Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites): Defense One – All Content: Trump Just Killed His Own Defense Strategy

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House, Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019, with acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, right.

Defense One – All Content

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites): Voice of America: Insurers Sue California Utility Over Wildfire Damages

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Several insurance companies have filed lawsuits blaming Pacific Gas & Electric Co. for a deadly California wildfire that destroyed 14,000 homes and triggered billions of dollars in insurance claims.

The lawsuits filed by Allstate, State Farm, USAA and their subsidiaries come on top of several other cases filed by victims of the Camp Fire, which devastated the towns of Paradise, Magalia and Concow north of Sacramento after it started Nov. 8.

Investigators have not pinpointed a cause for the fire. But the insurance companies note in their lawsuits that flames ignited near the site of a transmission-line irregularity reported by the utility. They also note a potential second ignition point involving PG&E distribution lines. 

​California law

Under California law, PG&E is held entirely liable if lawyers can prove the fire is linked to the utility’s power lines or other equipment, a fact that sent shares of the company tumbling following the start of the fire.

Following a series of deadly fires in 2017 in Northern California’s wine country, PG&E executives and lobbyists tried to persuade state lawmakers to change the legal standard and reduce the company’s liability. Lawmakers declined, but they allowed the company to pass along some of the costs from the 2017 fires to its customers in hopes of sparing it from bankruptcy. The law does not help the company for the 2018 blazes.

The lawsuits were filed last month in Sacramento County Superior Court. They were first reported by the Sacramento Business Journal.

“We are aware of lawsuits regarding the Camp Fire,” Lynsey Paulo, a PG&E spokeswoman, said in a statement. “Our focus continues to be on assessing infrastructure to further enhance safety and helping our customers recover and rebuild.”

​Manslaughter charges possible

PG&E, one of the nation’s largest electric utilities with more than 5 million customers in Northern and Central California, is facing legal and regulatory challenges on a number of fronts, including the potential for criminal charges.

The California attorney general told a judge last week that PG&E could face charges as serious as involuntary manslaughter or murder if investigators determine that reckless operation or maintenance of power equipment caused any recent wildfires in the state.

A federal judge overseeing a case that resulted in a criminal conviction for the company following a 2010 pipeline explosion has asked PG&E to explain any role it may have had in the Camp Fire. The judge could impose new requirements on the utility if it’s found to have violated its probation in the pipeline case.

Voice of America

1. Russia from Michael_Novakhov (114 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: New York City sees massive lines for salads after ‘eat healthy’ New Year’s resolutions

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

New Yorkers trying to make good on “eat healthy” resolutions are mobbing salad joints — leaving many on long lines cursing their radicchio-strewn diets.

FOX News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: US-China Trade War: Making Up Is Hard To Do – Analysis

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

By Caleb Mills

In the midst of rising tariffs and economic uncertainty, a chord of
relief was struck when on December 2nd, President Donald Trump and
Chinese leader Xi Jinping announced a much-needed truce
in their emerging trade war. Needless to say, businesses on both sides
of the Pacific breathed a sigh of relief in mere hours. Hong Kong’s Hang
Seng index climbed 2.5% and the Shanghai Composite index jumped 2.6%. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index rose 1%. In the West, the UK’s FTSE 100 index, the CAC40 in France, and Germany’s DAX were all up by about 2% at the end of the day.

But a truce isn’t peace, and that has been reflected by the political
maneuvering in both Washington and Beijing as the two governments
prepare for the next round of trade negotiations. Which begs the
question: What’s going on?

While this temporary armistice may have been struck in Buenos Aires
during the G20 Summit, the origins of the US-China trade war goes way
back to predate Trump’s populism or Xi’s imperial governance.

Trade relations with China, as well as many other Asian nations, for
America, has always had more than just pure capitalistic benefit at
heart. After all, it wasn’t until 1979 that the United States even
established ‘normal’ economic ties with the Chinese. Up until Richard
Nixon’s attempts to thaw relations during the Vietnam war, and President
Deng Xiaoping’s liberalization
of economic policy, the U.S. position on China had remained the same:
passive containment. But it lacked heart, particularly in the face of
greater foes such as the Soviet Union. In some cases, like with the
Nixon Administration, Washington even viewed China’s contentious
relationship with Moscow as potential shrapnel to be logged against the
Kremlin.

In fact, the average American had a rather positive view of China as a result. In 1979, Gallup
polling showed China’s favorability rating in the U.S. was 64%. In
fact, up until the early 90s, China remained relatively popular, peaking
at 72%. Even in the past five years, Uncle Sam’s Pacific neighbor has
hovered in the 45% approval range back home.

Hoping to avoid conflict while still spreading Western concepts of
economics and governance, much of America’s reasoning for a purposefully
lax trade policy with China was the hopes that the connection would
lead Beijing into the 21st Century as, at the very least, a neutralized
threat. And to an extent, it worked. In 2001, the United States even backed China’s entrance into the WTO. But perhaps in an ironic twist to the US foreign policy of self-preservation and human rights, these initiatives designed to push China toward a freer market worked a little too well.

There’s even a term for it: Red Capitalism, which also happens to be a
book written by Fraser J. T. Howie, a researcher who’s conducted
extensive studies on China’s maneuvering in international markets. When asked
about the recent truce, Howie told the Washington Post in an email
“Markets should be happy, in that the worst is postponed. But I don’t
see the West ever going back to business as usual with China. Too many
genies have been let out of bottles.”

China took advantage of the open-door policy given to them by the
United States in trade and used it to their advantage. Trade between the
two nations reached $211.6 billion in 2005, compared to the $2.4 billion exchanged in 1979. From  2001-2005, the volume of US-China trade increased
an average of 27.4 percent a year. As a result, the United States has
become the top market for Chinese merchandise and China is buying up more U.S. goods, with U.S. exports to China rising 21.5 percent in each of the last four years.

But China hasn’t been the only one utilizing these open markets. By 2030, it’s expected that US exports
to China alone will be a staggering $520 billion, according to a report
from the US-China Business Council. To put that into perspective, the combined
trade between Beijing and Washington in 2017 was worth $710 billion
dollars. The United States has continuously operated as a high-value
trade partner for the Chinese, providing trucks and construction
equipment, which totaled profits of $6.7 billion in 2014 and $7.1 billion in 2015. US exports to China made 1.8 million new jobs and $165 billion in GDP in 2015 according to the same report.

Overall, while cheaper Chinese products have created a damaging trade
deficit and led to the dissolution of countless U.S. jobs over the
years, it’s also necessary to note that this imbalance hasn’t been
without its positive effects. It’s estimated
by the US-China Business Council that the flood of cheaper products
have lowered overall prices in the marketplace by around 1.5%, which
when taking into consideration that the average family in the states
made $56,500 a year in 2015, means that this trade balance saved these
families around $850 a year.

The reasons behind this trade deficit
of $335.4 billion are rather straightforward and simple: American
businesses’ reliance on cheaper Chinese products have led to the U.S.
importing more than it exports to Beijing.

Many argue that the main reason for the economic imbalance between
these two superpowers –  China’s overall cheaper pricing – is purely an
artificial ploy by the government. By devaluing the yaun, China’s
currency, at a rate of 40%, Beijing has kept it below free-market levels. While China did agree in 2005 to a 2.1% increase in the yaun’s value, it pales in comparison to the work needed to restore the currency to normal levels, a claim backed up by the director of the Institute for International Economics, C. Fred Bergsten, among others.

Strangely enough, unlike the vast majority of issues that face the
United States, the problem of trade with China is a matter that draws
bipartisan support. A recent
UBS poll shows that 71% of U.S. business owners want a tariff increase
on Chinese products, a belief shared by 59% of high-value investors in
the same survey. Even politicians seem to agree on the issue for the
most part.

“China’s refusal to play by international economic rules cripples our
ability to compete on a level playing field.” Sen. Chuck Schumer,
current Senate Minority Leader said
back in 2006. Republican Lindsey Graham (R-SC) sponsored a bill in that
year that would have levied a 27.5 percent tariff on all Chinese
imports unless the yuan was significantly revalued. However, the bill
never made it to President Bush’s desk, as it was withdrawn in March
after the two lawmakers visited Beijing.

President Trump’s surprise victory in November of 2016 shook the
dynamic of this decades-old relationship to its core. His populistic
rhetoric and his position as the US champion of protectionism made some
think that as a man, as an idea, he was unelectable. But Donald Trump
didn’t invent the concept of ‘America First’ all by himself; he
carefully utilized the seed of discontent that had been sowed years ago.
His talk on China had always been tough, a mirrored reflection of much
of his positions in general on the campaign trail.

“China is neither an ally or a friend — they want to beat us and own our country” – a tweet from Trump on Sept. 21, 2011.

“We can’t continue to allow China to rape our country and that’s what
they’re doing. It’s the greatest theft in the history of the world.” –
another from the campaign trail in May 2, 2016.

But when Trump made his first visit to the Chinese mainland early in
his term, hints at a more moderate tone seemed to emerge. “I don’t blame
China,” Trump said
in Beijing. “After all, who can blame a country for being able to take
advantage of another country to the benefit of its citizens?” But then,
for a while, it seemed like maybe the 2016 candidate was back in the
saddle.

Tariffs on products worth around $250 billion were levied
on Chinese products by the Trump administration in 2018, with Beijing
responding with tariffs of its own. But the G20 Summit resulted in some
concrete results, with the Chinese Foreign Ministry confirming that the two leaders had instructed their teams to intensify talks. A truce in economic hostilities was also announced, a period to be accompanied by talks that should last around 90 days. A 40% decrease in Chinese tariffs on U.S. cars is also rumored to be in the works.

Yet some analysts argue that the issues go far deeper than just a trade deficit. Barclay’s Ajay Rajadhyaksha told CNBC in October at the Barclays Asia Forum in Singapore: “This is not the U.S. and NAFTA. This is not the U.S. and the European Union
… There is a significant part of the US administration that is worried
about China’s technology ambitions. The administration wants fundamental
changes in how the Chinese treat intellectual property, how they talk
to technology companies looking to invest in China. This is not about
the trade deficit. If it was, it would be easy to solve.”

Saying that it’s almost impossible to come to any truly comprehensive
conclusion on the full impact of the world’s most powerful trade
relationship is an understatement, but it’s not hard to see that things
have changed, and probably permanently. “Business as usual” isn’t a term
we can accurately use anymore when talking about these two giants of
the Pacific. The partisanship may continue, as well as the political
hearsay, but the facts remain the same. A lot rides on the coming talks,
and the impact they will have on the global economy is unpredictable.

I guess you could say: “it’s complicated.”

The opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints expressed by the authors are theirs alone and don’t reflect the official position of Geopoliticalmonitor.com or any other institution.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites): Eurasia Review: US-China Trade War: Making Up Is Hard To Do – Analysis

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

By Caleb Mills

In the midst of rising tariffs and economic uncertainty, a chord of
relief was struck when on December 2nd, President Donald Trump and
Chinese leader Xi Jinping announced a much-needed truce
in their emerging trade war. Needless to say, businesses on both sides
of the Pacific breathed a sigh of relief in mere hours. Hong Kong’s Hang
Seng index climbed 2.5% and the Shanghai Composite index jumped 2.6%. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index rose 1%. In the West, the UK’s FTSE 100 index, the CAC40 in France, and Germany’s DAX were all up by about 2% at the end of the day.

But a truce isn’t peace, and that has been reflected by the political
maneuvering in both Washington and Beijing as the two governments
prepare for the next round of trade negotiations. Which begs the
question: What’s going on?

While this temporary armistice may have been struck in Buenos Aires
during the G20 Summit, the origins of the US-China trade war goes way
back to predate Trump’s populism or Xi’s imperial governance.

Trade relations with China, as well as many other Asian nations, for
America, has always had more than just pure capitalistic benefit at
heart. After all, it wasn’t until 1979 that the United States even
established ‘normal’ economic ties with the Chinese. Up until Richard
Nixon’s attempts to thaw relations during the Vietnam war, and President
Deng Xiaoping’s liberalization
of economic policy, the U.S. position on China had remained the same:
passive containment. But it lacked heart, particularly in the face of
greater foes such as the Soviet Union. In some cases, like with the
Nixon Administration, Washington even viewed China’s contentious
relationship with Moscow as potential shrapnel to be logged against the
Kremlin.

In fact, the average American had a rather positive view of China as a result. In 1979, Gallup
polling showed China’s favorability rating in the U.S. was 64%. In
fact, up until the early 90s, China remained relatively popular, peaking
at 72%. Even in the past five years, Uncle Sam’s Pacific neighbor has
hovered in the 45% approval range back home.

Hoping to avoid conflict while still spreading Western concepts of
economics and governance, much of America’s reasoning for a purposefully
lax trade policy with China was the hopes that the connection would
lead Beijing into the 21st Century as, at the very least, a neutralized
threat. And to an extent, it worked. In 2001, the United States even backed China’s entrance into the WTO. But perhaps in an ironic twist to the US foreign policy of self-preservation and human rights, these initiatives designed to push China toward a freer market worked a little too well.

There’s even a term for it: Red Capitalism, which also happens to be a
book written by Fraser J. T. Howie, a researcher who’s conducted
extensive studies on China’s maneuvering in international markets. When asked
about the recent truce, Howie told the Washington Post in an email
“Markets should be happy, in that the worst is postponed. But I don’t
see the West ever going back to business as usual with China. Too many
genies have been let out of bottles.”

China took advantage of the open-door policy given to them by the
United States in trade and used it to their advantage. Trade between the
two nations reached $211.6 billion in 2005, compared to the $2.4 billion exchanged in 1979. From  2001-2005, the volume of US-China trade increased
an average of 27.4 percent a year. As a result, the United States has
become the top market for Chinese merchandise and China is buying up more U.S. goods, with U.S. exports to China rising 21.5 percent in each of the last four years.

But China hasn’t been the only one utilizing these open markets. By 2030, it’s expected that US exports
to China alone will be a staggering $520 billion, according to a report
from the US-China Business Council. To put that into perspective, the combined
trade between Beijing and Washington in 2017 was worth $710 billion
dollars. The United States has continuously operated as a high-value
trade partner for the Chinese, providing trucks and construction
equipment, which totaled profits of $6.7 billion in 2014 and $7.1 billion in 2015. US exports to China made 1.8 million new jobs and $165 billion in GDP in 2015 according to the same report.

Overall, while cheaper Chinese products have created a damaging trade
deficit and led to the dissolution of countless U.S. jobs over the
years, it’s also necessary to note that this imbalance hasn’t been
without its positive effects. It’s estimated
by the US-China Business Council that the flood of cheaper products
have lowered overall prices in the marketplace by around 1.5%, which
when taking into consideration that the average family in the states
made $56,500 a year in 2015, means that this trade balance saved these
families around $850 a year.

The reasons behind this trade deficit
of $335.4 billion are rather straightforward and simple: American
businesses’ reliance on cheaper Chinese products have led to the U.S.
importing more than it exports to Beijing.

Many argue that the main reason for the economic imbalance between
these two superpowers –  China’s overall cheaper pricing – is purely an
artificial ploy by the government. By devaluing the yaun, China’s
currency, at a rate of 40%, Beijing has kept it below free-market levels. While China did agree in 2005 to a 2.1% increase in the yaun’s value, it pales in comparison to the work needed to restore the currency to normal levels, a claim backed up by the director of the Institute for International Economics, C. Fred Bergsten, among others.

Strangely enough, unlike the vast majority of issues that face the
United States, the problem of trade with China is a matter that draws
bipartisan support. A recent
UBS poll shows that 71% of U.S. business owners want a tariff increase
on Chinese products, a belief shared by 59% of high-value investors in
the same survey. Even politicians seem to agree on the issue for the
most part.

“China’s refusal to play by international economic rules cripples our
ability to compete on a level playing field.” Sen. Chuck Schumer,
current Senate Minority Leader said
back in 2006. Republican Lindsey Graham (R-SC) sponsored a bill in that
year that would have levied a 27.5 percent tariff on all Chinese
imports unless the yuan was significantly revalued. However, the bill
never made it to President Bush’s desk, as it was withdrawn in March
after the two lawmakers visited Beijing.

President Trump’s surprise victory in November of 2016 shook the
dynamic of this decades-old relationship to its core. His populistic
rhetoric and his position as the US champion of protectionism made some
think that as a man, as an idea, he was unelectable. But Donald Trump
didn’t invent the concept of ‘America First’ all by himself; he
carefully utilized the seed of discontent that had been sowed years ago.
His talk on China had always been tough, a mirrored reflection of much
of his positions in general on the campaign trail.

“China is neither an ally or a friend — they want to beat us and own our country” – a tweet from Trump on Sept. 21, 2011.

“We can’t continue to allow China to rape our country and that’s what
they’re doing. It’s the greatest theft in the history of the world.” –
another from the campaign trail in May 2, 2016.

But when Trump made his first visit to the Chinese mainland early in
his term, hints at a more moderate tone seemed to emerge. “I don’t blame
China,” Trump said
in Beijing. “After all, who can blame a country for being able to take
advantage of another country to the benefit of its citizens?” But then,
for a while, it seemed like maybe the 2016 candidate was back in the
saddle.

Tariffs on products worth around $250 billion were levied
on Chinese products by the Trump administration in 2018, with Beijing
responding with tariffs of its own. But the G20 Summit resulted in some
concrete results, with the Chinese Foreign Ministry confirming that the two leaders had instructed their teams to intensify talks. A truce in economic hostilities was also announced, a period to be accompanied by talks that should last around 90 days. A 40% decrease in Chinese tariffs on U.S. cars is also rumored to be in the works.

Yet some analysts argue that the issues go far deeper than just a trade deficit. Barclay’s Ajay Rajadhyaksha told CNBC in October at the Barclays Asia Forum in Singapore: “This is not the U.S. and NAFTA. This is not the U.S. and the European Union
… There is a significant part of the US administration that is worried
about China’s technology ambitions. The administration wants fundamental
changes in how the Chinese treat intellectual property, how they talk
to technology companies looking to invest in China. This is not about
the trade deficit. If it was, it would be easy to solve.”

Saying that it’s almost impossible to come to any truly comprehensive
conclusion on the full impact of the world’s most powerful trade
relationship is an understatement, but it’s not hard to see that things
have changed, and probably permanently. “Business as usual” isn’t a term
we can accurately use anymore when talking about these two giants of
the Pacific. The partisanship may continue, as well as the political
hearsay, but the facts remain the same. A lot rides on the coming talks,
and the impact they will have on the global economy is unpredictable.

I guess you could say: “it’s complicated.”

The opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints expressed by the authors are theirs alone and don’t reflect the official position of Geopoliticalmonitor.com or any other institution.

Eurasia Review

Counterintelligence from Michael_Novakhov (50 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Palestinians’ Suffering Empowering Iran’s Extremist Regime – OpEd

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The failure to push Israel’s government to accept a just peace and end its occupation of Palestine and oppression of Palestinian rights has empowered extremist regimes, including and especially Iran. Tehran thrives on the fact that Palestinians suffer and uses every aspect of that suffering to strengthen its network of extremist allies.

By scorning peace with the Palestinians, Israel is steadily fueling the Islamic Republic’s growing strength. Although both Israel and America have vowed to wage conflict with Iran, history shows us that both nations have limited their military responses to Iran to air strikes, bombings and embargoes designed to punish Iran’s government and people.

On the other hand, the use of brutality and military strikes has done nothing to force Hamas to its knees in Gaza and only acted to give the group greater strength there.

If the Arab world would stand up to Israel’s war crimes, apartheid policies and extremist notions of Zionist superiority, it would not only be bringing about an end to the Palestine-Israel conflict, but it would also be weakening Iran, which feeds on the continuation of Palestinian suffering.

The near total lack of initiative by the Arab world has allowed the Israeli government to dismiss all efforts to achieve a genuine peace, meaning the region is at risk of being plunged into worsening conflict, while the Iranian regime is empowered by the extremist movements.

It takes true vision to see the unfolding catastrophe facing the Arab world in the wake of the dormant peace process and near total Arab acquiescence to Israel’s guileful policies.

Making peace with Israel without achieving a genuine resolution to the Palestine conflict will only empower extremists to unite around one radical agenda. And that empowers Iran to escalate its influence beyond its own borders.

Iran’s standing is empowered by the differing challenges facing the various Arab nations, such as the turmoil in Syria, Iraq and Yemen. Iran continues to strengthen its influence in Lebanon through Syria and the radical Hezbollah militia.

In the absence of a Palestinian state that offers true hope to the Palestinians and fuel for the movement for social justice throughout the Middle East, Iran continues to grow in strength.

Now is the time for the Arab world to unite and turn the tables on Iran, not by trumpeting Israel’s violent aggression and threats against Iran but by demanding that America acts.

The US is the lynchpin in this equation. It sustains Israel through billions of dollars in funding and military support and the backing of its biased mainstream news media. American support has allowed Israel to be impervious to the concepts of justice and the rule of law.

The Arab world can’t keep Israel in check because Israel’s politics is too cunning and deceitful. But it can put pressure on America.

Despite Trump’s rhetoric and actions in support of Israel, he is walking a thin line that could easily provoke Tel Aviv into cleverly undermining his political will before shifting its support to someone else. It’s not like Trump or his wobbly Republican base is any different to his Democratic foes when it comes to supporting Israel. Israel’s government can stand with Trump for as long as he benefits them and showers them with gifts, or it can flip like a light switch and turn off support for Trump, instead embracing nearly any of the Democratic leadership.

It is Israel and, to some extent, America that have refused to embrace the laudable 2002 Arab League peace initiative originated by Saudi Arabia. That initiative still stands and has not been abandoned.

Pending peace in Palestine, extremism continues to maintain the threatening upper hand.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Palestinians’ Suffering Empowering Iran’s Extremist Regime – OpEd

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The failure to push Israel’s government to accept a just peace and end its occupation of Palestine and oppression of Palestinian rights has empowered extremist regimes, including and especially Iran. Tehran thrives on the fact that Palestinians suffer and uses every aspect of that suffering to strengthen its network of extremist allies.

By scorning peace with the Palestinians, Israel is steadily fueling the Islamic Republic’s growing strength. Although both Israel and America have vowed to wage conflict with Iran, history shows us that both nations have limited their military responses to Iran to air strikes, bombings and embargoes designed to punish Iran’s government and people.

On the other hand, the use of brutality and military strikes has done nothing to force Hamas to its knees in Gaza and only acted to give the group greater strength there.

If the Arab world would stand up to Israel’s war crimes, apartheid policies and extremist notions of Zionist superiority, it would not only be bringing about an end to the Palestine-Israel conflict, but it would also be weakening Iran, which feeds on the continuation of Palestinian suffering.

The near total lack of initiative by the Arab world has allowed the Israeli government to dismiss all efforts to achieve a genuine peace, meaning the region is at risk of being plunged into worsening conflict, while the Iranian regime is empowered by the extremist movements.

It takes true vision to see the unfolding catastrophe facing the Arab world in the wake of the dormant peace process and near total Arab acquiescence to Israel’s guileful policies.

Making peace with Israel without achieving a genuine resolution to the Palestine conflict will only empower extremists to unite around one radical agenda. And that empowers Iran to escalate its influence beyond its own borders.

Iran’s standing is empowered by the differing challenges facing the various Arab nations, such as the turmoil in Syria, Iraq and Yemen. Iran continues to strengthen its influence in Lebanon through Syria and the radical Hezbollah militia.

In the absence of a Palestinian state that offers true hope to the Palestinians and fuel for the movement for social justice throughout the Middle East, Iran continues to grow in strength.

Now is the time for the Arab world to unite and turn the tables on Iran, not by trumpeting Israel’s violent aggression and threats against Iran but by demanding that America acts.

The US is the lynchpin in this equation. It sustains Israel through billions of dollars in funding and military support and the backing of its biased mainstream news media. American support has allowed Israel to be impervious to the concepts of justice and the rule of law.

The Arab world can’t keep Israel in check because Israel’s politics is too cunning and deceitful. But it can put pressure on America.

Despite Trump’s rhetoric and actions in support of Israel, he is walking a thin line that could easily provoke Tel Aviv into cleverly undermining his political will before shifting its support to someone else. It’s not like Trump or his wobbly Republican base is any different to his Democratic foes when it comes to supporting Israel. Israel’s government can stand with Trump for as long as he benefits them and showers them with gifts, or it can flip like a light switch and turn off support for Trump, instead embracing nearly any of the Democratic leadership.

It is Israel and, to some extent, America that have refused to embrace the laudable 2002 Arab League peace initiative originated by Saudi Arabia. That initiative still stands and has not been abandoned.

Pending peace in Palestine, extremism continues to maintain the threatening upper hand.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites): The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Palestinians’ Suffering Empowering Iran’s Extremist Regime – OpEd

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The failure to push Israel’s government to accept a just peace and end its occupation of Palestine and oppression of Palestinian rights has empowered extremist regimes, including and especially Iran. Tehran thrives on the fact that Palestinians suffer and uses every aspect of that suffering to strengthen its network of extremist allies.

By scorning peace with the Palestinians, Israel is steadily fueling the Islamic Republic’s growing strength. Although both Israel and America have vowed to wage conflict with Iran, history shows us that both nations have limited their military responses to Iran to air strikes, bombings and embargoes designed to punish Iran’s government and people.

On the other hand, the use of brutality and military strikes has done nothing to force Hamas to its knees in Gaza and only acted to give the group greater strength there.

If the Arab world would stand up to Israel’s war crimes, apartheid policies and extremist notions of Zionist superiority, it would not only be bringing about an end to the Palestine-Israel conflict, but it would also be weakening Iran, which feeds on the continuation of Palestinian suffering.

The near total lack of initiative by the Arab world has allowed the Israeli government to dismiss all efforts to achieve a genuine peace, meaning the region is at risk of being plunged into worsening conflict, while the Iranian regime is empowered by the extremist movements.

It takes true vision to see the unfolding catastrophe facing the Arab world in the wake of the dormant peace process and near total Arab acquiescence to Israel’s guileful policies.

Making peace with Israel without achieving a genuine resolution to the Palestine conflict will only empower extremists to unite around one radical agenda. And that empowers Iran to escalate its influence beyond its own borders.

Iran’s standing is empowered by the differing challenges facing the various Arab nations, such as the turmoil in Syria, Iraq and Yemen. Iran continues to strengthen its influence in Lebanon through Syria and the radical Hezbollah militia.

In the absence of a Palestinian state that offers true hope to the Palestinians and fuel for the movement for social justice throughout the Middle East, Iran continues to grow in strength.

Now is the time for the Arab world to unite and turn the tables on Iran, not by trumpeting Israel’s violent aggression and threats against Iran but by demanding that America acts.

The US is the lynchpin in this equation. It sustains Israel through billions of dollars in funding and military support and the backing of its biased mainstream news media. American support has allowed Israel to be impervious to the concepts of justice and the rule of law.

The Arab world can’t keep Israel in check because Israel’s politics is too cunning and deceitful. But it can put pressure on America.

Despite Trump’s rhetoric and actions in support of Israel, he is walking a thin line that could easily provoke Tel Aviv into cleverly undermining his political will before shifting its support to someone else. It’s not like Trump or his wobbly Republican base is any different to his Democratic foes when it comes to supporting Israel. Israel’s government can stand with Trump for as long as he benefits them and showers them with gifts, or it can flip like a light switch and turn off support for Trump, instead embracing nearly any of the Democratic leadership.

It is Israel and, to some extent, America that have refused to embrace the laudable 2002 Arab League peace initiative originated by Saudi Arabia. That initiative still stands and has not been abandoned.

Pending peace in Palestine, extremism continues to maintain the threatening upper hand.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News

Global Security News from Michael_Novakhov (27 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Eurasia Review: Palestinians’ Suffering Empowering Iran’s Extremist Regime – OpEd

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The failure to push Israel’s government to accept a just peace and end its occupation of Palestine and oppression of Palestinian rights has empowered extremist regimes, including and especially Iran. Tehran thrives on the fact that Palestinians suffer and uses every aspect of that suffering to strengthen its network of extremist allies.

By scorning peace with the Palestinians, Israel is steadily fueling the Islamic Republic’s growing strength. Although both Israel and America have vowed to wage conflict with Iran, history shows us that both nations have limited their military responses to Iran to air strikes, bombings and embargoes designed to punish Iran’s government and people.

On the other hand, the use of brutality and military strikes has done nothing to force Hamas to its knees in Gaza and only acted to give the group greater strength there.

If the Arab world would stand up to Israel’s war crimes, apartheid policies and extremist notions of Zionist superiority, it would not only be bringing about an end to the Palestine-Israel conflict, but it would also be weakening Iran, which feeds on the continuation of Palestinian suffering.

The near total lack of initiative by the Arab world has allowed the Israeli government to dismiss all efforts to achieve a genuine peace, meaning the region is at risk of being plunged into worsening conflict, while the Iranian regime is empowered by the extremist movements.

It takes true vision to see the unfolding catastrophe facing the Arab world in the wake of the dormant peace process and near total Arab acquiescence to Israel’s guileful policies.

Making peace with Israel without achieving a genuine resolution to the Palestine conflict will only empower extremists to unite around one radical agenda. And that empowers Iran to escalate its influence beyond its own borders.

Iran’s standing is empowered by the differing challenges facing the various Arab nations, such as the turmoil in Syria, Iraq and Yemen. Iran continues to strengthen its influence in Lebanon through Syria and the radical Hezbollah militia.

In the absence of a Palestinian state that offers true hope to the Palestinians and fuel for the movement for social justice throughout the Middle East, Iran continues to grow in strength.

Now is the time for the Arab world to unite and turn the tables on Iran, not by trumpeting Israel’s violent aggression and threats against Iran but by demanding that America acts.

The US is the lynchpin in this equation. It sustains Israel through billions of dollars in funding and military support and the backing of its biased mainstream news media. American support has allowed Israel to be impervious to the concepts of justice and the rule of law.

The Arab world can’t keep Israel in check because Israel’s politics is too cunning and deceitful. But it can put pressure on America.

Despite Trump’s rhetoric and actions in support of Israel, he is walking a thin line that could easily provoke Tel Aviv into cleverly undermining his political will before shifting its support to someone else. It’s not like Trump or his wobbly Republican base is any different to his Democratic foes when it comes to supporting Israel. Israel’s government can stand with Trump for as long as he benefits them and showers them with gifts, or it can flip like a light switch and turn off support for Trump, instead embracing nearly any of the Democratic leadership.

It is Israel and, to some extent, America that have refused to embrace the laudable 2002 Arab League peace initiative originated by Saudi Arabia. That initiative still stands and has not been abandoned.

Pending peace in Palestine, extremism continues to maintain the threatening upper hand.

Eurasia Review

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Global Security News: 1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): FOX News: Madonna seemingly responds to butt implants speculation: I’m ‘entitled to free agency over my body’

Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Madonna is speaking out following recent speculation from fans that she enhanced her backside.

FOX News

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)

The Global Security News


Spread the Knowledge
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    27
    Shares
  • 27
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •