Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: 3D Printing 100 Times Faster With Light

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Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new
approach to 3D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up
to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes, University
of Michigan researchers have shown.

3D printing could change the game for relatively small manufacturing
jobs, producing fewer than 10,000 identical items, because it would
mean that the objects could be made without the need for a mold costing
upwards of $10,000. But the most familiar form of 3D printing, which is
sort of like building 3D objects with a series of 1D lines, hasn’t been
able to fill that gap on typical production timescales of a week or
two.

“Using conventional approaches, that’s not really attainable unless
you have hundreds of machines,” said Timothy Scott, U-M associate
professor of chemical engineering who co-led the development of the new
3D printing approach with Mark Burns, the T.C. Chang Professor of
Engineering at U-M.

Their method solidifies the liquid resin using two lights to control
where the resin hardens–and where it stays fluid. This enables the
team to solidify the resin in more sophisticated patterns. They can make
a 3D bas-relief in a single shot rather than in a series of 1D lines or
2D cross-sections. Their printing demonstrations include a lattice, a
toy boat and a block M.

“It’s one of the first true 3D printers ever made,” said Burns, professor of chemical engineering and biomedical engineering.

But the true 3D approach is no mere stunt–it was necessary to
overcome the limitations of earlier vat-printing efforts. Namely, the
resin tends to solidify on the window that the light shines through,
stopping the print job just as it gets started.

By creating a relatively large region where no solidification
occurs, thicker resins–potentially with strengthening powder
additives–can be used to produce more durable objects. The method also
bests the structural integrity of filament 3D printing, as those objects
have weak points at the interfaces between layers.

“You can get much tougher, much more wear-resistant materials,” Scott said.

An earlier solution to the solidification-on-window problem was a
window that lets oxygen through. The oxygen penetrates into the resin
and halts the solidification near the window, leaving a film of fluid
that will allow the newly printed surface to be pulled away.

But because this gap is only about as thick as a piece of
transparent tape, the resin must be very runny to flow fast enough into
the tiny gap between the newly solidified object and the window as the
part is pulled up. This has limited vat printing to small, customized
products that will be treated relatively gently, such as dental devices
and shoe insoles.

By replacing the oxygen with a second light to halt solidification,
the Michigan team can produce a much larger gap between the object and
the window–millimeters thick–allowing resin to flow in thousands of
times faster.

The key to success is the chemistry of the resin. In conventional
systems, there is only one reaction. A photoactivator hardens the resin
wherever light shines. In the Michigan system, there is also a
photoinhibitor, which responds to a different wavelength of light.

Rather than merely controlling solidification in a 2D plane, as
current vat-printing techniques do, the Michigan team can pattern the
two kinds of light to harden the resin at essentially any 3D place near
the illumination window.

U-M has filed three patent applications to protect the multiple
inventive aspects of the approach, and Scott is preparing to launch a
startup company.

A paper describing this research will be published in Science Advances, titled, “Rapid, continuous additive manufacturing by volumetric polymerization inhibition patterning.”

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: 3D Printing 100 Times Faster With Light

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Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new
approach to 3D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up
to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes, University
of Michigan researchers have shown.

3D printing could change the game for relatively small manufacturing
jobs, producing fewer than 10,000 identical items, because it would
mean that the objects could be made without the need for a mold costing
upwards of $10,000. But the most familiar form of 3D printing, which is
sort of like building 3D objects with a series of 1D lines, hasn’t been
able to fill that gap on typical production timescales of a week or
two.

“Using conventional approaches, that’s not really attainable unless
you have hundreds of machines,” said Timothy Scott, U-M associate
professor of chemical engineering who co-led the development of the new
3D printing approach with Mark Burns, the T.C. Chang Professor of
Engineering at U-M.

Their method solidifies the liquid resin using two lights to control
where the resin hardens–and where it stays fluid. This enables the
team to solidify the resin in more sophisticated patterns. They can make
a 3D bas-relief in a single shot rather than in a series of 1D lines or
2D cross-sections. Their printing demonstrations include a lattice, a
toy boat and a block M.

“It’s one of the first true 3D printers ever made,” said Burns, professor of chemical engineering and biomedical engineering.

But the true 3D approach is no mere stunt–it was necessary to
overcome the limitations of earlier vat-printing efforts. Namely, the
resin tends to solidify on the window that the light shines through,
stopping the print job just as it gets started.

By creating a relatively large region where no solidification
occurs, thicker resins–potentially with strengthening powder
additives–can be used to produce more durable objects. The method also
bests the structural integrity of filament 3D printing, as those objects
have weak points at the interfaces between layers.

“You can get much tougher, much more wear-resistant materials,” Scott said.

An earlier solution to the solidification-on-window problem was a
window that lets oxygen through. The oxygen penetrates into the resin
and halts the solidification near the window, leaving a film of fluid
that will allow the newly printed surface to be pulled away.

But because this gap is only about as thick as a piece of
transparent tape, the resin must be very runny to flow fast enough into
the tiny gap between the newly solidified object and the window as the
part is pulled up. This has limited vat printing to small, customized
products that will be treated relatively gently, such as dental devices
and shoe insoles.

By replacing the oxygen with a second light to halt solidification,
the Michigan team can produce a much larger gap between the object and
the window–millimeters thick–allowing resin to flow in thousands of
times faster.

The key to success is the chemistry of the resin. In conventional
systems, there is only one reaction. A photoactivator hardens the resin
wherever light shines. In the Michigan system, there is also a
photoinhibitor, which responds to a different wavelength of light.

Rather than merely controlling solidification in a 2D plane, as
current vat-printing techniques do, the Michigan team can pattern the
two kinds of light to harden the resin at essentially any 3D place near
the illumination window.

U-M has filed three patent applications to protect the multiple
inventive aspects of the approach, and Scott is preparing to launch a
startup company.

A paper describing this research will be published in Science Advances, titled, “Rapid, continuous additive manufacturing by volumetric polymerization inhibition patterning.”

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: 3D Printing 100 Times Faster With Light

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Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new
approach to 3D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up
to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes, University
of Michigan researchers have shown.

3D printing could change the game for relatively small manufacturing
jobs, producing fewer than 10,000 identical items, because it would
mean that the objects could be made without the need for a mold costing
upwards of $10,000. But the most familiar form of 3D printing, which is
sort of like building 3D objects with a series of 1D lines, hasn’t been
able to fill that gap on typical production timescales of a week or
two.

“Using conventional approaches, that’s not really attainable unless
you have hundreds of machines,” said Timothy Scott, U-M associate
professor of chemical engineering who co-led the development of the new
3D printing approach with Mark Burns, the T.C. Chang Professor of
Engineering at U-M.

Their method solidifies the liquid resin using two lights to control
where the resin hardens–and where it stays fluid. This enables the
team to solidify the resin in more sophisticated patterns. They can make
a 3D bas-relief in a single shot rather than in a series of 1D lines or
2D cross-sections. Their printing demonstrations include a lattice, a
toy boat and a block M.

“It’s one of the first true 3D printers ever made,” said Burns, professor of chemical engineering and biomedical engineering.

But the true 3D approach is no mere stunt–it was necessary to
overcome the limitations of earlier vat-printing efforts. Namely, the
resin tends to solidify on the window that the light shines through,
stopping the print job just as it gets started.

By creating a relatively large region where no solidification
occurs, thicker resins–potentially with strengthening powder
additives–can be used to produce more durable objects. The method also
bests the structural integrity of filament 3D printing, as those objects
have weak points at the interfaces between layers.

“You can get much tougher, much more wear-resistant materials,” Scott said.

An earlier solution to the solidification-on-window problem was a
window that lets oxygen through. The oxygen penetrates into the resin
and halts the solidification near the window, leaving a film of fluid
that will allow the newly printed surface to be pulled away.

But because this gap is only about as thick as a piece of
transparent tape, the resin must be very runny to flow fast enough into
the tiny gap between the newly solidified object and the window as the
part is pulled up. This has limited vat printing to small, customized
products that will be treated relatively gently, such as dental devices
and shoe insoles.

By replacing the oxygen with a second light to halt solidification,
the Michigan team can produce a much larger gap between the object and
the window–millimeters thick–allowing resin to flow in thousands of
times faster.

The key to success is the chemistry of the resin. In conventional
systems, there is only one reaction. A photoactivator hardens the resin
wherever light shines. In the Michigan system, there is also a
photoinhibitor, which responds to a different wavelength of light.

Rather than merely controlling solidification in a 2D plane, as
current vat-printing techniques do, the Michigan team can pattern the
two kinds of light to harden the resin at essentially any 3D place near
the illumination window.

U-M has filed three patent applications to protect the multiple
inventive aspects of the approach, and Scott is preparing to launch a
startup company.

A paper describing this research will be published in Science Advances, titled, “Rapid, continuous additive manufacturing by volumetric polymerization inhibition patterning.”

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: New Policy Design Needed To Tackle Global Environmental Threat

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A pioneering new report has devised a seven-point plan to help
policymakers devise new, coherent and collaborative strategies to tackle
the greatest global environmental threats.

A team of international researchers, including experts from the
Land, Environment, Economics and Policy (LEEP) Institute at the
University of Exeter, has examined how politicians and legislators can
develop a new way to tackle the growing threat of climate change.

The perspective piece, which is published as the cover article in Nature Sustainability,
comes in response to advice from leading scientists, suggesting that
the human impact on the environment are already tipping the world into a
new geologically significant era.

Called the Anthropocene, this new era is defined by the effect
human-kind has already caused on Earth, from mass extinctions of plant
and animal species, polluted oceans and altered atmosphere.

In the new report, the scientists argue that while policies are
available, there also needs to be a new way to tackle the geographical,
boundary, spatial, ecological and socio-political complexities of the
issue; and that will require working together across disciplines.

Professor Ian Bateman of LEEP and co-author of the paper said: “The
paper shows that the integrated nature of the planetary boundary
problems requires an integrated policy response.

“Traditional policies tend to be highly piecemeal, highly
inefficient, prone to failure and can even be counterproductive. Such
policies take vital resources from key areas while providing short term
sticking-plaster efforts for high visibility, often politically
motivated causes.”

Recent research into the Anthropocene has suggested that there are multiple threats to the resilience of the Earth systems.

While the report acknowledges that there are no ‘simple solutions’,
it does outline seven guiding principles to help tackle the growing
environmental threat brought by man-made climate change.

These include selecting existing, robust policies to help formulate
policy decisions, the need for decisions to be made consistently across
regional, national and global boundaries, and a more conclusive look at
the true extent that the environment is being impacted.

The report is authored by Professor Bateman, Dr Donna Carless and
Amanda Robinson from Exeter, alongside some of the world’s leading
researchers in the field.

These include acclaimed natural scientists Professor Johan Rockström
(Stockholm Resilience Centre) and Professor Will Steffen (Australian
National University) – who pioneered the planetary boundary and
Anthropocene concepts – and eminent environmental economists including
Professor Thomas Sterner (University of Gothenburg), Professor Edward
Barbier (Colorado State University), Professor Carolyn Fischer
(Resources for the Future, Washington) and Professor Stephen Polasky
(University of Minnesota).

Together the team undertook the first unified assessment of the
policy options for tackling the challenges of the Anthropocene. These
include the integrated global problems of climate change; the pollution
of air, land, freshwater and sea; and the rapid loss of genetic
diversity around the world.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: New Policy Design Needed To Tackle Global Environmental Threat

Spread the Knowledge
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A pioneering new report has devised a seven-point plan to help
policymakers devise new, coherent and collaborative strategies to tackle
the greatest global environmental threats.

A team of international researchers, including experts from the
Land, Environment, Economics and Policy (LEEP) Institute at the
University of Exeter, has examined how politicians and legislators can
develop a new way to tackle the growing threat of climate change.

The perspective piece, which is published as the cover article in Nature Sustainability,
comes in response to advice from leading scientists, suggesting that
the human impact on the environment are already tipping the world into a
new geologically significant era.

Called the Anthropocene, this new era is defined by the effect
human-kind has already caused on Earth, from mass extinctions of plant
and animal species, polluted oceans and altered atmosphere.

In the new report, the scientists argue that while policies are
available, there also needs to be a new way to tackle the geographical,
boundary, spatial, ecological and socio-political complexities of the
issue; and that will require working together across disciplines.

Professor Ian Bateman of LEEP and co-author of the paper said: “The
paper shows that the integrated nature of the planetary boundary
problems requires an integrated policy response.

“Traditional policies tend to be highly piecemeal, highly
inefficient, prone to failure and can even be counterproductive. Such
policies take vital resources from key areas while providing short term
sticking-plaster efforts for high visibility, often politically
motivated causes.”

Recent research into the Anthropocene has suggested that there are multiple threats to the resilience of the Earth systems.

While the report acknowledges that there are no ‘simple solutions’,
it does outline seven guiding principles to help tackle the growing
environmental threat brought by man-made climate change.

These include selecting existing, robust policies to help formulate
policy decisions, the need for decisions to be made consistently across
regional, national and global boundaries, and a more conclusive look at
the true extent that the environment is being impacted.

The report is authored by Professor Bateman, Dr Donna Carless and
Amanda Robinson from Exeter, alongside some of the world’s leading
researchers in the field.

These include acclaimed natural scientists Professor Johan Rockström
(Stockholm Resilience Centre) and Professor Will Steffen (Australian
National University) – who pioneered the planetary boundary and
Anthropocene concepts – and eminent environmental economists including
Professor Thomas Sterner (University of Gothenburg), Professor Edward
Barbier (Colorado State University), Professor Carolyn Fischer
(Resources for the Future, Washington) and Professor Stephen Polasky
(University of Minnesota).

Together the team undertook the first unified assessment of the
policy options for tackling the challenges of the Anthropocene. These
include the integrated global problems of climate change; the pollution
of air, land, freshwater and sea; and the rapid loss of genetic
diversity around the world.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: New Policy Design Needed To Tackle Global Environmental Threat

Spread the Knowledge
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A pioneering new report has devised a seven-point plan to help
policymakers devise new, coherent and collaborative strategies to tackle
the greatest global environmental threats.

A team of international researchers, including experts from the
Land, Environment, Economics and Policy (LEEP) Institute at the
University of Exeter, has examined how politicians and legislators can
develop a new way to tackle the growing threat of climate change.

The perspective piece, which is published as the cover article in Nature Sustainability,
comes in response to advice from leading scientists, suggesting that
the human impact on the environment are already tipping the world into a
new geologically significant era.

Called the Anthropocene, this new era is defined by the effect
human-kind has already caused on Earth, from mass extinctions of plant
and animal species, polluted oceans and altered atmosphere.

In the new report, the scientists argue that while policies are
available, there also needs to be a new way to tackle the geographical,
boundary, spatial, ecological and socio-political complexities of the
issue; and that will require working together across disciplines.

Professor Ian Bateman of LEEP and co-author of the paper said: “The
paper shows that the integrated nature of the planetary boundary
problems requires an integrated policy response.

“Traditional policies tend to be highly piecemeal, highly
inefficient, prone to failure and can even be counterproductive. Such
policies take vital resources from key areas while providing short term
sticking-plaster efforts for high visibility, often politically
motivated causes.”

Recent research into the Anthropocene has suggested that there are multiple threats to the resilience of the Earth systems.

While the report acknowledges that there are no ‘simple solutions’,
it does outline seven guiding principles to help tackle the growing
environmental threat brought by man-made climate change.

These include selecting existing, robust policies to help formulate
policy decisions, the need for decisions to be made consistently across
regional, national and global boundaries, and a more conclusive look at
the true extent that the environment is being impacted.

The report is authored by Professor Bateman, Dr Donna Carless and
Amanda Robinson from Exeter, alongside some of the world’s leading
researchers in the field.

These include acclaimed natural scientists Professor Johan Rockström
(Stockholm Resilience Centre) and Professor Will Steffen (Australian
National University) – who pioneered the planetary boundary and
Anthropocene concepts – and eminent environmental economists including
Professor Thomas Sterner (University of Gothenburg), Professor Edward
Barbier (Colorado State University), Professor Carolyn Fischer
(Resources for the Future, Washington) and Professor Stephen Polasky
(University of Minnesota).

Together the team undertook the first unified assessment of the
policy options for tackling the challenges of the Anthropocene. These
include the integrated global problems of climate change; the pollution
of air, land, freshwater and sea; and the rapid loss of genetic
diversity around the world.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Spain: Police Arrest 15 In Armenian Gang’s Tennis Match-Fixing Probe

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Spanish police arrested 15 people, and said another 68 have been investigated, as part of probe into tennis match-fixing by an Armenian criminal gang, Deadspin reports.

In a statement released on Thursday, January 10, the Spanish Civil Guard said that 28 of those 83 people are professional tennis players, one of whom took part in the last U.S. Open. The statement doesn’t name any of the individuals who have been investigated or detained.

“A group of Armenian individuals used a professional player who served
as the link between them and the other members of the network,” reads
the statement.

“Once the bribe had been paid, the Armenians went
to the match venues to use their imposing muscle to make sure that the
player kept their end of the deal. They then gave the order for bets to
be laid both nationally and internationally.”

The Civil Guard
said that the operation had been prompted by complaints from the Tennis
Integrity Unit, the sport’s anti-corruption body. Law enforcement began
to investigate a Spanish player, which led to the Armenian group.

According to the Civil Guard, which investigated the corruption along
with Europol and Spanish tax authorities, the match-fixing group had
been operating since at least February 2017, generating millions of
dollars in profit. During the operation, police searched 11 addresses in
Spain, finding €167,000, a handgun, stolen identity documents, jewelry,
more than 50 electronic devices, and five luxury vehicles. Law
enforcement froze 42 bank accounts.

As has been repeated in
numerous reports and investigations into corruption in tennis,
match-fixing is rampant in lower levels of professional tennis where
many thousands of players don’t make any money. Last month, yet another
report from the Independent Review Panel, which was tasked with finding
ways to clean up the sports after Buzzfeed and the BBC published a
report in 2016 that revealed widespread match-fixing, recommended that
there be no live streaming, or scoring data provided, at low-level
professional tennis tournaments.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Spain: Police Arrest 15 In Armenian Gang’s Tennis Match-Fixing Probe

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Spanish police arrested 15 people, and said another 68 have been investigated, as part of probe into tennis match-fixing by an Armenian criminal gang, Deadspin reports.

In a statement released on Thursday, January 10, the Spanish Civil Guard said that 28 of those 83 people are professional tennis players, one of whom took part in the last U.S. Open. The statement doesn’t name any of the individuals who have been investigated or detained.

“A group of Armenian individuals used a professional player who served
as the link between them and the other members of the network,” reads
the statement.

“Once the bribe had been paid, the Armenians went
to the match venues to use their imposing muscle to make sure that the
player kept their end of the deal. They then gave the order for bets to
be laid both nationally and internationally.”

The Civil Guard
said that the operation had been prompted by complaints from the Tennis
Integrity Unit, the sport’s anti-corruption body. Law enforcement began
to investigate a Spanish player, which led to the Armenian group.

According to the Civil Guard, which investigated the corruption along
with Europol and Spanish tax authorities, the match-fixing group had
been operating since at least February 2017, generating millions of
dollars in profit. During the operation, police searched 11 addresses in
Spain, finding €167,000, a handgun, stolen identity documents, jewelry,
more than 50 electronic devices, and five luxury vehicles. Law
enforcement froze 42 bank accounts.

As has been repeated in
numerous reports and investigations into corruption in tennis,
match-fixing is rampant in lower levels of professional tennis where
many thousands of players don’t make any money. Last month, yet another
report from the Independent Review Panel, which was tasked with finding
ways to clean up the sports after Buzzfeed and the BBC published a
report in 2016 that revealed widespread match-fixing, recommended that
there be no live streaming, or scoring data provided, at low-level
professional tennis tournaments.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Wuerl Knew McCarrick Abuse Allegations In 2004

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By Ed Condon and JD Flynn

An allegation of misconduct against Archbishop Theodore McCarrick was reported to Cardinal Donald Wuerl in 2004, despite Wuerl’s insistence he knew nothing about McCarrick’s alleged sexual misconduct until 2018.

Wuerl forwarded the report to the apostolic nuncio in Washington, DC, the Diocese of Pittsburgh said Thursday.

A spokesman for the Archdiocese of Washington confirmed to CNA that
an allegation against McCarrick was presented to Wuerl while he served
as Bishop of Pittsburgh, as part of a complaint made by laicized priest
Robert Ciolek.

In a statement, the Diocese of Pittsburgh said Jan. 10 that laicized
priest Robert Ciolek appeared in November 2004 before its diocesan
review board to discuss an allegation of abuse Ciolek had made against a
Pittsburgh priest.

During that meeting, “Mr. Ciolek also spoke of his abuse by
then-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick. This was the first time the Diocese of
Pittsburgh learned of this allegation,” the statement said.

“A few days later, then-Bishop Donald Wuerl made a report of the allegation to the Apostolic Nuncio to the United States.”

The disclosure is the first confirmation by Church authorities that
Wuerl was aware of allegations against McCarrick before the Archdiocese
of New York announced in June 2018 a credible allegation of sexual abuse
of a minor made against McCarrick.

The news raises questions about 2018 statements from Wuerl that
denied he had even heard “rumors” about his predecessor as Archbishop of
Washington.

Ed McFadden, spokesman for the Archdiocese of Washington, told CNA
that in 2004 Ciolek “asked that his complaint against McCarrick be
forwarded to the [apostolic] nuncio. And it was.”

“Wuerl forwarded the file and his complaint to the nunciature in 2004.”

“At that time Ciolek asked for complete confidentiality, and that his name never be mentioned.”

The statement from the Diocese of Pittsburgh confirmed that Ciolek
had originally insisted on confidentiality, but also that he had
recently authorized the diocese to speak about the matter.

“Mr. Ciolek asked that the allegation regarding then-Cardinal
McCarrick be shared only with ecclesiastical – that is – Church
authorities,” the statement said.

“In November 2018 Mr. Ciolek authorized the Diocese of Pittsburgh to respond to press inquiries about this matter.”

The diocese confirmed that Ciolek visited Pittsburgh recently to
review files related to his complaint, and that diocesan officials were
aware that he intended to discuss the matter with the press.

Ciolek reached a settlement agreement with three New Jersey dioceses
in 2005 in connection with clerical sexual abuse allegations. The
settlement awarded Ciolek some $80,000 in response to allegations that
concerned both McCarrick and a Catholic school teacher.

The Diocese of Pittsburgh said it was not aware of the settlement
until July 2018. Similarly, the Archdiocese of Washington said Wuerl was
unaware of the 2005 settlement until that time.

Details of Ciolek’s settlement were first reported in September 2018. At that time, the Washington Post reported that the settlement agreement included references to Wuerl, and to the Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Neither the Pittsburgh diocese nor McFadden offered detail on the
specific allegations made against McCarrick, but McFadden said they
concerned behavior by McCarrick at his New Jersey beach house, where the
archbishop is alleged to have shared beds with seminarians, and
exchanged backrubs with them.

McFadden said Ciolek “never claimed direct sexual engagement with McCarrick” in his complaint to Wuerl.

The news that Wuerl received a formal complaint against McCarrick as
early as 2004, and forwarded it to the apostolic nunciature in
Washington raises serious questions about the intended meaning of
Wuerl’s 2018 statements concerning McCarrick.

Wuerl wrote in a June 21 letter that he was “shocked and saddened” by allegations made against McCarrick.

In the same letter, Wuerl affirmed that “no claim – credible or
otherwise – has been made against Cardinal McCarrick during his time
here in Washington.”  

In a Jan. 10 statement, the Archdiocese of Washington said that
“Cardinal Wuerl has attempted to be accurate in addressing questions
about Archbishop McCarrick.  His statements previously referred to
claims of sexual abuse of a minor by Archbishop McCarrick, as well as
rumors of such behavior. The Cardinal stands by those statements, which
were not intended to be imprecise.”  

“Cardinal Wuerl has said that until the accusation of abuse of a
minor by Cardinal McCarrick was made in New York, no one from this
archdiocese has come forward with an accusation of abuse by Archbishop
McCarrick during his time in Washington.”

“It is important to note that Archbishop Theodore McCarrick was
appointed to the Archdiocese of Washington in November 2000 and named a
cardinal in February 2001, years before Mr. Ciolek made his claims.
Then-Bishop Wuerl was not involved in the decision-making process
resulting in the appointment and promotion.”

Wuerl’s resignation as Archbishop of Washington was accepted October
12, 2018. The cardinal was appointed by Pope Francis as apostolic
administrator, or interim leader, of the archdiocese until a successor
is appointed.

The cardinal fell under heavy criticism in the second half of last
year, after a Pennsylvania grand jury report about clerical sexual abuse
released in July raised questions about his leadership while he served
as Bishop of Pittsburgh.

Despite earning a reputation as an early champion of “zero-tolerance”
policies and the use of lay-led diocesan review boards to handle
accusations of clerical sexual abuse, Wuerl faced questions about his
handling of several cases during his time in Pittsburgh after he was
named more than 200 times in the grand jury report.

The disclosure also raises further questions about how McCarrick was
able to remain in office and in apparently unrestricted ministry during
retirement. In July 2018, a priest named Fr. Boniface Ramsey told the
New York Times that he expressed to Church authorities concerns about
McCarrick’s conduct with seminarians as early as 2000, when McCarrick
was appointed Archbishop of Washington.

Concerned by the appointment, Ramsey said that he contacted
then-nuncio Archbishop Gabriel Montalvo Higuera to report allegations of
McCarrick’s misconduct with seminarians in his beach house. Ramsey said
that he had heard accounts of this misconduct from his own seminary
students.
 
Ramsey said he put his concerns in writing at the request of Montalvo, who promised to forward them to Rome.

Ramsey subsequently released a letter from the Vatican’s Secretariat
of State, dated 2006 and signed by Cardinal Leonardo Sandri,
acknowledging his complaint of 2000, apparently confirming that Montalvo
had sent Ramsey’s letter to Rome.

Montalvo was still in his position when Wuerl reportedly forwarded
Ciolek’s complaint in 2004, and would remain in Washington until August
2006, when he died suddenly.

McFadden told CNA that while he could confirm Wuerl sent Ciolek’s
complaint to the nuncio as requested, neither he nor Wuerl were aware
that any further action was taken on the matter.

“As far as we can tell, the nunciature never acted on that, but we don’t have any more information.”

Montalvo’s successor as nuncio in Washington was Archbishop Pietro
Sambi. CNA has previously reported that in 2008, acting on explicit
instructions from Pope Benedict XVI, Sambi ordered McCarrick to move out of the archdiocesan seminary in which he was living during his retirement.

That order, and other measures which may have been imposed on
McCarrick during his retirement, were a central feature of the
allegations of Sambi’s own successor, Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano.

In his now-famous “testimony,” released in August last year, Vigano
insisted that Wuerl had been aware of restrictions placed on McCarrick
during his retirement for several years, and that they directly
concerned his interactions with seminarians.

In a subsequent letter, Vigano said that these measures were not
technically “sanctions” but “provisions,” “conditions,” and
restrictions,” and they may not have been imposed in writing by Pope
Benedict.

In response to Vigano’s claims, Wuerl denied “receiving documentation
or information from the Holy See specific to Cardinal McCarrick’s
behavior or any of the prohibitions on his life and ministry suggested
by Archbishop Vigano.”

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Gamblers Predicted Brexit Before Financial Traders

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nternational finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter
when it came to getting the Brexit result right on EU referendum night,
according to research.

A study shows that gamblers sensed the Leave vote coming an hour
before the currency experts in the city – creating a window of
“arbitrage” during which the price difference between betting and FX
markets yielded up to a 7% return on the pound.

Economists from the University of Cambridge compared the behaviours
of the Betfair betting market and the sterling-dollar exchange rate from
closure of the polls at 10pm, when odds of 10 to 1 were being offered
on Brexit.

Both markets were “informationally inefficient”: very slow to react
despite the data already available, as well as that flooding in from
vote counts across the country. This meant there was money to be made by
trading early on either market, say researchers.

The study shows the betting market moved to a Leave result around
3am, by which time Brexit odds had reversed (1 to 10). Yet the foreign
exchange market didn’t fully adjust to the reality of Brexit until
around 4am. At 4:40am the BBC predicted a Leave victory.

The difference in efficiency between the two markets created an hour
when selling £1 and hedging the result of the referendum on Betfair
would have made up to nine US cents of profit per pound sterling – a
significant “unleveraged return” that, in theory at least, could have
seen astute traders make millions.

Researchers say the findings support the idea that gambling, or
so-called “prediction markets”, might provide better forecasts of
election outcomes than either experts or polls.

“Clearly, punters trading on Betfair are a different group of people
to those dealing in FX for international finance. It looks like the
gamblers had a better sense that Leave could win, or that it could at
least go either way,” said Dr Tom Auld, lead author of the study
published recently in the International Journal of Forecasting.

“Our findings suggest that participants across both markets suffered
a behavioural bias as the results unfolded. Initially, both traders and
gamblers could not believe the UK was voting to leave the EU, but this
disbelief lingered far longer in the city.”

Auld and his co-author Prof Oliver Linton used the expected outcomes
for each voting area – data that was publicly available prior to the
referendum – to create a “forecasting model”.

By adjusting it with each actual result in turn, they say that their
model would have predicted the final result from around 1:30am had it
been deployed on the night.

“According to theories such as the ‘efficient market hypothesis’,
the markets discount all publicly available information, so you cannot
get an edge on the market with data already out there,” said Auld.

“However, using data publicly available at the time we show that the
financial markets were very inefficient, and should have predicted
Brexit possibly over two hours before they actually did.”

“If there is a second referendum, the vote should be better
understood by markets – in line with a theoretical concept called the
adaptive markets hypothesis. Studies such as ours will mean that market
participants will be primed to profit from any possible opportunities
and inefficiencies,” he said.

The researchers compared their modelling with gambling and currency
market data from EU referendum night. The website Betfair provided data
from their exchange platform – the world’s largest betting exchange –
between 10am on June 23 and 5am on June 24.

More than 182,000 individual bets were placed with Betfair and over
88,000 trades were made in the GBP futures market during this seven-hour
window. Trading on Brexit broke records for a political event on
Betfair, with over £128m wagered including over £50m that was matched on
the night of the vote itself.

“Prediction markets such as betting exchanges are an ‘incentive
compatible’ way to elicit the private opinions of participants, as
people are putting their money where their mouth is, whereas what they
tell pollsters can be cheap talk,” added Auld.

“Prediction markets could in theory be used to help value or price
financial assets during events such as major votes. This is an area I
will be focusing on for future research.”

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


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