Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): “Nato Russia” – Google News: Letters to the Editor: US involvement in NATO still needed – Charleston Post Courier

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Letters to the Editor: US involvement in NATO still needed  Charleston Post Courier

NATO? No longer necessary? It’s interesting at this time when Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump have advocated for the U.S. to leave NATO that The Post and …

“Nato Russia” – Google News

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): “Nato Russia” – Google News: Letters to the Editor: US involvement in NATO still needed – Charleston Post Courier

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Letters to the Editor: US involvement in NATO still needed  Charleston Post Courier

NATO? No longer necessary? It’s interesting at this time when Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump have advocated for the U.S. to leave NATO that The Post and …

“Nato Russia” – Google News

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: The Second Return Of Marco Polo To Italy – OpEd

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On March 23 President Xi and Premier Giuseppe Conte signed a memorandum that sealed the entry into Italy, in the heart of Western Europe, to the mega geostrategic project of the New Silk Road / OBOR (One Belt /One Road) proposed and promoted by Beijing.

The Strategic move that promises to revive the age of apogee of the exchanges between Asia, Europe and even Africa, patterns happened around seven centuries ago. It is considered the Chinese Marshall Plan for the 21st century, but the characteristics of the context in which it was launched, the volume of capital involved and its ambitious scope make them incomparable. For centuries, the different paths of the ancient Silk Road connected the three continents. Asia was the most important geopolitical scenario in the world, and China was its main actor, the Chinese felt it, the name of their nation “Zhongguo” (central kingdom) reflects it.

History never repeats itself the same, but sometimes it rhymes. In Beijing the use of the past, the memory of that golden age, can serve as a guide to project the future:

A little more than seven centuries have passed since the Venetian Marco Polo began his trip to the China of Kublai Khan and was surprised by its wonders, at that time India and China far exceeded in wealth, population, power and technology to any European state. The Chinese emperor belonged to the Yuan dynasty, of Mongol origin, of the same lineage of Genghis Khan, but the invaders were assimilated by the culture of their subjects, a lesson in history, which some should had consider when they thought that China would be Westernized, other historical analogies are also curious, the map of the Mongol empire in its heyday is very similar to the map of the SCO (Shanghai Cooperation Organization), the axis of the Russian / Chinese and Eurasian cooperation.

Some of those nowadays new poles of power on the international chessboard that resurface are countries that were home to historical empires like Turkey, Iran, India, China and Russia, as heirs of that legacy, reminds us of the power of history to trace the present and the future .

There will always be the question, in the form of Uchronia, to think that it would had happened with a more consolidated China in the long term, as the main Asian power and then worldwide in the past, with even greater power and influence than it had.

During the Peak of Power of the Ming Dynasty in the fifteenth century, Admiral Zeng undertook his expeditions to Africa and the Pacific and Indian Ocean, with the most imposing fleet in the world at the time.
Then for various reasons, sometimes external, such as failed military expeditions (such as that of Japan, under Kublai Khan) the constant threat of invasions, other internal issues, such as the tendency towards isolation, stopped China’s advance towards new frontiers and horizons. Then the power vacuum was filled by the Europeans. In the following centuries they created an Atlantic world order.

Finally the industrial revolution would leave Asia relegated, which would make it another chessboard where the European powers disputed their interests. Decades of humiliation came; China would suffer the Opium Wars. But in the 21st century we are witnessing a true rebirth and resurgence of Asia.

Today new winds are blowing in the world…

The triumph in the elections of Donald Trump in 2016 marked the breakdown of an international order; one of the aspects of this new paradigm was the strict definition of China as a strategic competitor of the USA. But the Chinese have prepared themselves for that, and they feel that this is their time now. Different actions allow us to conclude that the diplomacy of “low profile and waiting for the moment” has ended. In some areas, they already surpass the USA.

On a map with tectonic plates that are rearranged, with a US that seeks to reconfigure and make revisionism of the same international order that the same forge, and a European Union in a “geopolitical limbo” without a unified external strategy, without defining whether it will be a player or a chessboard. In this context, opportunities arise, a geopolitical market for a large number of countries that seek new forms of association and other types of patterns in international relations, as well as new margins arise for China to take advantage of the momentum to consolidate its superpower category.

The symbolic weight of the Chinese project’s access to Western Europe via Italy can´t be ignored either. The Italian maritime republics played a key role in connecting the Europeans with the Far East and China, and today Italy could be the beachhead in Western Europe of the OBOR project.

It has been more than seven centuries since Marco Polo’s trips to China, but now the heirs of Kublai Khan are the ones who have arrived in Europe.

*Juan Martin González Cabañas is a researcher and analyst at Dossier Geopolitico, an Argentina-based think-tank offering a South American perspective on global issues.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: India: The Need To Engage With Iran, Afghanistan And Central Asian Countries Collectively – Analysis

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By Niranjan Marjani*

On December 24, 2018 India took over the operations of the Shahid Beheshti Port in Chabahar, Iran. The development of this port is considered as an important step for India towards increasing its economic and strategic outreach in the region. Through the Chabahar Port project, India is developing a transit corridor that would provide it with access to Afghanistan and the Central Asian region.

For optimal results, however, the current nature of
India’s bilateral engagements with Iran, Afghanistan and the Central Asian countries
would require significant recalibration in order to engage with the three
entities in a collective manner.

Core Factors Defining India’s Engagement

Historical, civilisational and cultural ties are common threads in India’s engagements with Iran, Afghanistan and the Central Asian region. These factors have dominated India’s contacts with these three entities since the establishment of diplomatic ties with each. However, while historical ties are a common thread, this has not resulted in India formulating policies aimed at collective engagement with the three entities in the related spheres. Nor has this soft power connection resulted in developing collective relations in the strategic sphere. On the regional level, India’s interactions with the three have, at times, been influenced by attempts at balancing New Delhi’s relations with the regions and New Delhi’s relations with other powers.

Apart
from cultural ties, India’s relations with these three entities are characterised
by a few specific separate considerations. Iran is one of India’s largest sources
of energy imports. India is the second largest buyer of Iran’s oil after China. Oil trade between India and Iran
has become a dominant feature after India adopted liberal economic policies and
India’s demand for oil increased to supplement a growing economy.

On Afghanistan,
both New Delhi and Kabul enjoyed close relations until the Afghan civil war and
the Taliban rule. During the Taliban rule, relations between India and
Afghanistan underwent a tumultuous phase. However, in the post-Taliban period,
India-Afghanistan relations have been defined by India’s developmental
assistance in Afghanistan.

Meanwhile,
India’s relations with the individual Central Asian countries are fairly young
given how the countries in the region came into existence only in 1991. For the most part, trade has been a common driving
factor in India’s engagement with all five countries, though over the past few
years, India has gradually also begun to participate in joint military
exercises. Additionally, Tajikistan has been hosting Indian Air Force and Border
Roads Organisation personnel at its Ayni air base. Overall, at present, India’s
relations with Central Asian countries could be considered as being in a
developing phase.

Impediments to India’s Strategy

While India enjoys cordial relations with Iran, Afghanistan and Central Asian countries, the lack of a coherent overarching strategy linking the individual bilateral relationships has resulted in India’s limited interaction with the abovementioned countries in a collective manner. A general impediment has been that more focus has been placed on soft power than hard power projection. There are three key elements that could be identified as impediments resulting in India’s lack of a uniform policy for collective engagement with Iran, Afghanistan and Central Asian countries. These three factors are: power play in the region, India’s limited manoeuvring in the maritime domain, and connectivity.

All the entities
have been subject to intense power play between regional and extra-regional
powers such as Russia, China and the US. India has largely remained outside the
competition for strategic space in the region, and this has resulted in New
Delhi being unable to gain a strategic footprint in the region.

India’s
relative neglect of the maritime domain is another factor. Much like India not
gaining room for strategic manoeuvring on land in any of the three areas, the
state-of-affairs is the same in the maritime domain as well. Limited presence
in the maritime sphere and absence of a well-defined maritime security policy
has kept India away from gaining access to the regions.

India has
always cited connectivity related shortcomings as a major factor that has
prevented meaningful and deeper engagements, especially with Afghanistan and
Central Asia. Since these entities are landlocked and can be accessed by land only
through Pakistan and Pakistan-occupied territories, this adds to India’s
obstacles in collective engagement.

India’s Prevailing Strategy

India’s prevailing strategy for engagement with Iran, Afghanistan and the Central Asian countries could be considered at two levels – India’s cooperation with regional and extra regional powers having a stake in the region, and an Afghanistan-centric approach. India’s role in the region, particularly in Afghanistan, has been in cooperation with the US, and recently, with China after the Wuhan Summit. India is yet to expand its role in Afghanistan and in the entire region. On a multilateral level India, is part of the Ashgabat Agreement, the Heart of Asia Conference, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) and India-Central Asia Dialogue. The India-Central Asia Dialogue prominently highlighted Afghanistan’s political and security situation.

However, India’s present strategy has its share of
challenges. If the Afghanistan-centric approach forms the basis of India’s
engagement in the region, India does not yet have a strategy to handle the
security situation in Afghanistan. By developing the Chabahar Port, India is
trying to overcome its limited presence in the maritime connectivity domain. However,
until such time New Delhi defines its role in Afghanistan, the Chabahar Port
would yield limited advantage.

India has proposed a multilateral order in the
Indo-Pacific as a counter balance to China. New Delhi could consider a similar arrangement but aimed at collective
engagement with Iran, Afghanistan and the Central Asian countries. An
alternative arrangement would enable India to engage collectively with the
three focus areas and thereby optimise the actualisation of India’s policy
objectives vis-a-vis each individual relationship.

*Niranjan Marjani is an Independent Researcher based in Vadodara, India.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Link Between Gum Disease And Alzheimer’s Confirmed

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Researchers are reporting new findings on how bacteria involved in gum disease can travel throughout the body, exuding toxins connected with Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and aspiration pneumonia. They detected evidence of the bacteria in brain samples from people with Alzheimer’s and used mice to show that the bacterium can find its way from the mouth to the brain, Medical Xpress reports.

The bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is the bad
actor involved in periodontitis, the most serious form of gum disease.
These new findings underscore the importance of good dental hygiene as
scientists seek ways to better control this common bacterial infection.

“Oral hygiene is very important throughout our life, not only for
having a beautiful smile but also to decrease the risk of many serious
diseases,” said Jan Potempa, Ph.D., DSc, a professor at the University
of Louisville School of Dentistry and head of the department of
microbiology at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. “People with
genetic risk factors that make them susceptible to rheumatoid arthritis
or Alzheimer’s disease should be extremely concerned with preventing gum
disease.”

While previous researchers have noted the presence of
P. gingivalis in brain samples from Alzheimer’s patients, Potempa’s
team, in collaboration with Cortexyme, Inc., offers the strongest
evidence to date that the bacterium may actually contribute to the
development of Alzheimer’s disease. Potempa will present the research at
the American Association of Anatomists annual meeting during the 2019
Experimental Biology meeting, held April 6-9 in Orlando, Fla.

The researchers compared brain samples from deceased people with and
without Alzheimer’s disease who were roughly the same age when they
died. They found P. gingivalis was more common in samples from
Alzheimer’s patients, evidenced by the bacterium’s DNA fingerprint and
the presence of its key toxins, known as gingipains.

In studies
using mice, they showed P. gingivalis can move from the mouth to the
brain and that this migration can be blocked by chemicals that interact
with gingipains. An experimental drug that blocks gingipains, known as
COR388, is currently in phase 1 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease.
Cortexyme, Inc. and Potempa’s team are working on other compounds that
block enzymes important to P. gingivalis and other gum bacteria in hopes
of interrupting their role in advancing Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

The researchers also report evidence on the bacterium’s role in the
autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis, as well as aspiration
pneumonia, a lung infection caused by inhaling food or saliva.

“P. gingivalis’s main toxins, the enzymes the bacterium need to exert
its devilish tasks, are good targets for potential new medical
interventions to counteract a variety of diseases,” said Potempa. “The
beauty of such approaches in comparison to antibiotics is that such
interventions are aimed only at key pathogens, leaving alone good,
commensal bacteria, which we need.”

P. gingivalis commonly
begins to infiltrate the gums during the teenage years. About one in
five people under age 30 have low levels of the bacterium in their gums.
While it is not harmful in most people, if it grows to large numbers
the bacteria provoke the body’s immune system to create inflammation,
leading to redness, swelling, bleeding and the erosion of gum tissue.

Making matters worse, P. gingivalis even causes benign bacteria in the
mouth to change their activities and further increase the immune
response. Bacteria can travel from the mouth into the bloodstream
through the simple act of chewing or brushing teeth.

The best
way to prevent P. gingivalis from growing out of control is by brushing
and flossing regularly and visiting a dental hygienist at least once a
year, Potempa said. Smokers and older people are at increased risk for
infection. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role, but they are
not well understood.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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“fbi and trump” – Google News: Judge blocks Trump policy of sending asylum seekers to Mexico – live – The Guardian

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April 08, 2019

“fbi and trump” – Google News: Judge blocks Trump policy of sending asylum seekers to Mexico – live – The Guardian
“fbi scandal” – Google News: Two years of collusion delusion – Red Bluff Daily News
“fbi surveillance” – Google News: Local men who smuggled cocaine to Fort Worth plead guilty – Monitor
“fbi surveillance” – Google News: Secret Service Agent Infects Own Computer With Mar-a-Lago Malware, and Tech Community Snickers – The Daily Beast
“Peter Strzok” – Google News: Fitton: Obama State Dept Conspiracy Against Trump? – Breitbart

“fbi and trump” – Google News: Judge blocks Trump policy of sending asylum seekers to Mexico – live – The Guardian

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Judge blocks Trump policy of sending asylum seekers to Mexico – live The GuardianDecision comes after the Department of Homeland Security said it planned to expand the program. “fbi and trump” – Google News
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Two years of collusion delusion Red Bluff Daily NewsToday is about the last day you can reserve a seat at the 2019 Red, White and Blue Republican Dinner honoring the Second Amendment, this Saturday, April 13 …
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Secret Service Agent Infects Own Computer With Mar-a-Lago Malware, and Tech Community Snickers The Daily BeastA Secret *Service* agent investigating Yujing Zhang’s visit to Mar-a-Lago infected one of the agency’s own computers with the malware carried in by the …
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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: India: Islamist Terrorism Contained, Not Terminated – Analysis

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By Ajit Kumar Singh*

On March 25, 2019, personnel
from the Bihar Ant-Terrorism Squad (ATS) arrested two terrorists,
identified as Khairul Mandal and Abu Sultan, from Patna, the State
capital. A Police statement disclosed, “Many suspicious documents
related to the Security Forces posted in Jammu after the Pulwama attack
have been recovered from the arrested. Both the men are said to be
active members of Bangladesh’s banned militant outfit
Jamiat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB) and Islamic State Bangladesh.”

On the same day, Rajasthan
Police arrested a 42-year-old man, identified as Mohammed Parvez, from
Delhi, for allegedly spying for Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence
(ISI). During questioning Pervez revealed that he was in contact with
ISI handlers and had travelled to Pakistan 17 times in the last 18
years.

On February 21, 2019, two Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM)
terrorists, identified as Shahnawaz Teli and Aqib Ahmad Malik, were
arrested from Deoband in the Saharanpur District of Uttar Pradesh (UP).

According to partial data compiled by the South Asia Terrorism Portal
(STAP), at least 2,688 persons have been arrested since 26/11 attacks
(Mumbai 2008) in connection with Islamist extremism and terrorism,
including terrorist cadres, Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI)
agents, and Bangladeshi, Nepali and Pakistani nationals (data till April
7, 2019). 312 of these arrests were made in 2018 as against 249 in
2107. 91 of these arrests were made in 2019 (data till April 7, 2019).

As in past,
arrests made by the Security Forces (SFs) across the country in 2018
resulted in the neutralisation of several terror sleeper cells. Most prominently,
in an early morning action on December 26, 2018, the National
Investigation Agency (NIA) carried out searches at 17 locations in Delhi
and Uttar Pradesh in a major crackdown on an Islamic State (aka Daesh)-inspired
module styled as Harkat-ul-Harb-e-Islam (Movement the War of Islam),
with active support from Delhi Police and UP Police/UP Anti-Terrorism
Squad (ATS). At least 10 cadres of the outfit were arrested and the
Daesh-cell was neutralised.

Most recently, the SFs identified and neutralised a terrorist module purportedly ‘inspired’ by Daesh
when they arrested nine members of the self-styled Ummat-e-Mohammadiya
(Community of Mohammad) from Thane and Aurangabad in Maharashtra on
January 21-22, 2019.

Specifically, according to the
SATP database, a total of 167 Daesh sympathizers/recruits have been
arrested and another 73 persons have been detained, counselled and
released, in India (data till April 7, 2019). Another 98 Indians were
believed to have travelled to Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan to join IS –
microscopic numbers in terms of the country’s huge Muslim population. Of
the 98 who travelled abroad to join Daesh, 33 are confirmed to have
been killed.

Moreover, the pressure on the Students Islamic Movement of India (SIMI)/Indian Mujahedeen (IM), which suffered major losses in 2008  and thereafter continued
through the year. According to SATP data, since March 11, 2000, at
least 716 SIMI/IM cadres have been arrested in 135 incidents (data till
April 7, 2019). Six of these arrests were in 2018.

Due to these operational successes, Pakistan-backed Islamist terror formations, as well as Daesh
and Al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent (AQIS), the last two of which
have been attempting to make inroads since 2014, have failed
comprehensively in their ambitions. There was just one Islamist
terrorist attack in India, outside Jammu and Kashmir (J&K), through
2018. On September 14, 2018, a policeman sustained a minor injury in a
blast at the Maqsudan Police Station in Jalandhar city, Punjab. The NIA
is currently investigating the case. In 2017 as well, a single Islamist terror attack was recorded: nine persons were injured in a blast
in a train near Jabdi Railway Station in Shajapur District of Madhya
Pradesh on March 7, 2017. The next day, a terrorist involved in the
blast was killed by SFs in Lucknow, UP. It is useful to recall that, in
2008, Islamist terror formations operating out of Pakistan had carried
out 10 terrorist attacks in India, outside J&K, resulting in 352
fatalities.  the largest number recorded in a year since 2000. These
attacks resulted in the death of 352 persons (310 civilians, 30 SF
personnel and 12 terrorists). This was the largest number of attacks and
fatalities in a single year since 2000. The last major attack
(resulting in three or more fatalities) by Islamist terrorists in India
outside J&K, took place on October 27, 2013, when terrorists carried
out bomb blasts in Patna, killing seven civilians. One of the attackers
was also killed. 

Cooperation from
friendly countries has also helped India in its fight against Islamist
terrorism. In total, at least 71 fugitives have been extradited by
foreign governments to India since February 20, 2002, till date,
according to the Ministry of External Affairs Website, including 21 from
UAE, nine from USA; six from Canada; four from Thailand; three each
from Germany and South Africa, two each from Australia, Bangladesh,
Belgium, Indonesia, Mauritius, Portugal and Singapore; and one each from
Bahrain, Bulgaria, Hong Kong,  Morocco, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Peru,
Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, and UK. At least 19 of these 71 fugitives were
extradited for offenses related to terrorism (mostly attacks outside
J&K), while the remaining 52 were extradited for other criminal
offenses, including 15 for murder.

Further, Governments at the
Centre and in the States have taken certain measures to deal effectively
with Islamist terror. Significantly, while replying to a
question,“whether any effective steps have been taken by the Government
to check the increasing terrorist activities” the Government informed
the Parliament on February 12, 2019, that it has taken various measures
to counter the menace of terrorism, prominently including
“establishment of observation posts, border fencing, flood lighting,
deployment of modern and hi-tech surveillance equipment; upgradation of
Intelligence setup; strengthening the coastal security.”

Nevertheless, several worries remain.

The Union Ministry of Home
Affairs (UMHA) in a January 31, 2019, notification, disclosed that the
government had decided to continue its ban on SIMI for another five
years for its “subversive activities”. UMHA noted,

[SIMI] has been indulging in activities which are prejudicial to the security of the country and have the potential of disturbing the peace and communal harmony and disrupting the secular fabric of the country.

It is useful to recall that the
SIMI/IM complex was mobilized by Islamabad in the early 2000s due to
increasing international pressure on Pakistan in the aftermath of the
9/11 terrorist attacks in the US. Not surprisingly, a large proportion
of major terrorist attacks in India’s hinterland, thereafter, had the
signature of the SIMI/IM complex, allied to various Pakistan-based
terrorist formations.

However, though Daesh has
failed to inflict significant harm so far, given intermittent incidents
of ‘lone wolf attacks’ by IS-inspired individuals across the globe, it
remains a threat. The increasing trend of fringe Islamist terror
formations in several countries getting associated with the IS is a
source of concern for India as well. Significantly, on February 12,
2019, the Jharkhand Government banned the Popular Front of India (PFI)
for its suspected links with Islamic State. A Government statement
noted,

The state has banned the Popular Front of India, which is active in Jharkhand, under the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1908. The Home Department had recommended the ban. The PFI is very active in Pakur District. The members of the PFI, which was set up in Kerala, are influenced by the IS. According to Home Department report, some PFI members have even gone to Syria from southern states and are working for the IS.

Clearly, though SFs have manged to keep Islamist terrorism in India in check for a long time now, complacence of any kind would be unwarranted. Regrettably, as the SAIR has noted repeatedly in the past, little has been done to augment the capacities of the security establishment engaged in fighting terrorism across the country.

*Ajit Kumar Singh
Research Fellow, Institute for Conflict Management

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites): Eurasia Review: India: Islamist Terrorism Contained, Not Terminated – Analysis

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By Ajit Kumar Singh*

On March 25, 2019, personnel
from the Bihar Ant-Terrorism Squad (ATS) arrested two terrorists,
identified as Khairul Mandal and Abu Sultan, from Patna, the State
capital. A Police statement disclosed, “Many suspicious documents
related to the Security Forces posted in Jammu after the Pulwama attack
have been recovered from the arrested. Both the men are said to be
active members of Bangladesh’s banned militant outfit
Jamiat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB) and Islamic State Bangladesh.”

On the same day, Rajasthan
Police arrested a 42-year-old man, identified as Mohammed Parvez, from
Delhi, for allegedly spying for Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence
(ISI). During questioning Pervez revealed that he was in contact with
ISI handlers and had travelled to Pakistan 17 times in the last 18
years.

On February 21, 2019, two Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM)
terrorists, identified as Shahnawaz Teli and Aqib Ahmad Malik, were
arrested from Deoband in the Saharanpur District of Uttar Pradesh (UP).

According to partial data compiled by the South Asia Terrorism Portal
(STAP), at least 2,688 persons have been arrested since 26/11 attacks
(Mumbai 2008) in connection with Islamist extremism and terrorism,
including terrorist cadres, Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI)
agents, and Bangladeshi, Nepali and Pakistani nationals (data till April
7, 2019). 312 of these arrests were made in 2018 as against 249 in
2107. 91 of these arrests were made in 2019 (data till April 7, 2019).

As in past,
arrests made by the Security Forces (SFs) across the country in 2018
resulted in the neutralisation of several terror sleeper cells. Most prominently,
in an early morning action on December 26, 2018, the National
Investigation Agency (NIA) carried out searches at 17 locations in Delhi
and Uttar Pradesh in a major crackdown on an Islamic State (aka Daesh)-inspired
module styled as Harkat-ul-Harb-e-Islam (Movement the War of Islam),
with active support from Delhi Police and UP Police/UP Anti-Terrorism
Squad (ATS). At least 10 cadres of the outfit were arrested and the
Daesh-cell was neutralised.

Most recently, the SFs identified and neutralised a terrorist module purportedly ‘inspired’ by Daesh
when they arrested nine members of the self-styled Ummat-e-Mohammadiya
(Community of Mohammad) from Thane and Aurangabad in Maharashtra on
January 21-22, 2019.

Specifically, according to the
SATP database, a total of 167 Daesh sympathizers/recruits have been
arrested and another 73 persons have been detained, counselled and
released, in India (data till April 7, 2019). Another 98 Indians were
believed to have travelled to Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan to join IS –
microscopic numbers in terms of the country’s huge Muslim population. Of
the 98 who travelled abroad to join Daesh, 33 are confirmed to have
been killed.

Moreover, the pressure on the Students Islamic Movement of India (SIMI)/Indian Mujahedeen (IM), which suffered major losses in 2008  and thereafter continued
through the year. According to SATP data, since March 11, 2000, at
least 716 SIMI/IM cadres have been arrested in 135 incidents (data till
April 7, 2019). Six of these arrests were in 2018.

Due to these operational successes, Pakistan-backed Islamist terror formations, as well as Daesh
and Al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent (AQIS), the last two of which
have been attempting to make inroads since 2014, have failed
comprehensively in their ambitions. There was just one Islamist
terrorist attack in India, outside Jammu and Kashmir (J&K), through
2018. On September 14, 2018, a policeman sustained a minor injury in a
blast at the Maqsudan Police Station in Jalandhar city, Punjab. The NIA
is currently investigating the case. In 2017 as well, a single Islamist terror attack was recorded: nine persons were injured in a blast
in a train near Jabdi Railway Station in Shajapur District of Madhya
Pradesh on March 7, 2017. The next day, a terrorist involved in the
blast was killed by SFs in Lucknow, UP. It is useful to recall that, in
2008, Islamist terror formations operating out of Pakistan had carried
out 10 terrorist attacks in India, outside J&K, resulting in 352
fatalities.  the largest number recorded in a year since 2000. These
attacks resulted in the death of 352 persons (310 civilians, 30 SF
personnel and 12 terrorists). This was the largest number of attacks and
fatalities in a single year since 2000. The last major attack
(resulting in three or more fatalities) by Islamist terrorists in India
outside J&K, took place on October 27, 2013, when terrorists carried
out bomb blasts in Patna, killing seven civilians. One of the attackers
was also killed. 

Cooperation from
friendly countries has also helped India in its fight against Islamist
terrorism. In total, at least 71 fugitives have been extradited by
foreign governments to India since February 20, 2002, till date,
according to the Ministry of External Affairs Website, including 21 from
UAE, nine from USA; six from Canada; four from Thailand; three each
from Germany and South Africa, two each from Australia, Bangladesh,
Belgium, Indonesia, Mauritius, Portugal and Singapore; and one each from
Bahrain, Bulgaria, Hong Kong,  Morocco, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Peru,
Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, and UK. At least 19 of these 71 fugitives were
extradited for offenses related to terrorism (mostly attacks outside
J&K), while the remaining 52 were extradited for other criminal
offenses, including 15 for murder.

Further, Governments at the
Centre and in the States have taken certain measures to deal effectively
with Islamist terror. Significantly, while replying to a
question,“whether any effective steps have been taken by the Government
to check the increasing terrorist activities” the Government informed
the Parliament on February 12, 2019, that it has taken various measures
to counter the menace of terrorism, prominently including
“establishment of observation posts, border fencing, flood lighting,
deployment of modern and hi-tech surveillance equipment; upgradation of
Intelligence setup; strengthening the coastal security.”

Nevertheless, several worries remain.

The Union Ministry of Home
Affairs (UMHA) in a January 31, 2019, notification, disclosed that the
government had decided to continue its ban on SIMI for another five
years for its “subversive activities”. UMHA noted,

[SIMI] has been indulging in activities which are prejudicial to the security of the country and have the potential of disturbing the peace and communal harmony and disrupting the secular fabric of the country.

It is useful to recall that the
SIMI/IM complex was mobilized by Islamabad in the early 2000s due to
increasing international pressure on Pakistan in the aftermath of the
9/11 terrorist attacks in the US. Not surprisingly, a large proportion
of major terrorist attacks in India’s hinterland, thereafter, had the
signature of the SIMI/IM complex, allied to various Pakistan-based
terrorist formations.

However, though Daesh has
failed to inflict significant harm so far, given intermittent incidents
of ‘lone wolf attacks’ by IS-inspired individuals across the globe, it
remains a threat. The increasing trend of fringe Islamist terror
formations in several countries getting associated with the IS is a
source of concern for India as well. Significantly, on February 12,
2019, the Jharkhand Government banned the Popular Front of India (PFI)
for its suspected links with Islamic State. A Government statement
noted,

The state has banned the Popular Front of India, which is active in Jharkhand, under the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1908. The Home Department had recommended the ban. The PFI is very active in Pakur District. The members of the PFI, which was set up in Kerala, are influenced by the IS. According to Home Department report, some PFI members have even gone to Syria from southern states and are working for the IS.

Clearly, though SFs have manged to keep Islamist terrorism in India in check for a long time now, complacence of any kind would be unwarranted. Regrettably, as the SAIR has noted repeatedly in the past, little has been done to augment the capacities of the security establishment engaged in fighting terrorism across the country.

*Ajit Kumar Singh
Research Fellow, Institute for Conflict Management

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites)


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The Global Security Review from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites): Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: India: Islamist Terrorism Contained, Not Terminated – Analysis

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By Ajit Kumar Singh*

On March 25, 2019, personnel
from the Bihar Ant-Terrorism Squad (ATS) arrested two terrorists,
identified as Khairul Mandal and Abu Sultan, from Patna, the State
capital. A Police statement disclosed, “Many suspicious documents
related to the Security Forces posted in Jammu after the Pulwama attack
have been recovered from the arrested. Both the men are said to be
active members of Bangladesh’s banned militant outfit
Jamiat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB) and Islamic State Bangladesh.”

On the same day, Rajasthan
Police arrested a 42-year-old man, identified as Mohammed Parvez, from
Delhi, for allegedly spying for Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence
(ISI). During questioning Pervez revealed that he was in contact with
ISI handlers and had travelled to Pakistan 17 times in the last 18
years.

On February 21, 2019, two Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM)
terrorists, identified as Shahnawaz Teli and Aqib Ahmad Malik, were
arrested from Deoband in the Saharanpur District of Uttar Pradesh (UP).

According to partial data compiled by the South Asia Terrorism Portal
(STAP), at least 2,688 persons have been arrested since 26/11 attacks
(Mumbai 2008) in connection with Islamist extremism and terrorism,
including terrorist cadres, Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI)
agents, and Bangladeshi, Nepali and Pakistani nationals (data till April
7, 2019). 312 of these arrests were made in 2018 as against 249 in
2107. 91 of these arrests were made in 2019 (data till April 7, 2019).

As in past,
arrests made by the Security Forces (SFs) across the country in 2018
resulted in the neutralisation of several terror sleeper cells. Most prominently,
in an early morning action on December 26, 2018, the National
Investigation Agency (NIA) carried out searches at 17 locations in Delhi
and Uttar Pradesh in a major crackdown on an Islamic State (aka Daesh)-inspired
module styled as Harkat-ul-Harb-e-Islam (Movement the War of Islam),
with active support from Delhi Police and UP Police/UP Anti-Terrorism
Squad (ATS). At least 10 cadres of the outfit were arrested and the
Daesh-cell was neutralised.

Most recently, the SFs identified and neutralised a terrorist module purportedly ‘inspired’ by Daesh
when they arrested nine members of the self-styled Ummat-e-Mohammadiya
(Community of Mohammad) from Thane and Aurangabad in Maharashtra on
January 21-22, 2019.

Specifically, according to the
SATP database, a total of 167 Daesh sympathizers/recruits have been
arrested and another 73 persons have been detained, counselled and
released, in India (data till April 7, 2019). Another 98 Indians were
believed to have travelled to Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan to join IS –
microscopic numbers in terms of the country’s huge Muslim population. Of
the 98 who travelled abroad to join Daesh, 33 are confirmed to have
been killed.

Moreover, the pressure on the Students Islamic Movement of India (SIMI)/Indian Mujahedeen (IM), which suffered major losses in 2008  and thereafter continued
through the year. According to SATP data, since March 11, 2000, at
least 716 SIMI/IM cadres have been arrested in 135 incidents (data till
April 7, 2019). Six of these arrests were in 2018.

Due to these operational successes, Pakistan-backed Islamist terror formations, as well as Daesh
and Al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent (AQIS), the last two of which
have been attempting to make inroads since 2014, have failed
comprehensively in their ambitions. There was just one Islamist
terrorist attack in India, outside Jammu and Kashmir (J&K), through
2018. On September 14, 2018, a policeman sustained a minor injury in a
blast at the Maqsudan Police Station in Jalandhar city, Punjab. The NIA
is currently investigating the case. In 2017 as well, a single Islamist terror attack was recorded: nine persons were injured in a blast
in a train near Jabdi Railway Station in Shajapur District of Madhya
Pradesh on March 7, 2017. The next day, a terrorist involved in the
blast was killed by SFs in Lucknow, UP. It is useful to recall that, in
2008, Islamist terror formations operating out of Pakistan had carried
out 10 terrorist attacks in India, outside J&K, resulting in 352
fatalities.  the largest number recorded in a year since 2000. These
attacks resulted in the death of 352 persons (310 civilians, 30 SF
personnel and 12 terrorists). This was the largest number of attacks and
fatalities in a single year since 2000. The last major attack
(resulting in three or more fatalities) by Islamist terrorists in India
outside J&K, took place on October 27, 2013, when terrorists carried
out bomb blasts in Patna, killing seven civilians. One of the attackers
was also killed. 

Cooperation from
friendly countries has also helped India in its fight against Islamist
terrorism. In total, at least 71 fugitives have been extradited by
foreign governments to India since February 20, 2002, till date,
according to the Ministry of External Affairs Website, including 21 from
UAE, nine from USA; six from Canada; four from Thailand; three each
from Germany and South Africa, two each from Australia, Bangladesh,
Belgium, Indonesia, Mauritius, Portugal and Singapore; and one each from
Bahrain, Bulgaria, Hong Kong,  Morocco, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Peru,
Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, and UK. At least 19 of these 71 fugitives were
extradited for offenses related to terrorism (mostly attacks outside
J&K), while the remaining 52 were extradited for other criminal
offenses, including 15 for murder.

Further, Governments at the
Centre and in the States have taken certain measures to deal effectively
with Islamist terror. Significantly, while replying to a
question,“whether any effective steps have been taken by the Government
to check the increasing terrorist activities” the Government informed
the Parliament on February 12, 2019, that it has taken various measures
to counter the menace of terrorism, prominently including
“establishment of observation posts, border fencing, flood lighting,
deployment of modern and hi-tech surveillance equipment; upgradation of
Intelligence setup; strengthening the coastal security.”

Nevertheless, several worries remain.

The Union Ministry of Home
Affairs (UMHA) in a January 31, 2019, notification, disclosed that the
government had decided to continue its ban on SIMI for another five
years for its “subversive activities”. UMHA noted,

[SIMI] has been indulging in activities which are prejudicial to the security of the country and have the potential of disturbing the peace and communal harmony and disrupting the secular fabric of the country.

It is useful to recall that the
SIMI/IM complex was mobilized by Islamabad in the early 2000s due to
increasing international pressure on Pakistan in the aftermath of the
9/11 terrorist attacks in the US. Not surprisingly, a large proportion
of major terrorist attacks in India’s hinterland, thereafter, had the
signature of the SIMI/IM complex, allied to various Pakistan-based
terrorist formations.

However, though Daesh has
failed to inflict significant harm so far, given intermittent incidents
of ‘lone wolf attacks’ by IS-inspired individuals across the globe, it
remains a threat. The increasing trend of fringe Islamist terror
formations in several countries getting associated with the IS is a
source of concern for India as well. Significantly, on February 12,
2019, the Jharkhand Government banned the Popular Front of India (PFI)
for its suspected links with Islamic State. A Government statement
noted,

The state has banned the Popular Front of India, which is active in Jharkhand, under the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1908. The Home Department had recommended the ban. The PFI is very active in Pakur District. The members of the PFI, which was set up in Kerala, are influenced by the IS. According to Home Department report, some PFI members have even gone to Syria from southern states and are working for the IS.

Clearly, though SFs have manged to keep Islamist terrorism in India in check for a long time now, complacence of any kind would be unwarranted. Regrettably, as the SAIR has noted repeatedly in the past, little has been done to augment the capacities of the security establishment engaged in fighting terrorism across the country.

*Ajit Kumar Singh
Research Fellow, Institute for Conflict Management

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)

The Global Security Review from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites)


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