dr. Blanchard argues that under a low
interest rate regime, the need to have such a low debt/GDP ratio is
questionable. Hence, Europe must allow its member states to coordinate
and carry out a fiscal expansion, either at an individual level or with a
common budget financed through the issuing of the often invoked
eurobonds.

The Keynesian, centrist reading of the European reality, however,
does not take into account any of the concerns about the moral hazard
which is intrinsic to any monetary union. Moreover, it does not take
into account the recent history of the debate over the budget proposals
between the European Commission and the member states. In fact, Dr.
Blanchard is of the view that “The eurozone has gone so far in piling up
constraints, on the assumption that governments will always misbehave
or try to cheat, that the result is sometimes incomprehensible.”

On the contrary, we are of the opinion that what the eurozone history
can tell us, is that if the increase in debt was contained during
recent times, that was exactly thanks to those constraints and
rules, since southern member states (i.e., Italy and Greece, et al) have
always pushed for more debt and never for less.

Moreover, we do not understand the need for a Keynesian fiscal
stimulus to push the eurozone back to its “potential level.” For
example, the European Commission calculated for Italy (one of the
countries which would benefit the most from a loosening of the eurozone
fiscal rules) a -0,1% negative output-gap for 2018 and a -0,3% negative
output-gap for 2019, which they predict will close again in 2020. That
considered, to increase the fiscal room of a country like Italy would
mean to permanently enlarge the public sector, since to boost GDP beyond
its potential level the stimulus must be perpetrated indefinitely.

The path that has brought interest rates down to the zero lower-bound
has not been coincidental either, but it has been a direct consequence
of the policy carried out in these years by the ECB. Thanks to those
policies, which have had a Cantillon-effect backlash that have modified
the relative prices of government bonds for the sake of countries with
larger debts. Those very member states with troubling and urgent issues
have been able to “kick the can” and ignore the risk-pricing assessments
made by the market because of the protection and the extended time
granted to them by the quantitative easing.

All this contradicts what Dr. Blanchard implicitly argued about moral
hazard: the expansive monetary policy and consequent lowering of the
interest rates — which was meant to grant time and breathing room to the
troubled countries to fix their numbers while allowing them at the same
time to use fiscal policy as a cyclical tool — was instead used to put
off the need for decisions and reforms that was already compelling years
ago, worsening those structural problems that hold to the present
disappointing level their potential GDP.

To remove those rules would allow a serious situation not to become far worse. The current interest rate scenario is not going to last forever, but it will indeed change as soon as the quantitative easing of the ECB comes to an end. Removing what few restraints exist strikes us as an unnecessary hazard.

*About the authors:

  • Pietro Bullian is an economics student at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore.
  • Pietro Mistura has an economics student at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore.

Source: This article was published by the MISES Institute

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites): Eurasia Review: Responsible Business A Crucial Factor In Keeping Asia-Pacific On Track To Achieve The SDGs

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Businesses are well-positioned to offer innovative solutions to key sustainable development challenges, particularly in meeting the infrastructure and connectivity needs of rural and urban communities, concluded the annual Asia-Pacific Business Forum (APBF) in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea on Friday.

Organized by the United
Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP),
the Government of Papua New Guinea and the Papua New Guinea Investment
and Promotion Authority, with the support
of the Business Council of Papua New Guinea, the Forum showcased bold,
innovative and truly sustainable business solutions in sectors such as
infrastructure, green financing, financial inclusion, climate and
disaster resilience, as well as trade and investment.

The two-day APBF focused
on the theme of “Global Goals, Local Opportunities”. Senior
policymakers, business leaders and emerging entrepreneurs discussed the
roles and responsibilities of businesses to work with
the public sector to mitigate the impacts of climate change and support
the development of non-urban Pacific communities.

“Connectivity is
especially relevant in the Pacific context, where the challenges
associated with geographic isolation and remoteness have hindered trade
and investment among Pacific island countries and with major
international markets. Enhancing connectivity in this subregion demands
increased investments in transport networks and ICT infrastructure,”
said UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of ESCAP, Ms.
Armida Salsiah Alisjahbana in her opening remarks.

Ms. Alisjahbana called
upon public-private sector partnerships to support SME growth and
women’s entrepreneurship in the region. “Unlocking the potential of
women-owned business represents a powerful opportunity
for greater economic growth and leadership in our economies. A stronger
Asia and the Pacific demands novel strategies to overcome entrenched
barriers to women owned and led businesses and entrepreneurships.”

Prime Minister of Papua
New Guinea Honorable James Marape said “Our priority is to empower our
local business women and men. We have set a goal of growing our local
SME spaces so that 10-20% our citizens are anchored
in the SME sectors. Aligned with the focus of the APBF, our key
priority sectors for SME growth are agriculture, tourism and marine
resources. We are keen to work with foreign investors to sustainably
develop these industries and our SMEs in them.”

“To implement the 17
Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 is not a simple task. One
condition for success is to engage the private sector well. For
businesses to work towards the SDGs, we need platforms such as
the Asia-Pacific Business Forum to bring together world business
leaders.” said George Lam, the President of the ESCAP Sustainable
Business Network (ESBN).

“Vanuatu is leading the
way in promoting business resilience to climate change. Resources exist
in the country and we need to start using them more. That’s why Vanuatu
set up a business resilience committee to
assist businesses get together to find their own solutions without
depending on external parties that may not understand the local business
environment.” said Shaun Gilchrist, President Vanuatu Chamber of
Commerce, CEO Azure Water. He added “innovation, product
diversification and daring to dream at the regional level will help us
address shared regional challenges”.

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites): Eurasia Review: In The Thick Of Syria And Iraq: ‘Days Of The Fall: A Reporter’s Journey In The Syria And Iraq Wars’ – Review

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Author and journalist Jonathan Spyer’s latest book explores the disintegration of the Middle East over the past decade. Days of the Fall: A Reporter’s Journey in the Syria and Iraq Wars is an up-close and personal account of the two major conflicts in the region that exemplify its descent into chaos, both physical and moral.

Spyer had been focusing on the Levant in general, and Syria in particular, for a good few years before President Bashar al-Assad’s regime was caught up in the revolutionary fervour sweeping across the Arab world.

As the Arab Spring, sparked just before the end of 2010 in Tunisia, spread like wildfire across the region, some of its leaders began to be consumed in the flames. January 2011 marked the fall of Tunisia’s president. In February Egypt’s Mubarak was overthrown. In March, Assad’s Syria was set ablaze as pro-democracy protests erupted following the arrest and torture of some teenagers who had painted revolutionary slogans on a school wall. When security forces opened fire on demonstrators, nationwide protests demanded Assad’s resignation.

“As soon as the uprising began,” writes Spyer, “I started to bother my Syrian contacts to get into the country.”

He succeeded, and there followed a series of intrepid, hair-raising incursions into the very heart of the conflict in Syria itself, and later into neighboring Iraq. Dicing with death on more than one occasion, Spyer managed to infiltrate heavily guarded borders, sometimes crawling at night through mud and under barbed wire to do so, and then undergoing the same unpleasant experience to get himself out again. Sometimes it required the risky business of bribing security guards. In each war zone that he penetrated Spyer interviewed a wide variety of people, civilians and fighters, affected one way or another by the conflict that had overwhelmed them.

It is through his account of these personal, sometimes moving, always thrilling adventures, that the broader political story of the past few years emerges. As Spyer reminds us, it is a story not yet concluded.

Given the extent of the revolutionary ardour sweeping across the Arab world, and the fate of several of its leaders, it seemed to many in the early days of Syria’s uprising as though Assad‘s days of power were numbered. “How long until Assad is destroyed?” Spyer asked a Salafi rebel fighter, on his first incursion into conflict-torn Syria. “I give it roughly a month,” was the reply. And yet the regime clung on.

The US and other western governments had ruled out taking direct military action in support of the opposition, and they stuck to this policy even when, in the spring of 2013, evidence emerged that Assad, indifferent to the collateral misery inflicted on innocent civilians, had used chemical weapons against the rebels.

Spyer believes that it was this spineless US and western stance that enabled the regime to transform almost certain defeat into what may turn out to be nearly complete victory. Undisguised brutality and an unrestrained use of military force were the hallmark of Assad’s approach. Spyer asserts that his backers – Iran and Russia – saw the world as he did. “Assad, Iran and Russia tested the will of the tired hegemon, and it was found wanting.”

Not the least impressive of Spyer’s achievements over the course of the Syrian conflict was how, often carrying an Israeli passport concealed about his person, he managed to evade detection as he came and went in one of the world’s major conflict zones. He found himself relying on dubious contacts who could have betrayed him at any time. Western journalists were being caught, kidnapped, and sometimes executed. Spyer had more than one hairbreadth escape.

On one occasion, in a vehicle crammed full of Muslim refugees who might have turned on him had they known he was an Israeli, he had to show his passport to a Turkish security officer. Luckily for him the distinguishing gold symbol on the cover had been quite rubbed away from its long concealment about his person, and what he presented seemed to have an innocuous plain blue cover.

For another assignment – to Damascus in 2017 – Spyer had to adopt a false name and a concocted identity. In deep cover, expecting to be unmasked at any moment, he joined a delegation of pro-Assad fellow travellers for an official tour of Aleppo, Homs and Damascus.

Nerve-wracking episodes like this were bound to take their toll. Spyer recalls that just after his return from a visit to Iraqi Kurdistan – a visit that nearly ended in his capture by Assad’s border guards – his voice suddenly disappeared, and he remained unable to speak for three or four days.

Days of the Fall chronicles the life-threatening missions undertaken by one journalist in pursuit of the human reality behind the conflicts in Syria and Iraq. At the same time Jonathan Spyer provides an authoritative background to the political events surrounding them. On both counts this is a book well worth reading.

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (51 sites)


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Twitter Search / PalmerReport: Donald Trump throws complete tantrum after his failed Iran stunt doesn’t get him anywhere https://www.palmerreport.com/analysis/iran-tantrum-failed-trump-stunt/18831 …

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Donald Trump throws complete tantrum after his failed Iran stunt doesn’t get him anywhere https://www.palmerreport.com/analysis/iran-tantrum-failed-trump-stunt/18831 …

Twitter Search / PalmerReport


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Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly – The Philadelphia Inquirer

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June 21, 2019

Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly – The Philadelphia Inquirer
Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Magazine columnist accuses Trump of sexual assault more than two decades ago, an allegation he denies – The Washington Post
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Washington Examiner Issues Correction That Discredits Claim NYTimes ‘Fed Info’ to FBI – Mediaite
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Trump Plans to Nominate Army’s Mark Esper as Defense Secretary – Yahoo Finance
“mueller” – Google News: Former High-Ranking Mueller Prosecutor Joins Paul Weiss – Law360

Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly – The Philadelphia Inquirer

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly The Philadelphia InquirerAn Inquirer review of a variety of data shows that there has been at least some change in prosecution of gun cases under DA Larry Krasner, while the U.S.
Read More

Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Magazine columnist accuses Trump of sexual assault more than two decades ago, an allegation he denies – The Washington Post

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Colby Itkowitz Congress, campaigns, health policy, Pennsylvania politics June 21 at 8:58 PM E. Jean Carroll, a New York-based writer and longtime women’s advice columnist, accused President Trump of sexually assaulting her more than two decades ago in a dressing room of an upscale Manhattan department store, an episode detailed in a book excerpt published Friday in New York magazine.
Read More

“fbi criticism” – Google News: Washington Examiner Issues Correction That Discredits Claim NYTimes ‘Fed Info’ to FBI – Mediaite

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Less than 24 hours after publishing a incendiary story claiming the New York Times “fed information” to the FBI about President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, the Washington Examiner issued a lengthy correction that wholly abandoned the article’s central premise.
Read More

“fbi criticism” – Google News: Trump Plans to Nominate Army’s Mark Esper as Defense Secretary – Yahoo Finance

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump plans to nominate Army Secretary Mark Esper for defense secretary following the messy withdrawal of the president’s previous choice, Acting Secretary Patrick Shanahan.
Read More

“mueller” – Google News: Former High-Ranking Mueller Prosecutor Joins Paul Weiss – Law360

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Law360 (June 21, 2019, 9:34 PM EDT) — Jeannie Rhee, a former leading prosecutor on special counsel Robert Mueller’s team, has joined Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP as a partner in the litigation department, the firm announced Friday.
Read More
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The FBI News Review: Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly – The Philadelphia Inquirer

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June 21, 2019
Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly – The Philadelphia Inquirer
Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Magazine columnist accuses Trump of sexual assault more than two decades ago, an allegation he denies – The Washington Post
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Washington Examiner Issues Correction That Discredits Claim NYTimes ‘Fed Info’ to FBI – Mediaite
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Trump Plans to Nominate Army’s Mark Esper as Defense Secretary – Yahoo Finance
“mueller” – Google News: Former High-Ranking Mueller Prosecutor Joins Paul Weiss – Law360

Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly – The Philadelphia Inquirer

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Criminal justice system at center of swirling debate as gun violence continues in Philly The Philadelphia InquirerAn Inquirer review of a variety of data shows that there has been at least some change in prosecution of gun cases under DA Larry Krasner, while the U.S.
Read More

Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (10 sites): “political crimes” – Google News: Magazine columnist accuses Trump of sexual assault more than two decades ago, an allegation he denies – The Washington Post

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Colby Itkowitz Congress, campaigns, health policy, Pennsylvania politics June 21 at 8:58 PM E. Jean Carroll, a New York-based writer and longtime women’s advice columnist, accused President Trump of sexually assaulting her more than two decades ago in a dressing room of an upscale Manhattan department store, an episode detailed in a book excerpt published Friday in New York magazine.
Read More

“fbi criticism” – Google News: Washington Examiner Issues Correction That Discredits Claim NYTimes ‘Fed Info’ to FBI – Mediaite

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Less than 24 hours after publishing a incendiary story claiming the New York Times “fed information” to the FBI about President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, the Washington Examiner issued a lengthy correction that wholly abandoned the article’s central premise.
Read More

“fbi criticism” – Google News: Trump Plans to Nominate Army’s Mark Esper as Defense Secretary – Yahoo Finance

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump plans to nominate Army Secretary Mark Esper for defense secretary following the messy withdrawal of the president’s previous choice, Acting Secretary Patrick Shanahan.
Read More

“mueller” – Google News: Former High-Ranking Mueller Prosecutor Joins Paul Weiss – Law360

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (28 sites)
Law360 (June 21, 2019, 9:34 PM EDT) — Jeannie Rhee, a former leading prosecutor on special counsel Robert Mueller’s team, has joined Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP as a partner in the litigation department, the firm announced Friday.
Read More
Feeling mobile? Get the Feedly app and read on the go
GooglePlay Store App

The FBI News Review


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Twitter Search / PalmerReport: Donald Trump’s Fourth of July stunt is already turning into a debacle https://www.palmerreport.com/analysis/donald-trumps-fourth-of-july-stunt-is-already-turning-into-a-debacle/18817 …

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Donald Trump’s Fourth of July stunt is already turning into a debacle https://www.palmerreport.com/analysis/donald-trumps-fourth-of-july-stunt-is-already-turning-into-a-debacle/18817 …

Twitter Search / PalmerReport


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