1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): “Russia Ukraine” – Google News: Ukraine-Russia Friendship Treaty expires on April 1 – Interfax-Ukraine

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Ukraine-Russia Friendship Treaty expires on April 1  Interfax-Ukraine

The Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership between Ukraine and the Russian Federation expired on April 1, 2019.

“Russia Ukraine” – Google News

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)


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Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): “house judiciary committee” – Google News: Dump Trump. Now! – Progressive.org

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Dump Trump. Now!  Progressive.org

It is time to be done with Donald Trump. Not in 2021. Not in 2020. Now.

“house judiciary committee” – Google News

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): “house judiciary committee” – Google News: Dump Trump. Now! – Progressive.org

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Dump Trump. Now!  Progressive.org

It is time to be done with Donald Trump. Not in 2021. Not in 2020. Now.

“house judiciary committee” – Google News

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Stars and Stripes: Navy vet’s family returns Japanese flag taken as trophy during WWII

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A lost Japanese World War II flag is finally home after a search sparked by the family of the Navy pilot who brought it back from the Philippines in 1945. The red and white flag was returned March 17 to relatives of Japanese sailor Hisao Matsue, who died at age 36 on the Philippine island of Luzon in 1945.

Stars and Stripes

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Stars and Stripes: Navy vet’s family returns Japanese flag taken as trophy during WWII

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A lost Japanese World War II flag is finally home after a search sparked by the family of the Navy pilot who brought it back from the Philippines in 1945. The red and white flag was returned March 17 to relatives of Japanese sailor Hisao Matsue, who died at age 36 on the Philippine island of Luzon in 1945.

Stars and Stripes

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): Voice of America: With Removal of IS, Syrians Search for Missing Loved Ones

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The final declaration of victory on the Islamic State (IS) in Syria has sparked renewed hopes for Syrians whose family members were kidnapped by IS, with thousands asking the U.S.-backed forces to disclose the whereabouts of their loved ones.

The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) last week announced the complete removal of IS from its last stronghold of Baghuz in eastern Syria and the rescue of thousands of civilians used as human shields by the jihadists. Still, according to the Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR), about 20,000 Syrians kidnapped by IS are missing.

“We have to know what happened to our loved ones,” said Ensaf Nasser, who has desperately searched for her husband since his abduction by IS in August 2014.

“The fate of my husband and thousands of detainees kidnapped by IS must be looked into now by the coalition and the SDF before evidences are lost,” she told VOA.

Local journalist

Nasser’s husband, Foad Ahmed el-Mohamed, was a local journalist taking pictures of wounded civilians at Aisha Hospital in Deir el-Zour city when IS militants broke in and took him away.

The extremists told Nasser that her husband was considered an infidel because he supported a secular and democratic state instead of a caliphate. He was also accused of breaking their strict Sunni codes by marrying Nasser, who was a follower of Syria’s Druze sect, and naming his son after the Argentinian Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara.

“When the battle to capture Raqqa started, we all had high hopes to learn something about him. During the final battle to capture Baghuz, we also hoped that we would find or learn some news as thousands were getting out. But till now we haven’t heard anything,” Nasser said, adding that the recapture of IS’s last territory ended in a crushing disappointment for her that her husband may still be alive.

The U.S.-backed battle to seize northeastern Syria from the grip of IS lasted five years. Over the years, the Islamist group lost large swaths of Syria it had once governed, including its defeat in its self-proclaimed capital, Raqqa, in October of 2017.

Earlier this month, the predominantly Kurdish SDF officially announced March 23 the defeat of the “caliphate” after weeks of fierce battles for the small town of Baghuz in far eastern Syria.

“We have freed 5 million people in Syria’s north and east from the grip of terrorism, we salvaged 52,000 square kilometers of land and removed the danger of terrorism over humanity,” the SDF said in its official victory proclamation.

​Ideology

As their mission enters the next stage, the SDF vowed to continue fighting the IS ideology and reconstruct damage caused by the war.

In the key city of Raqqa, the SDF said its focus for the post-IS period has been to bring normality back to daily life, not only by removing thousands of explosives left behind by the jihadists but also by helping Syrians find their missing family members. The group is asking families of the missing to register with the Public Relations Committee and Tribes Council in Raqqa Civil Council to investigate the fate of their loved ones.

The Syrian Network for Human Rights in a new report Thursday said that in Raqqa alone nearly 4,247 people are still missing nearly 18 months after IS’s removal.

SNHR asked for international support in disclosing the fate of the missing Syrians, especially as local officials continue to find dozens of people buried in mass graves across the region.

“The Central Tracing Agency, run by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), should begin to assist in the search for thousands of missing persons in Syria, try to identify their fate, and provide expertise and logistical support to the Syrian community and local organizations in this field, particularly in northeastern Syria, after the defeat of ISIS,” SNHR chairman Abdul Ghany said in a statement.

“It is possible that the contribution of international actors in this field can help Syrian society to determine the fate of tens of thousands of disappeared people,” he added.

Syrians who are in search of their missing family members say they are provided with little information when reaching out to officials from SDF and the U.S.-led coalition. Many hope their loved ones could be in refugee camps under the SDF control or IS prisons that were captured recently.

Amer Mattar, whose brother Mohammed-Noor Mattar has been missing in Raqqa since August 2013, said he was turned down by local officials when he requested to know about the fate of his 22-year-old brother.

“We have been waiting as prisons and detention centers are captured,” Mattar told VOA. “But we are learning that they are all going empty, and with IS-controlled territory shrinking, our questions on what happened to the missing are growing.”

​Challenges

Local officials say they are taking the plight of missing Syrians and their families seriously, but the process of identifying the victims can be challenging, especially as the SDF and the coalition try to expose IS fighters who are hiding among civilians in refugee camps. They are expecting to know more during their investigations with captured IS fighters.

“There is a large number of civilians evacuated from Baghuz, and they were all moved to al-Hol camp for security check and will be released to their families,” said Osama al-Khalaf, a spokesperson for Raqqa Civil Council, speaking of a major refugee camp in northeastern Deir el-Zour, where thousands of civilians and IS family members are kept.

“We are gathering information from witnesses to identity who has been killed among the detainees under IS,” said al-Khalaf, adding the results of their interrogations with IS fighters is kept confidential for security reasons.

According to Syrian organizations and activists, IS used to evacuate and relocate detainees from its prisons before losing an area.

They say the group kept thousands of prisoners under ground and used them as human shields to prevent coalition airstrikes.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a U.K.-based war monitor, said on Thursday the U.S.-led coalition is continuing to look for undiscovered underground tunnels and trenches in Baghuz in search of hiding IS fighters and kidnapped civilians.

Voice of America

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)


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The Global Security News: “fbi” – Google News: FBI Gears Up To Fight Cybercriminals – pymnts.com

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March 31, 2019

“fbi” – Google News: FBI Gears Up To Fight Cybercriminals – pymnts.com

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Share Tweet Share Share Share Print Email The FBI has announced a directive shift away from counterterrorism and toward fighting the increasing threats from cyber attacks, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.
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Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (8 sites): “political criminology” – Google News: The Fulcrum family tree – The Fulcrum

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Eighteen Fulcrum alumni reflect on their time at the paper As the Fulcrum approaches its 80th production cycle, thousands of our alumni are out in the world, many of them holding their time at the Fulcrum close to heart.
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“fbi” – Google News: FBI Gears Up To Fight Cybercriminals – pymnts.com

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March 31, 2019

“fbi” – Google News: FBI Gears Up To Fight Cybercriminals – pymnts.com

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Share Tweet Share Share Share Print Email The FBI has announced a directive shift away from counterterrorism and toward fighting the increasing threats from cyber attacks, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.
Read More

Crime and Criminology from Michael_Novakhov (8 sites): “political criminology” – Google News: The Fulcrum family tree – The Fulcrum

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Eighteen Fulcrum alumni reflect on their time at the paper As the Fulcrum approaches its 80th production cycle, thousands of our alumni are out in the world, many of them holding their time at the Fulcrum close to heart.
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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): World – TIME: Nationwide Blackouts Are the New Normal in Venezuela as Power Goes Out Again

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(CARACAS, Venezuela) — Another day, another blackout.

Power went out across Venezuela on Sunday, just as it did on Saturday, and the day before that.

But while some electricity had returned by Sunday afternoon, jittery Venezuelans weren’t so much celebrating the lights coming on as wondering when the next outages would flick them off.

“No one can put up with this. We spend almost all day without electricity,” said Karina Camacho, a 56-year-old housewife who was about to buy a chicken when electronic payment machines stopped working. “There’s been no water since (last) Monday, you can’t call by phone, we can’t pay with cards or even eat.”

As the latest blackout unfolded, many took to balconies and building windows to bang pots in protest and shout curses at President Nicolas Maduro, who they consider responsible for the power failures.

Others responded to a call by opposition leader Juan Guaido to demonstrate against the government, blocking roads and burning rubbish until “colectivos,” or frequently armed government supporters, appeared to arrive on motorbikes. Some of the protests occurred near the Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, in a direct challenge to Maduro.

The ongoing blackouts now mark another point of tension in a country paralyzed by political and economic turmoil, compounding a humanitarian crisis and deepening a prolonged standoff between two political parties vying for power.

Netblocks, a group monitoring internet censorship, said network data showed just 15 percent of Venezuela was online after the latest power cuts struck, while water supply, phone service and internet continued to be shaky and unreliable.

On Twitter, Guaido reiterated his claim Sunday that government neglect and corruption had had left the electrical grid in shambles after years of mismanagement.

“There is no sabotage,” the leader of the opposition-controlled National Assembly wrote. “They brought the electrical system to a collapse because they are corrupt and now they can’t resolve it because they are incapable.”

Maduro alleges U.S.-led sabotage is the cause, citing “imperial aggression” without offering up clear evidence. On Twitter, he encouraged supporters to refer to a bulletin which explained the electrical failure as a result of an international effort to have Venezuela considered a “failed” state.

The United States and dozens of other countries support Guaido’s claim that Maduro’s re-election last year was illegitimate. The U.S. has imposed oil sanctions and other economic penalties on Venezuela in an attempt to force him out of power, but he has yet to show signs of backing down

The latest outage comes just weeks after Venezuela experienced nationwide blackouts on March 7 which shut down schools, offices and factories and paralyzed nearly every part of the once oil-rich country of 31 million.

World – TIME

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): World – TIME: Japan Is Set to Announce the Name of a New Era for Its Next Emperor

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(TOKYO) — Japan’s government is holding top-secret meetings to decide a new era name for soon-to-be-emperor Naruhito, the crown prince who will succeed the Chrysanthemum throne from his father May 1.

Emperor Akihito is abdicating on April 30, with his era of “Heisei” coming to an end.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government later Monday will unveil the era name, or “gengo,” for Naruhito’s reign.

It comes a month ahead of the switch to allow the government, businesses and other sectors time to adjust to the change that still affects many parts of Japan’s society, even though the system is not compulsory and the emperor has no political power under Japan’s postwar constitution.

Under the 1979 era name law, Abe has appointed a panel of experts on classical Chinese and Japanese literature to nominate two to five names for top officials to choose from. The names must meet the strict criteria — easy to read and write but not commonly or previously used for an era name.

Japanese media have scrambled to get scoops out of a new era name. Rumors included “Ankyu,” which uses the same Chinese character as in Abe’s family name, though it is unlikely to be the choice.

The name selection procedure started in mid-March when Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga asked a handful of unidentified scholars to nominate two to five era names each. Suga hasn’t made clear how he will present the new name, but hinted he may follow his late predecessor Keizo Obuchi, who is remembered for holding up framed calligraphy of “Heisei” in 1989 at the first televised announcement of an era name.

While a growing number of Japanese prefer the Western calendar over the Japanese system in a highly digitalized and globalized society, the era name is still widely used in government and business documents. Elders often use it to identify their generations.

Discussing and guessing new era names in advance is not considered a taboo this time because Akihito is abdicating. Era name change is also a time for many Japanese to reflect on the outgoing and incoming decades.

Akihito’s era of “Heisei,” which means “achieving peace,” was the first without a war in Japan’s modern history, but is also remembered as lost years of economic deflation and natural disasters.

Heisei was the first era name decided by the government under the postwar constitution, in which the emperor was stripped of political power and had no say over the choice. Still, the government, with its highly secretive and sensitive handling of the process, is underscoring that “the emperor has power in an invisible, subtle way,” says Hirohito Suzuki, a Toyo University sociologist.

Era name changes are creating businesses for both the outgoing and the incoming. Anything dubbed “last of Heisei” attracts Akihito fans, while others are waiting to submit marriage certificates or filing other official registration until the new era starts. Analysts say the era change that expands the “golden week” holidays to 10 days on May 1 could buoy tourism and other recreational spending.

World – TIME

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


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