The Trump Investigations Report – Review Of News And Opinions: Improving Intelligence Analysis by Looking to the Medical Profession – By STEPHEN MARRIN and JONATHAN D. CLEMENTE | FBI News Review

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Improving Intelligence Analysis by Looking to the Medical Profession – By STEPHEN MARRIN and JONATHAN D. CLEMENTE – Post

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Multi Layered approach to Intelligence and Counterintelligence

Intelligence Analysis and medical diagnosis – GS

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Improving Intelligence Analysis by Looking to the Medical Profession – Google Search

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STEPHEN MARRIN and JONATHAN D. CLEMENTE

Improving Intelligence Analysis by

Looking to the Medical Profession

Intelligence agencies might benefit from assessing existing medical practices

for possible use in improving the accuracy of intelligence analysis and its

incorporation into policymaking. The processes used by the medical

profession to ensure diagnostic accuracy may provide specific models for

Intelligence Community use that could improve the accuracy of analytic

procedures. The medical profession’s way of accumulation, organization,

and use of information for purposes of decisionmaking could also provide

a model for the national security field to adopt in its quest for more

effective means of information transfer. Some limitations to the analogy

areinevitableduetointrinsicdifferences between the fields, but the study

of medicine could provide intelligence practitioners with a valuable source

of insight into various reforms with the potential to improve the craft of

intelligence.

A LITTLE-EXAMINED ANALOGY

The analogy between medical diagnosis and intelligence analysis has been a

thin thread running through the intelligence literature. In 1983, historian

Walter Laqueur, in ‘‘The Question of Judgment: Intelligence and

Medicine,’’

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examined the analogy at a general level. He argued that

Stephen Marrin is a doctoral candidate in the Woodrow Wilson Department of

Politics at the University of Virginia, specializing in the study of intelligence. He

previously served as an analyst with the Central Intelligence Agency and

subsequently with the Congressional Government Accountability Office (GAO).

Jonathan D. Clemente, M.D., is a physician in private practice in Charlotte, North

Carolina. He is currently writing a scholarly history of the United States medical

intelligence program and medical support for clandestine operations from World

WarIItothepresent.

International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence, 18: 707–729, 2005

Copyright #Taylor & Francis Inc.

ISSN: 0885-0607 print=1521-0561 online

DOI: 10.1080/08850600590945434

AND COUNTERINTELLIGENCE VOLUME 18, NUMBER 4 707

medicine is more an art than a science because the process of diagnosis entails

the use of judgment as a means to address ambiguous signs and symptoms.

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The Trump Investigations Report – Review Of News And Opinions


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