Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: More Plastic Bags Than Fish? East Asia’s New Environmental Threat – Analysis

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Marine plastic pollution is the new environmental threat facing mankind. This is also afflicting East Asia where six countries are major pollutants. While some in the region have started tackling this new menace, more can be done by all.

By Lina Gong*

The United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) convened the 4th Session of the UN Environment Assembly in Nairobi Kenya from 11 to 15 March 2019 to discuss strategies to meet the environmental and climate-related challenges as outlined in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. Among the areas discussed include the protection of oceans, with a specific focus on curbing marine plastic pollution.

This reflects the growing threats posed by marine plastic wastes as a
report released at the World Economic Forum in 2016 predicted that
there would be more plastic waste than fish by 2050 without effective
intervention. The conference adopted resolutions on promoting
sustainable development, including one that calls for cooperation in
reducing marine plastic debris. The increasing emphasis on the
protection of marine environments has also been seen in East Asia.

Marine Plastic Debris in Regional Seas

Countries in East Asia have been confronted by the threats posed by
the growing amount of marine plastic debris in regional seas. According
to a report by the Ocean Conservancy and the McKinsey Centre for
Business and Environment in 2015, China, Indonesia, the Philippines,
Vietnam and Thailand accounted for 60 percent of the plastic waste
disposed in the oceans across the globe. Japan ranks second globally at
the per capita level.

Marine plastic pollution therefore can threaten the security and
development of regional countries in many ways. It destroys the marine
ecosystem by killing sea creatures and polluting the marine environment.
Microplastics enter our food train as people consume seafood and fish
that are contaminated. This can be a potential threat to food safety and
public health across Asia as many people in the region rely on seafood
for protein intake.

Unsustainable practices in the marine-related economic sectors in the
region have contributed to the surging amount of plastic debris in
regional seas, which in turn harms the performance of themselves
eventually. For islands like Bali and Boracay that depend heavily on
revenues from tourism, severe plastic pollution in the coastal areas
damages their reputation as popular tourist destinations. Disruption in
the marine ecosystem can also intensify competition between states for
marine resources.

East Asian Countries in Action

In recognition of the severity of the challenge, countries in the
region have taken actions. At the national level, countries are
strengthening efforts tackling the challenge. Indonesia has set the
target to reduce marine plastic debris by 70 percent by 2025. To this
end, the central government for instance imposed a trial of taxing
single-use plastic bags in some cities in 2016 and pledged in 2017 one
billion US dollars to reduce marine plastic debris and other wastes.

In Singapore, the government has also increased attention to its
marine landscape. The National Parks Board in collaboration with the
International Coastal Cleanup, an environmental NGO, started a joint
two-year study in 2017 to monitor debris and microplastics at nine
coastal sites. Conservatists and scientists presented a report, titled The Blue Plan, to the government in October 2018, which included recommendations on how to monitor and reduce marine plastic waste.

Vietnam and the Philippines are developing national action plan or
strategy to deal with the mounting challenge. The Japanese government
started in August 2018 the discussion a draft national strategy with
specific goals and targets. There are also discussions on strengthening
regulations and laws related to the issue. For instance, Japan passed a
bill in June 2018 aimed at reducing microplastics.

The common awareness of the increasing threat of marine plastic
debris constitutes a foundation for joint regional efforts. From 28 to
29 October 2018, Indonesia held the Our Ocean Conference in Bali, during
which Indonesia together with New Zealand and Japan initiated the call
for regional cooperation in tackling marine plastic waste and invited
regional countries to join the initiative. Subsequently the East Asia
Summit (EAS) adopted the Leaders’ Statement on Combating Marine Plastic
Debris in November 2018.

Further Indonesia is now pushing for developing a Regional Plan of
Action to be adopted in the EAS in 2019. Thailand as the Chair of ASEAN
also sees addressing the issue of marine plastic debris as part of its
overall effort in promoting sustainability through cooperation and
partnership. ASEAN held the Special Ministerial Meeting on Marine Debris
in Bangkok on 5 March 2019, to discuss how the region as a whole can
address the challenge through strengthened cooperation. A regional
declaration on combating marine plastic wastes is likely to be presented
to the ASEAN leaders later this year.

Moving Forward

The increasing attention to marine plastic waste reduction has
entailed strengthened government commitments to and public awareness
about the issue. To reduce marine plastic debris and microplastics more
effectively, a holistic approach is necessary. It should include not
only restriction or prohibition of the use of single-use plastic
products but also improvement in waste management, legislation, law
enforcement, transformation of consumption and production, financing and
application of technology.

Despite the increasing awareness and commitments, challenges and
barriers remain. Restriction over the use of single-use plastic products
is likely to increase business costs and thus meet resistance from the
business community, which may influence government policies. For
instance, while the Indonesian government started in 2018 drafting a
regulation to tax plastic bags, the draft is still being debated by
different ministries and the release is likely to be later than
expected.

Moreover, reducing single-use plastic products and increasing
recycling means gradual changes in people’s habit of consumption. To
seek public understanding and cooperation, awareness-raising and
incentives are necessary at the initial phase. Grass-root groups, both
governmental and non-governmental, are on the forefront to facilitate
changes.

The Philippines and Thailand respectively closed down tourist islands
in 2018 to tackle coastal and marine pollution including plastic waste,
but this raised the concern over the livelihood of the local
communities dependent on the tourist industry. Therefore, incentives and
alternatives are needed to ensure the understanding and cooperation
from these actors.

Technological advancement that makes the degrading of plastic less
harmful for the environment also contributes to the solution. Japan
initiated cooperation with ASEAN in this area by providing technological
and financial support for the Knowledge Centre on ASEAN Marine Debris.
The epistemic community and private sector have important roles in terms
of providing technological expertise and financing schemes. A holistic
approach that addresses different dimensions of marine plastic pollution
and involves multiple actors is essential for effective solutions to
the challenge.

*Lina Gong is a Research Fellow with the Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS Centre) at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: New To College? Spend Some Time Alone

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Transitioning from high school to college can be stressful. Trying to
fit in, making new friends, missing old ones and home, meeting
professors’ and one’s own expectations–can all be daunting.

The way that first-year students manage (or not) to navigate this
change has long-term implications for their academic performance and
ability to stick with their studies. Research has shown that one
frequent pitfall during this transition period from high school to
college is social isolation. Loneliness, of course, can have a serious
detrimental effect on a student’s mental health, potentially leading to
depression.

But being alone isn’t necessarily bad, argues a team of researchers from the University of Rochester, Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, and Ghent University in Belgium. They published their findings about the importance of me-time in the journal Motivation and Emotion.

“Approaching solitude for its enjoyment and intrinsic values is linked to psychological health, especially for those who don’t feel as if they belong to their social groups,” says the study’s lead author, Thuy-vy Nguyen, who received her doctorate in psychology from the University of Rochester in 2018 and who undertook large part of the research for this study in Rochester.

“These findings highlight the importance of cultivating the ability to enjoy and value solitary time as a meaningful experience, rather than trying to disregard it, or escape from it,” says Nguyen, who’ll be joining the psychology department at Durham University, England, this fall as an assistant professor.

Loneliness versus alone time

What then marks the difference between useful and potentially
detrimental solitude? The key is positive motivation, according to the
researchers. A healthy, autonomous seeking of alone time is associated
with greater self-esteem, a greater sense of feeling related to others,
and feeling less lonely. Conversely, someone who wants to be alone
because of negative social experiences will more likely experience the
negative effects of solitude, such as isolation or social withdrawal.
The reasons matter as they determine how we experience solitude and the
benefits we can get from it, the study concludes.

Nguyen is building on decades of research by her veteran Rochester mentors, Edward Deci and Richard Ryan, co-founders of self-determination theory (SDT). The theoretical framework of SDT fits nicely into the investigation of how individuals’ motivations for spending time alone contribute to well-being, the researchers note. Per definition, autonomous motivation for being alone refers to a person’s decision to spend time in solitude in a manner that is valuable and enjoyable for the person.

Previous research had shown that spending too much time socializing
during the first year of college–and as a result having little time for
oneself–may be associated with poor adjustment.

But over the course of two studies, conducted with 147 first-year
college students in the US (testing for self-esteem) and 223 in Canada
(testing for loneliness and relatedness), the team was able to untangle
the interaction between new students’ social life and their motivation
for spending time alone as a predictor of their successful adjustment to
college life.

Nguyen says the interplay between solitary time and our social
experiences has not been empirically studied before, at least not in
this way.

“In previous research, it has been framed in ways that those with
more access to social connections tend to have a better time in
solitude. But in our study, having a healthy motivation for solitude
actually is associated with wellness for those who have less access to
social connections,” says Nguyen.

The findings in a nutshell:

  • First-year students who valued and enjoyed their alone time seemed to display greater psychological health
  • Solitary time can be useful for detaching oneself from societal pressures and getting back to one’s own values and interests, which in turn allows for better behavior regulation (with a greater sense of autonomy, choice, and self-concordance)
  • The association between freely chosen motivation for solitude and psychological health is stronger for those who don’t feel they belong in college
  • The findings held across two independent samples of first-year students–one at a private university in the US and one at a public university in Canada
  • Parents play a role in shaping their children’s capacity to be alone by allowing children time for independent play.
  • The study provides empirical evidence for the theory formulated by English pediatrician and psychoanalyst Donald Woods Winnicott in the 1950s.

What do the researchers wish they had known as a green, first-year student?

“I wish I had known to worry less,” says Nguyen. The transition to
college can be difficult with the pressure to socialize and make new
friends, she notes. However, it’s important to consider that alone time
is also valuable.

“At times we do want time to ourselves, to relax, so it is OK to take time for that as well,” says Nguyen.

“Being alone does not make you a loner, which is a very easy
stereotype to internalize when you first enter college–especially when
you think that everyone around you is socializing when you are not.
Solitude is a personal experience for everyone, so it is a time for you
to take if you want, and just explore different ways to make it a
meaningful and enjoyable experience for you.”

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: India: BJP Looks To Retain Power As Polls Open This Week

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By Jaishree Balasubramanian

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ruling alliance is widely
expected to win the 2019 general election that begins Thursday, but only
by a slim majority this time around, according to opinion polls and
analysts.

Starting April 11 and ending May 19, polls for 543 parliamentary
seats in the world’s most populous democracy will be held in seven
phases. Ninety-one of those seats will be contested when phase one
unfolds on Thursday in 18 states and two federally administered
territories.

The alliance led by Modi’s  Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party
(BJP) will be vying for control of the Lok Sabha, the lower house of
parliament, against the opposition Congress party, led by Rahul Gandhi,
as well as several other regional and national parties. Results are
expected to be announced on May 23.

“There is no visible wave as was so evident in the 2014 polls,” Smita
Gupta, a political analyst, told BenarNews, referring to a nationwide
euphoria that drove BJP to a landslide win in the last general election.

In northern Uttar Pradesh (UP) state, which accounts for 80
parliamentary seats, local issues such as produce prices and cows
destroying crops are coming to the surface, Gupta said.

“But Prime Minister Modi remains a major factor,” she said.

Political parties will battle for parliamentary seats in UP during all seven stages of the election.

“It is a tough contest in every single seat, even the BJP there
admits it,” Gupta said. in 2014, BJP won 71 seats in Uttar Pradesh,
which represents the largest number of seats.

A pre-poll survey conducted by the Center for the Study of Developing
Societies indicated that BJP might garner 222 to 232 seats compared
with a total of 283 in the 2014 polls. The BJP and its alliance together
is expected to only get a slim majority, it said, because of a more
“united opposition” in key states.

“[The] national mood appears to be to give the BJP and the National Democratic Alliance a second chance,” the survey said.

Kashmir

Smita Gupta, a senior fellow at the think-tank Hindu Centre for
Politics and Public Policy, said the BJP’s popularity soared after New
Delhi demolished an alleged militant training camp in Pakistani
territory with an airstrike.

The airstrike followed a suicide bombing that killed 40 Indian troops
and was claimed by the Pakistan-based militant group Jaish-e-Muhammad
(JeM) in the Indian side of the disputed Kashmir region. It then led to
aerial engagements between India and Pakistan, which both claimed in
February that they had shot down each other’s fighter jets over each
other’s territory.

Modi, who is seeking re-election, drummed up support based on a surge
of patriotism after he ordered fighter jets to bomb the suspected JeM
camp in Balakot, Pakistan, analysts said.

But India’s nationalistic fervor has dissipated after the two
nuclear-armed neighbors pulled back from military confrontation,
analysts said.

“Balakot is not so on top of the minds of people now, maybe it is in
some places,” Gupta said. “It was there immediately after it happened.
At that time, it was strong.”

BJP’s election manifesto has listed national security, produce
prices, Kashmir and illegal immigration as core issues to woo India’s
nearly 900 million voters.

The party promised to scrap the decades-old special rights accorded
to people living in Jammu and Kashmir, saying those rights affect the
state’s integration with the rest of the country.

On Tuesday, the last official day of campaigning, Modi urged
first-time voters to dedicate their first ballot to the Indian fighter
pilots who carried out the airstrike in Balakot and also the troops who
were killed in the suicide bombing in Indian Kashmir’s Pulwama district.

“I want to ask my first-time voters, can your first vote be dedicated
to the soldiers who conducted the Balakot air strikes?” he said. “Can
your first vote be in the name of the martyrs who lost their lives in
Pulwama?”

Residents in Indian-controlled Kashmir, a violence-hit region
demarcated by a de facto boundary known as Line of Control (LoC), are
expected to vote to elect six parliamentarians over five phases of
polls.

Separatists and militants have asked people to boycott the elections.
However, people have defied the orders, attending election rallies in
the state in large numbers.

The northeast

Another key electoral contest will be in the northeastern states,
which had been a bastion for the Congress party for many years, but
where the BJP made significant inroads in the 2014 polls.

Twenty-five parliamentary seats across eight states in the region are
up for grabs, with Assam – the biggest state that shares a border with
Bangladesh – accounting for 14 seats.

But BJP faces stiff competition from various parties in this election
after it tried to get support for a Citizenship Amendment Bill, which
aims to give citizenship to persecuted Hindus, Sikhs, Parsis and
Buddhists from neighboring countries, observers said.

“Locals of the region are under fear that if the bill is passed, it
will make way for thousands of Hindu Bangladeshis to settle in the
region, leading to them outnumbering the indigenous population,”
Professor Monirul Hussain, a political analyst based in Guwahati, Assam,
told BenarNews.

“So, this issue may act as a dampener in the party’s election prospects in the region,” he said.

Mohammad Amin Pirzada in Srinagar and Jhumur Deb in Guwahati, India, contributed to this report.

Eurasia Review

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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): Reuters: World News: Japan imperial couple mark Diamond anniversary ahead of abdication

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Japanese Emperor Aikihito and Empress Michiko celebrated their Diamond anniversary on Wednesday, marking six decades of a marriage that helped modernize the monarchy.

Reuters: World News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): Voice of America: Living the Dream: Young Pakistani Wins Over Family to Let Her Sing

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Twenty-year-old Sana Tajik managed to convince her parents to allow her to follow her childhood dreams and become a singer, but she realizes the dangers of being a woman, let alone a woman entertainer, in tribal northwest Pakistan.

The Pashtun singer grew up in Lower Dir, once a Taliban stronghold of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, where performing arts were widely considered to be un-Islamic. She realized early on that violence against female artists was common.

In 2018, five female singers were killed in the northwest and in March this year, a popular Pashtun stage singer and actress was shot and killed near Peshawar, allegedly by her husband.

But two years ago, Tajik’s family moved from their ancestral village to the state capital Peshawar where she managed to convince her parents to allow her to sing.

“At first, there were a lot of objections, from family, as well as people in our village. But now, with the passing of time, and after seeing my videos and songs, things have become normal again,” Tajik told Reuters at her home.

She has released her songs over social media and said she already had a fan following in Pashto-speaking areas of Pakistan and neighboring Afghanistan. Her second song, “Halaka Charta Ye,” which means “Oh boy, where are you?,” was a great hit.

“I was extremely happy because so many people were listening to my songs and liked them. My passion for music increased further, and I decided to make more and more songs and videos,” she said.

Despite her success, Tajik says she often feels nervous about security because the Taliban’s influence in the region can still be felt. During the 1996-2001 Taliban regime in Afghanistan, music was considered the handiwork of the devil, particularly if the artist was a woman.

Pakistan’s port city of Karachi is home to an estimated 7 million Pashtuns, the largest urban Pashtun population in the world, including 50,000 registered Afghan refugees. Even though it’s the other end of the country, Sana Tajik’s music is known, though not accepted by all.

“If this lady sang hymns and devotional songs, that would have been better. It would have sent a good message to the Pashtun people,” said resident Iqbal Swati.

“Instead, she is wearing half-sleeved clothes while singing; this is not at all nice. This is not our culture.”

Tajik’s music teacher, Safdar Ali Qalandri, said he often warns her of the dangers ahead.

“One, she is a female. And secondly, this is Peshawar, where, as you know, extreme ‘purdah’ (covering of women) is observed. Taking up singing while living in this society is extremely tough.”

Voice of America

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites): Eurasia Review: Robert Reich: Socialism For The Rich, Capitalism For The Rest – OpEd

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“We renew our resolve that America will never be a socialist country,” Donald Trump said recently.

Someone
should alert him that America is now a hotbed of socialism. But it’s
socialism for the rich. Everyone else is treated to harsh capitalism.

In
the conservative mind, socialism means getting something for doing
nothing. This pretty much describes General Motors’ receipt of $600 million in federal contracts, plus $500 million in tax breaks, since Trump took office.

Some of this corporate welfare has gone into the pockets of GM executives. Chairman and CEO Mary Barra raked in almost $22 million in total compensation in 2017 alone.

But GM employees are subject to harsh capitalism. GM is planning to lay off more than 14,000 workers and close three assembly plants and two component factories in North America by the end of 2019.

The nation’s largest banks saved $21 billion last year thanks to Trump’s tax cuts, some of which went into massive bonuses for bank executives. On the other hand, thousands of lower-level bank employees got a big dose of harsh capitalism. They lost their jobs.

Banks that are too big to fail – courtesy of the 2008 bank bailout – enjoy a hidden subsidy of some $83 billion a year because they have the backing of the federal government. This hidden subsidy gives Wall Street, giant banks a huge advantage.

In 2017, Wall Street’s bonus pool was $31.4 billion.
So, take away the hidden subsidy, and that bonus pool disappears, along
with most profits. Trump and his appointees at the Federal Reserve are easing bank requirements put in place after the bailout. But they will make sure the biggest banks remain too big to fail.

When he was in business, Trump perfected the art of using bankruptcy to shield himself from the consequences of bad decisions
socialism for the rich at its worst –while leaving employees twisting
in the wind. Now, all over America, executives who run their companies
into the ground are getting gold-plated exit packages while their
workers get pink slips.

Under socialism for the rich, you can screw up big time and still reap big rewards. Equifax’s Richard Smith retired in 2017 with an $18 million pension in the wake of a security breach that exposed the personal information of 145 million customers to hackers.

Wells Fargo’s Carrie Tolstedt departed with a $125 million exit package after being in charge of the unit that opened more than 2 million unauthorized customer accounts.

Whatever
happened to the idea of a meritocracy  – an economic system that allows
everyone to get ahead through hard work, and economic gains go only to
those who deserve them?  

Around 60 percent of America’s wealth is now inherited.
Many of today’s super-rich have never done a day’s work in their lives.
Trump’s response has been to expand this divide by cutting the estate
tax to apply only to estates valued at over $22 million per couple. Mitch McConnell is now proposing that the estate tax be repealed altogether.

To
the conservative mind, the specter of socialism conjures up a society
in which no one is held accountable, and no one has to work for what
they receive. Yet, that’s exactly the society Trump and the Republicans
are promoting for the rich.

Meanwhile, most Americans are subject to an increasingly harsh and arbitrary capitalism.

They need stronger safety nets, and they deserve a bigger piece of the economic pie.

If you want to call this socialism, fine. I call it fair.

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites): Eurasia Review: New York Times Covers ‘Unplanned’ – OpEd

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In the April 9 edition of the New York Times, there is a news story about the pro-life movie “Unplanned.” Of course, the term “pro-life” never appears—such persons are described as “being against abortion rights.” The words are chosen carefully: those who defend human rights in utero are against human rights.

The story starts with an observation about suburban theater-goers who saw the film last week. “A few—a gaggle of nuns in their habits, at least one collared priest—wore their dispositions on their sleeves. Others communicated in muted gestures, dabbed at tears, or lingered for long stretches in the popcorn-strewn vestibule at the AMC multiplex here, as if still processing the deliberately provocative movie they had just seen.”

The Cambridge English Dictionary defines “gaggle” as “a group of geese” or “a group of noisy or silly people.” We can assume that the reporter, Reggie Ugwu, was not referring to the nuns as “a group of geese.” That would make them “a group of noisy or silly people.”

The silly nuns were in habit. That makes sense given that pro-abortion nuns—I have met more than a few of them—tend to dress like social workers. The priest with a collar (note: even liberal priests wear a collar when they go on TV) was, like the silly nuns, making a statement with his garb, clearly wearing his “dispositions on his sleeve.”

It is true that when people witness a movie about the wanton destruction of babies they tend to well up. Either that or they are sociopaths. And yes, there is much to process about a movie that is “deliberately provocative.” Films that honestly depict bodily invasions tend to be that way.

“Unplanned,” as many know, has been subject to considerable Hollywood censorship. Ugwu accurately recounts how requests for songs to be used in the movie were denied, as were most TV interviews. The film was slapped with an “R” rating, a deliberate act, and the movie’s Twitter account was temporarily disabled. When it comes to explaining why these things happened, Ugwu wears his dispositions on his sleeve.

“Of course, no film is entitled to media exposure.” That’s true. The same could be said about the failure of the New York Times to review the movie—like virtually every other major newspaper in the nation (the Washington Post being the lone exception)—but that doesn’t empty the discussion. Why the blackout?

Ugwu anticipates this question and has a ready answer. He opines that “the belief among anti-abortion communities that powerful forces have arrayed against the film has kindled long-smoldering claims of liberal and anti-religious bias in the media and Silicon Valley.”

That Hollywood and the Silicon Valley are liberal and anti-religious is about as controversial as saying the Bible Belt is conservative and religious. Only liars or the ignorant would deny it. They are also intolerant and censorial.

Ugwu notes in a parenthetical remark that Planned Parenthood released a statement saying the movie “promotes many falsehoods.” I checked the full statement, which is three sentences long, and it does not provide a single example of a falsehood. Surely they could cite one.

In the movie, there is an ultrasound picture of the baby flinching when pierced by the abortionist. This scene has upset a lot of people: some are upset at the violence and others are upset because their argument implodes.

Ugwu says that this scene “shows a fetus with a discernible head, torso and limbs frantically squirming away from a doctor’s probe…before being liquefied by suction.” So there is a body other than that of the mother’s. And it moves. Temporarily that is.

He asked a doctor at the “nonpartisan American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists” about this scene and she said that the notion that the baby is “fighting for its life” is misleading; babies at 13 weeks cannot feel pain, she said.

There are two problems here. First of all, there is nothing “nonpartisan” about this woman—she performs abortions. Second, according to a study published in 2013 in the Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine, “As early as 8 weeks the baby exhibits reflex movement during invasive procedures.”

So the question I have for Mr. Ugwu and his “nonpartisan” abortionist friend is, “If the baby cannot feel pain, why does he or she recoil when pierced?” Don’t adults recoil when pierced by a dentist?

I could not help but notice that in the same edition of the newspaper there is an article about a change of leadership at The Nation magazine. It noted that the far-left publication was founded by abolitionists in 1865. What it didn’t mention is that it strongly defended, and lied about, the mass murders committed by Stalin and Mao. If a magazine defended, and lied about, Hitler, it would surely be noted.

Abortion and communism have much in common: both are stories about the killing of innocents. And in both stories, the paper covered them up. This is what makes the New York Times tick.

Contact Meeta Agrawal, arts and leisure editor: meeta.agrawal@nytimes.com

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Tammy Bruce: Entire admissions system needs to be evaluated

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Independent Women’s Voice president Tammy Bruce told “Tucker Carlson Tonight” Tuesday that the “entire” admissions process system must be reevaluated on the heels of new charges given in the college admissions scandal.

FOX News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence: Barr forms team to probe FBI actions in Russia investigation: report

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April 09, 2019

Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence: Barr forms team to probe FBI actions in Russia investigation: report
“fbi surveillance” – Google News: Fake ‘mobsters’ admit trying to shake down former Brooklyn pizzeria owner for nearly $200K – NBCNews.com
“fbi aclu report” – Google News: Homeland Security Was Reportedly Worried BLM Protestors Would Join ISIS – Blavity
“fbi criticism” – Google News: Federal Audit: Secret Surveillance Program Helped DEA Seize Over $50 Million In Cash And Real Estate – Forbes

Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence: Barr forms team to probe FBI actions in Russia investigation: report

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Bloomberg reported Tuesday evening that Barr has assembled a team to review certain counterintelligence decisions made by Justice Department … Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence
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“fbi surveillance” – Google News: Fake ‘mobsters’ admit trying to shake down former Brooklyn pizzeria owner for nearly $200K – NBCNews.com

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Fake ‘mobsters’ admit trying to shake down former Brooklyn pizzeria owner for nearly $200K NBCNews.comThree people pleaded guilty Tuesday to an extortion plot in an attempt to gain nearly $200000 from a former Brooklyn pizzeria owner last year.
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“fbi aclu report” – Google News: Homeland Security Was Reportedly Worried BLM Protestors Would Join ISIS – Blavity

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Homeland Security Was Reportedly Worried BLM Protestors Would Join ISIS BlavityDocuments obtained by Property of the People (POTP), a self-described nonprofit specialist organization, allegedly show law enforcement officials linked the …
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“fbi criticism” – Google News: Federal Audit: Secret Surveillance Program Helped DEA Seize Over $50 Million In Cash And Real Estate – Forbes

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Federal Audit: Secret Surveillance Program Helped DEA Seize Over $50 Million In Cash And Real Estate ForbesUnder a sweeping surveillance program, the Drug Enforcement Administration secretly spied on Americans who bought money counters, “the vast majority” of …
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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Power pole impales SUV in Washington state on video, 2 in vehicle survive

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Dramatic footage showed the moment a power pole pierced an SUV over the weekend in Washington state — but the couple inside survived the harrowing incident.

FOX News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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